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BlueLab | Audio Plugins update - Improvements and new features
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Software BlueLab | Audio Plugins update - Improvements and new features

BlueLab | Audio Plugins update - Improvements and new features-bluelab-update-denoiser-wav3s-bm.jpg

BlueLab | Audio Plugins update - Improvements and new features

BlueLab has updated the following plugins with improvements and new features: StereoWidth, Denoiser, Wav3s and Ghost Viewer.

More information and release notes on this page:
https://bluelab-plugs.com/updates/bl...pdate-june2020
Attached Thumbnails
BlueLab | Audio Plugins update - Improvements and new features-bluelab-update-denoiser-wav3s-bm.jpg  
Old 4 days ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Last night I was comparing a few pitch-shifters on ambient material (no transients) - pitch shifter plugins are rare, and good ones without harsh artifacts are even hard to find - and I found your pitch shifter to have the most natural sound when dropping an octave, even better than the DAWs own stretch function.

Your sub generator is also pretty cool but won't dethrone refuse Lowender for me.

Also noticed in Plugindoctor your plugins are fully 64-bit output.. nice!

And thanks for the freebies by the way - Wav3s has just a little nostalgic vibe of Unknown Pleasures
Old 4 days ago
  #3
Wow, thank you for this message Very interesting comparisons!

The PitchShift plugin uses phases changes information to handle frequencies more accurately. Because for example if we have a pure sine sound of 440Hz, and phase is changing over the time, we won't hear exactly 440Hz, but a bit lower or higher frequency. When watched with an oscilloscope, the 440Hz sine wave will "advance" or will "move back".

Interesting to see the refuse Lowender plugin! The Infra sub generator uses a totally different approach. First of all it uses FFT shenanigans

To confirm, yes, the BlueLab plugins process the sound using double floating point precision, which corresponds to 64-bit.
Old 3 days ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueLab | Audio Plugins View Post
To confirm, yes, the BlueLab plugins process the sound using double floating point precision, which corresponds to 64-bit.
Seems to be quite a bit of debate about this implementation lately. Maybe it's the next battlefield in digital processing?

Some developers have been doing double-precision floating point for a long time (Voxengo / Airwindows), others are just catching on (Fuse Audio / Tokyo Dawn)... but then many/most (Fabfilter even) are stubbornly dismissing or outright rejecting the notion that it's important / makes a difference. The general thinking is that you can't hear a difference so who cares. To me that seems rather lazy.

Is double-precision floating point difficult to implement? What advantages does it bring (filter accuracy)? Can you have double-precision internal processing but then 32-bit output (I'm thinking that's what happens a lot)? Is that then considered "truncated"? But the artifacts of that truncation are so low level it doesn't matter - or does it (accumulative)? Why have you done 64-bit output for BlueLab plugins?
Old 2 days ago
  #5
Quote:
Is double-precision floating point difficult to implement?
For a plugin made from scratch, this is exactly the same difficulty than single-precision. For an existing plugin, this can take time to port it to double-precision.

Quote:
What advantages does it bring (filter accuracy)?
I found a reliable answer in the book "Designing Sound" by Andy Farnell - p123.
It is explained that processing digital sound leads to errors and errors are accumulated. Using 64 bit makes the processing accumulate less errors.

For example in the different steps of processing inside a given plugin. Or in the different process phases of a plugin chain + DAW.

In the same book (p121), it is also explained that with 32 bit, we have a dynamic range of 192dB, and with 64 bit we have a dynamic range of 385dB which is far more than the dynamic range of the natural sounds.

So, not sure there is a unique answer to the question "does it give a better quality or is it useless?"

Quote:
Can you have double-precision internal processing but then 32-bit output
Yes, this is totally feasible! I don't know if it is a common practice...
Using re-quantization to go from 64 bit to 32 bit output is a loss of information for sure, but not sure it can be audible. In this case, we don't have the "accumulation" phenomenon (all the processing is done in 64 bit without accumulation, then one re-quantization is done to go to 32 bit output).

Quote:
Why have you done 64-bit output for BlueLab plugins?
At the beginning, for no particular reason, it looked like it was the usual format.

An important element about using 32 bit vs 64 bit is that using 64 bit requires a bit more CPU power than when making the same processing with 32 bit.
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