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Black Rooster Audio launches the KH-COMP1
Old 3 weeks ago
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Software Black Rooster Audio launches the KH-COMP1



KH-COMP1 |Koen Heldens Signature Compressor

Koen Heldens is one expert when it comes to producing some of the best and most-streamed albums in the hip-hop genre - so when the collaboration opportunity arose, we knew that we'd create some exceptional tools together.

His go-to plug-ins needed some fine-tuning to meet his needs, so we developed a bespoke solution that is like no other compressor on the market today. Koen's ideas of process timing, channel linking and sidechain filtering have really pushed the BRA team to create this one-of-a-kind tool.

The result of countless development hours and listening sessions is this beast of a compressor, that is up to the standards of one of the greatest mixing engineers of the moment, and that includes the best levelling amplifier that Black Rooster Audio has developed to date, available as AAX/VST/AU.

Please make use of our 14-day trial and check out this incredible compression unit.

The KH-COMP1 has been launched today with an intro price of $109 instead of $139 for a limited time only!
For further info, please click here.

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FEATURES
4 DETECTOR MODES - HILBERT/PEAK/VINTAGE/RMS
The KH-COMP1 Compressor offers incredible versatility for shaping the envelope that drives this unit - for broad or precise capturing of the sidechain level. The 4 detector modes allow for the most flexibility with time parameters and precise threshold control. The Hilbert detector is a 90-degree phase shifter, that will show the signal’s exact envelope, without any distortion or overshoots. Forget about true peak, this is the real deal! In fact, it is the fastet envelope detector on the market!

INVERTIBLE SC FILTER
The sidechain signal can be trimmed perfectly using the 2-band invertible filter. Both the low and high ends can be processed according to your needs, which will allow for more control with ducking, pumping effects and de-essing. With inverting the filter, you are able to surgically cut out the mids. With the “listen” option, you can double-check your SC filter settings, before it will be handled by the envelope detector.

BLENDED STEREO-LINK
Blending dual mono to stereo is very helpful when you need detailed control over the relation between the stereo channels and their processing.

KNEE PARAMETER
The knee parameter smoothes out the compression effect beautifully, for a seamless result. If you’re aiming for a harsher effect, just let your signal brush over the hard edge.

SSE2 OPTIMIZED CODE
DSP operations are pipelined using the SSE2 instruction set. This ensures a high-performance operation despite its very complex computations.

ZERO LATENCY
The KH-COMP1 is a zero-latency compressor that does not require sample delay compensation, making it ideal for real-time monitoring or live environments.

HIGHDPI/RETINA SUPPORT
The user interfaces support high pixel density on both Windows and Mac OS systems, giving you the most enjoyable user experience on high DPI displays. Please refer to your DAW manual to learn whether it is HighDPI compatible if you're working on Windows.

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#blackroosteraudio #koenheldens #khcomp1 #stayhome #staysafe
Old 3 weeks ago
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Lesha's Avatar
Love at first sight.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #3
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It's been a while since BRA released something and what a raturn!
I'm amazed!!!

Works great on everything! Drum bass, in Peak mode so easy to bring up the room without pumping.
That Hilbert detection on the master is insane!
Bass guitar and Vintage, Peak or Hilbert modes even outs dynamics without sucking away low end!
So versatile, at first sight like another compressor, but it was before I tried it.

Oh and vocals, Just drop it on the track, switch to Peak mode and adjust Threshold, and you're there, nice compression without any artifacts.

It makes me want to remix a coule last projects I was working on.


Bravo BRA!!! Bar gainer for sure!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #4
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I like how I can get snap of 1176 without the bad compression. I'm not a fan of most itb 1176. I barely like hardware, but at least with hardware it doesn't make the transients spitty and clicky like most software. Good job with this, perfect compromise.
Old 3 weeks ago
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Awesome compressor! Thanks
Old 3 weeks ago
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Ive been looking for something new and exciting in the world of compressors. I really appreciate the "outside of the box" thinking that went into this one. The Hilbert detector is really unique and it seems there is not much this beast cannot handle. KHC can manhandle unruly signals into submission like nothing else and sound great doing it.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
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Amazing!

BRA!! Man this thing is killing it!! An amazing plugin! ???

Drums, vocals, clarinets, bongos it sounds good on everything! I love the new hilbert detection mode!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by db9d9 View Post
Ive been looking for something new and exciting in the world of compressors. I really appreciate the "outside of the box" thinking that went into this one. The Hilbert detector is really unique and it seems there is not much this beast cannot handle. KHC can manhandle unruly signals into submission like nothing else and sound great doing it.
Thank you very much!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Niclas.G View Post
BRA!! Man this thing is killing it!! An amazing plugin! ???

Drums, vocals, clarinets, bongos it sounds good on everything! I love the new hilbert detection mode!
Thank you very much!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
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This thing definitely deserves some hype. I'm quite amazed at how flexible it is.. and most importantly, it's completely unique in how it's compression action is applied, thus making it immediately valuable as yet another tool in the toolkit. I love abusing the sidechain filters, forcing this thing to pump and breathe, then using the wet/dry mix to blend it in with whatever source I want to enhance the groove of.

Love it!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmanic View Post
This thing definitely deserves some hype. I'm quite amazed at how flexible it is.. and most importantly, it's completely unique in how it's compression action is applied, thus making it immediately valuable as yet another tool in the toolkit. I love abusing the sidechain filters, forcing this thing to pump and breathe, then using the wet/dry mix to blend it in with whatever source I want to enhance the groove of.

Love it!
I agree, it deserves much more attention. I love both the Hilbert and Vintage detection modes. It's as almost as someone listened to my idea of a perfect compressor and then added some more
Old 2 weeks ago
  #12
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Hi guys. Can you post your experience of how you use it on what material and where you gotten the best results or if it? Would be great.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nichttuntun View Post
Hi guys. Can you post your experience of how you use it on what material and where you gotten the best results or if it? Would be great.
I have used Hilbert detection in my audiobook editing chain, although not more than 3 dB compression, sounded very natural and transparent. Also tried Hilbert on bass and drums and it worked great, Vintage detection also great on drums.

I am interested in other people's opinions, because this is such a versatile compressor it is suited for all sorts of use cases!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #14
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Thank you. I still struggle sometimes finding a good compressor technique for acustic basses. And I still didn't quite understand what the *env* function does exactly in conjunction with the Q for low and high. It seems to be quite powerful nevertheless.
Old 2 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nichttuntun View Post
Thank you. I still struggle sometimes finding a good compressor technique for acustic basses. And I still didn't quite understand what the *env* function does exactly in conjunction with the Q for low and high. It seems to be quite powerful nevertheless.
I presume you did not demo it yet, it's not "env" but "F.INV", which allows you to "invert" the sidechain filter, a very powerful option which you can use to pinpoint the frequency you want to compress. Use the "listen" button to be able to hear what it is doing.
Old 2 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lesha View Post
I presume you did not demo it yet, it's not "env" but "F.INV", which allows you to "invert" the sidechain filter, a very powerful option which you can use to pinpoint the frequency you want to compress. Use the "listen" button to be able to hear what it is doing.
Cool. Thanks. I bought and already used it but the text was so small I read it as "env"
I guess I should lay definitely read the manual.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nichttuntun View Post
Cool. Thanks. I bought and already used it but the text was so small I read it as "env"
I guess I should lay definitely read the manual.
I agree it looks like ENV at 100% GUI size, I use 110% so it was more apparent.
Old 2 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nichttuntun View Post
Thank you. I still struggle sometimes finding a good compressor technique for acustic basses. And I still didn't quite understand what the *env* function does exactly in conjunction with the Q for low and high. It seems to be quite powerful nevertheless.
I like the Hilbert detector a lot for exactly this, acoustic bass. Also great on vocals.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by db9d9 View Post
I like the Hilbert detector a lot for exactly this, acoustic bass. Also great on vocals.
Thank you. I already tried that and it remained a natural sound, I liked it a lot for such sources. My main struggle refers to hard to tame basses with long tails where the harmonics resonate very loud and partially get louder when the tail rings out...very annoying.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #20
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Does anybody have any techy info about the Hilbert mode? Like to think I know my onions pretty well, but I admit it's a new term to my ears. Phase shift = cool, but in what way does that affect the envelope detector compared to, say, a stock DAW compressor's detector? It's a rectifier combined with an Allpass? Not so clear and keen to learn.

Especially keen since that mode sounds pretty unique in the first few quick tests (DI bass, drum machine, male vox)

Great to see new chapters afoot at BRA. Thanks Andre! Will most likely pick this up and use it a LOT.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneyBCN View Post
Does anybody have any techy info about the Hilbert mode? Like to think I know my onions pretty well, but I admit it's a new term to my ears. Phase shift = cool, but in what way does that affect the envelope detector compared to, say, a stock DAW compressor's detector? It's a rectifier combined with an Allpass? Not so clear and keen to learn.

Especially keen since that mode sounds pretty unique in the first few quick tests (DI bass, drum machine, male vox)

Great to see new chapters afoot at BRA. Thanks Andre! Will most likely pick this up and use it a LOT.
Maybe this could help: https://dsp.stackexchange.com/questi...bert-transform

If I understood correctly, it uses an envelope for signal detection instead of peak or RMS.

Old 2 weeks ago
  #22
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Well, AFAIK all signal detectors in a compressor sidechain generate an envelope. And “Hilbert” is part of the sidechain envelope creation, so the posts talking about allpass filters on the signal itself are off in the weeds.

I’m fairly math challenged, so I won’t go far with this, but the Hilbert Transform applied to a cosine wave creates a 90 degree phase shift forwards and backwards respectively to the positive and negative components of a signal. The upshot is that the magnitude components become symmetrical and are real numbers: no imaginary parts in your calculations. Applying the Hilbert Transform to a sine wave doesn’t create symetric components, but four applications of the transform will net the same result as that applied to the cosine wave. I believe this is what is referred to as a “quadrature filter”.

So what does all this mean? I think at bottom, it’s another way of producing an envelope to control compression. There are quite a lot of aspects to creating that envelope, for example “attack”, “onset” and “transients”. Those are related, but actually quite different properties of a musical signal. Some signal detectors do better on one or more of these aspects than others, but I have no idea what advantages a Hilbert-based detector gives to compression. Based on the “fast” adjective used in KH COMP-1’s promotion, I would assume accuracy is one goal, but whether that relates to low frequency (ie “sine-like”) or wide band (ie noise or square wave) signals, I don’t know.

HTH
Old 2 weeks ago
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lesha View Post
Maybe this could help:
Quote:
Originally Posted by vze26m98 View Post
Well, AFAIK all signal detectors in a compressor sidechain generate an envelope.
Thanks both! Yeah, reading between the lines as I was, I raised the question as I could only interpret some phase manipulation and not much else, and failed to see how something as simple as an Allpass (assuming only Phase is modified) would make such huge difference to the detector behaviour. I had questions..! Heh.

My general understanding is that all/most comp detectors take the absolute value (full wave rectified), and may apply a bias current, an LPF in relation to time constants, and other filtering and shaping accordingly, which then feeds the gain reduction circuit. Cool. My math is pretty weak (musician - lol) but I have come across the Hilbert transform in my DSP adventures. I certainly don't have the hottest understanding of it, nor it's application in this comp. Appears to be a linear operation FWICT; "The Hilbert transform has a particularly simple representation in the frequency domain: it imparts a phase shift of -90° to every Fourier component of a function." - Wikipedia

Seems pretty interesting and unique-sounding, so it would be really cool to get a good understanding of this application IMO.

I can usually keep up with the DSP chat to a point, then it's good to listen and learn. So talk away guys, anybody with an idea on this, always happy to learn here
Old 2 weeks ago
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Curious to know, was this developed with Reimund Dratwa? Is he still working with the company?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneyBCN View Post
Seems pretty interesting and unique-sounding, so it would be really cool to get a good understanding of this application IMO.
I believe Vadim Zavalishin’s “Art of VA Filter Design” has some discussion of the Hilbert Yransform WRT filtration, which ultimately is the subject here.

There’s certainly enough processing power in a modern CPU to “follow” a stream of digital data at very high speed, but the crude result would be acoustically awful. (eg BC Dynamics at fastest AR goes to the edge of musicality IIRC.) So the issue is smoothing the digital data stream to achieve the most accurate representation of the signal envelope. (Another strategy would be to imitate analog electronic techniques to achieve an emulation of detectors in vintage audio equipment.)

I think instead of getting hung up in the math, Googling for recent papers on envelope creation for audio signals is a more fruitful place to study. There’s a great deal of discussion about what makes an accurate detector envelope and generally what kinds of algorithms are being used to develop such things.

HTH
Old 2 weeks ago
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vze26m98 View Post
I believe Vadim Zavalishin’s “Art of VA Filter Design” has some discussion of the Hilbert Yransform WRT filtration, which ultimately is the subject here.
Thanks! I actually read Vadim's book quite often, in certain parts, seeing that I spend most of my free time building in Core the block diagrams and abstract discussion is good for me, but I have to stop at the "state-space form" chapter, it's far beyond my reach from that point on.

I recently built a few simple limiters and levellers which do their job ok - I guess this is why I'm so curious about what BRA have implemented; I'm reading about this stuff quite a bit at the mo.

Swinging back to the topic - Would be cool to get some kind of layman terms of this mode, possibly from the dev if nobody else is too sure what this feature is?

In either case it's a marvellous compressor, fantastic dev (with or without Rei, I'm sure) and it's getting some dolla from me for sure.

Old 2 weeks ago
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lesha View Post
Cheers, some interesting stuff in here. I'm wondering if it's kinda tracking the voltage swing in radians, some kind of frequency-awareness... Again I'm probably a mile off, but thanks for the materials! Y'all can have the thread back now, lol sorry

3 more planned in this series. I'm staying tuned.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bqstudio View Post
Curious to know, was this developed with Reimund Dratwa? Is he still working with the company?
Hi, yes, of course. Reimund Dratwa still is a crucial part to the team and he has been the driving force behind the filter design and implementation of the KH-COMP1, while the initial idea of utilizing the Hilbert Transformation is based on my thesis on a "Hilbert Transform Multi-Band Expander".
Old 2 weeks ago
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vze26m98 View Post
Well, AFAIK all signal detectors in a compressor sidechain generate an envelope. And “Hilbert” is part of the sidechain envelope creation, so the posts talking about allpass filters on the signal itself are off in the weeds.

I’m fairly math challenged, so I won’t go far with this, but the Hilbert Transform applied to a cosine wave creates a 90 degree phase shift forwards and backwards respectively to the positive and negative components of a signal. The upshot is that the magnitude components become symmetrical and are real numbers: no imaginary parts in your calculations. Applying the Hilbert Transform to a sine wave doesn’t create symetric components, but four applications of the transform will net the same result as that applied to the cosine wave. I believe this is what is referred to as a “quadrature filter”.

So what does all this mean? I think at bottom, it’s another way of producing an envelope to control compression. There are quite a lot of aspects to creating that envelope, for example “attack”, “onset” and “transients”. Those are related, but actually quite different properties of a musical signal. Some signal detectors do better on one or more of these aspects than others, but I have no idea what advantages a Hilbert-based detector gives to compression. Based on the “fast” adjective used in KH COMP-1’s promotion, I would assume accuracy is one goal, but whether that relates to low frequency (ie “sine-like”) or wide band (ie noise or square wave) signals, I don’t know.

HTH
Hi, let me take it from there and explain it a little easier:

A 90 degree phase shift on a sinus would be the cosinus. A Hilbert Transformer is generating just that over the whole spectrum, including noise and square-like signals, as those can be described as "infinite overlay of sinuses".

So with the sinus and cosinus available for every frequency, we can do the following:
sin²x + cos²x = 1

So the "power" aka the squared sin/cos-signals combined equals 1 for every point x (time), which would mean, we would have the ideal representation of the sinus's level at any point in time --> this is the ideal envelope.
Old 2 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackRooster View Post
Hi, let me take it from there and explain it a little easier:

A 90 degree phase shift on a sinus would be the cosinus. A Hilbert Transformer is generating just that over the whole spectrum, including noise and square, as those can be described as "infinite overlay of sinuses".

So with the sinus and cosinus available for every frequency, we can do the following:
sin²x + cos²x = 1

So the "power" aka the squared sin/cis-signals combined equals 1 for every point x (time), which would mean, we would have the ideal representation of the sinus's level at any point in time --> this is the ideal envelope.
Thanks, love it when developers go deep on discussing their algorithms!
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