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RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020
Old 17th January 2020
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RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020

RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020

The new 12Mic, AVB Tool and M-1610 Pro offer flexible, reliable solutions for AVB conversion and recording

Anaheim, CA – January 16, 2020 — RME, [Booth 14702, ACC North Hall], German manufacturer of premium digital audio solutions, will launch the new 12Mic, AVB Tool and M-1610 Pro at the 2020 NAMM Show from January 16–19. The three new audio networking products provide professionals with state-of-the-art mic preamps, flexible conversion and recording solutions for AVB and MADI applications that ensure pristine audio.

RME’s first microphone preamplifier designed for audio networks, the 12Mic 12-channel digitally controlled mic pre features integrated MADI and AVB connectivity along with RME’s highest-quality converters for professional recording situations.

The new AVB Tool features four state-of-the-art microphone preamps, 64 channels of AVB, up to 128 channels of MADI and four analog channels for pristine audio applications — making it a valuable tool in various recording applications, speaker calibration using SMAART, as well as live or broadcast applications.

The M-1610 Pro combines AD/DA conversion with redundant AVB and up to two independent MADI ports to deliver M-32 Pro-quality performance at an attractive price. Audio professionals in live recording situations will love the flexibility and reliability of this unit which features a unique notification system that provides rapid feedback on the device’s current state.

“With AVB being the future of audio transmission, we’re very excited introduce these three new AVB solutions,” said Derek Badala, Director of Sales at Synthax, RME’s distributor. “RME continues to lead the way in audio networking by connecting audio engineers to the next generation of audio distribution standards, and the 12Mic, AVB Tool and M-1610 Pro are three solutions that professionals can turn to for flexibility, reliability and pristine audio quality.”
RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020-rme1.jpg

12Mic
The new 12Mic features 12 channel microphone and line level inputs with digital studio quality converters, remote controllable gain, integrated MADI and AVB connectivity, and a multitude of features designed for any professional recording scenarios. While all 12 front-facing XLR connectors accept microphone and line level signals, the first four connectors also accept TRS connectors with switchable high impedance (Hi-Z) for instruments. Both the input circuit design and digital converters are based on the RME Fireface UFX+/UFX II, allowing same-quality extensions for existing Fireface users via ADAT and MADI.

The PAD-free microphone input stages have a 75 dB gain range and accept signals of up to +18 dBu. Integrating new AKM converters, the extraordinary SNR values of the UFX+ have been improved by 3 dB to an astonishing 121.2 dB(A) on all channels. All device states and controls can be operated directly on the front panel with an encoder and four buttons that change their function depending on selected feature, letting the user rapidly create gain groups, switch phantom power and route signals to the headphone.

On the digital side, the 12Mic extends RME’s lineup of AVB devices, all of which meticulously implement the IEEE standards for audio streaming, discovery and control, allowing the devices to be discovered and fully controlled by any AVB controller, making vendor-specific control protocols obsolete. Any signal reaching the 12Mic can be routed and streamed over deterministic networks with fixed latency and guaranteed bandwidth, with no switch configuration required. The 12Mic also boasts two fully redundant network ports based on the recommendations of MILAN, featuring MADI ports that support RME’s MADI redundancy implementation, giving the 12Mic multiple layers of redundancy suitable for live sound applications.

A web frontend offers convenient access to the device controls and its integrated 268x282 channel routing matrix. The matrix allows free routing between analog inputs and headphone outputs, as well as all channels of both MADI ports, the AVB streams, and three ADAT outputs. The device has no fan and therefore remains silent in all situations.

RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020-rme-2.jpg

AVB Tool
The AVB Tool combines four microphone, instrument and line level inputs, headphone and separate line level outputs, 128 channel AVB deterministic network audio and up to 128 channels of MADI I/O, side by side in a half rack 19-inch device. An internal 260x260 channel router can connect individual analog, MADI and AVB channels, providing an easy integration of both MADI and AVB devices. At the same time, its pristine analog converters interface with the most common analog signals in a control room, a studio or on stage: four XLR-TRS combo inputs with remote controllable 75 dB gain in 1 dB steps, an input line level sensitivity of +18 dBu and switchable high impedance on each channel; a stereo headphone output, and two analog line level outputs with switchable +4/+19 dBu reference level. The AVB Tool features a TFT display with an encoder and four buttons for convenient direct access to all features. It can also be fully remote controlled with a web-interface on any network link (also via Wi-Fi). The device is powered with an external power supply. Seamless redundancy is available for MADI signals when the secondary MADI port receives the same signal as the coaxial MADI input. If redundancy is not required, the optional optical single- or multimode MADI module is treated as an individual MADI I/O with full bandwidth.

Boasting eight AVB streams in AM824 (legacy AVB) or high-performance AAF (MILAN compatible) format, the AVB Tool features double the number of typical streams available in RME AVB core, with configurable size and format per stream. Up to 128 audio channels can be sent and received over AVB in total across all streams. In comparison to the 12Mic, the AVB Tool has the same input stages as the first four channels of the 12Mic — the successful combination of components found in the UFX 2 and UFX+ with a new AD converter, extended with switchable High Impedance and balanced line level on the TRS. Instead of ADAT output, it provides two balanced line level outputs at the rear, for monitoring.

RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020-rme-3.jpg

M-1610 Pro
Integrating 16 analog inputs with switchable sensitivity per channel of up to +24 dBu, eight corresponding analog outputs, and an additional headphone output, the brand new M-1610 Pro brings plenty of analog I/O to any studio setup. With its coaxial and (optional) optical MADI, redundant AVB, and four ADAT optical outputs, the device represents one of the most versatile and best performing converters on the market. Recording engineers using various analog effects and instruments in their sessions have requested a single device that combines a selection of the outstanding M-32 Pro analog inputs and outputs. The M-1610 Pro delivers even more than that at an unbeatable price point.

Compared to the M-32 Pro series, which were designed primarily for fixed installations, the M-1610 Pro adds TRS jacks that can be used instead of the D-Sub connectors on input 11-16, and TRS jacks that can be used in parallel to D-Sub output 1-2, as well as redundant network ports and a headphone output with quick access button for source selection and volume. All device features are configurable on the large TFT display with encoder, via network using a browser-based web interface, and also via AVDECC — allowing other AVB devices to control the M-1610 Pro without using anything but the AVB standard itself.

The internal routing matrix brings up to eight AVB streams with a total of 64 channels, the coaxial and optional SFP optical MADI port with each up to 64 channels, all analog I/O and the ADAT outputs side by side for flexible routing between the 208 inputs and 234 outputs. Lowest converter latencies and deterministic AVB networking with configurable network delay down to 0.3 ms allow the M-1610 Pro to deliver samples, even from multiple devices, at incredible speeds — time-aligned with nanosecond accuracy across an entire network. The AD and DA filters have been carefully optimized for different sampling rates, with a focus on accuracy and RME’s signature ‘transparency’ (nothing added, nothing taken). Together with SteadyClock FS — the current revision of RME’s ultra-low jitter digital clock technology — the conversion to and from analog is state of the art, at any level and digital format. As a notable difference to similar devices, the three analog line levels per channel each offer the full dynamic range of the converters. The outputs are DC coupled.

Check out the new 12Mic, AVB Tool and M-1610 Pro and all of RME’s latest products, visit Synthax’s 2020 NAMM Show booth 14702 in the ACC North Hall, or visit rme-usa.com.

About Synthax, Incorporated
Synthax Inc. is the exclusive USA distributor for RME digital audio solutions, Ferrofish advanced audio applications, myMix audio products, and ALVA cableware. We supply a nationwide network of dealers with these products for professional audio, broadcast, music industry, commercial audio, theater, military and government applications. For additional information, visit the company online at http://www.synthax.com.
rme 12mic product page: https://www.rme-audio.de/id-12mic.html
rme AVB Tool product page: https://www.rme-audio.de/avb-tool.html
rme M-1610 product page: https://www.rme-audio.de/m-1610-pro.html
Attached Thumbnails
RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020-rme-3.jpg   RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020-rme-2.jpg   RME Debuts Three New Audio Networking Products at NAMM 2020-rme1.jpg  
Old 17th January 2020
  #2
Lives for gear
Interesting. This autumn RME relased some cool products with the femtosecond "FS" technology solving problem with clocks over MADI.
Now they relases more products with MADI but without the technology, and they have still not produced a single product with MADI and FS.
The AVB tool had been a buy with FS, now it's a no thanks to old stuff.
Old 17th January 2020
  #3
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AVB only? No Dante?
Old 17th January 2020
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bace View Post
Interesting. This autumn RME relased some cool products with the femtosecond "FS" technology solving problem with clocks over MADI.
Now they relases more products with MADI but without the technology, and they have still not produced a single product with MADI and FS.
The AVB tool had been a buy with FS, now it's a no thanks to old stuff.
Did you read the text about M-1610 Pro?
Old 18th January 2020
  #5
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulrich View Post
Did you read the text about M-1610 Pro?
According to RME spec's they ALL have FS, so they do not use the same converter as UFXII/+. Analog spec is "Comming soon".
Old 18th January 2020
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by technomind View Post
AVB only? No Dante?
They go the AVB route, that‘s what i was told at the Tonmeistertagung 2018
Old 4 weeks ago
  #7
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That´s a shame, as I really loved RME since the hammerfall days: Had two of those in the studio and run babyfaces with the two DJ laptops. They´re simply top notch regarding stability and latency.

Unfortunately (well, sort of), I decided to go Dante in the studio and redesigned everything last year around a mixed Dante/MADI concept.... so I had my hopes up when they released the Digiface Dante. Thought there would be more options including RME in the future. But I understand there are certain aspects that make AVB attractive and Dante´s licensing fees (for manufacturers) are obviously another thing to consider. So for me it´s either focusrite/apogee/ferrofish or adding a third protocol when it´s time to expand.

Anyway, if I would trust one company to build a great Dante-AVB-MADI bridge, it´s them. I´ll keep lurking.
Old 4 weeks ago
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If needed you can use a Digiface Dante with these units and also to interface with a computer
if I was to use or take a chance on a PCIe Dante card Offered by Focusrite or Yamaha, but I
would probably use an HDSPe MADI, or an HDSPe MADI fx PCIe card. I don't know why no one
has combined AVB With Dante either through one or two different ports but I suspect Audinates proprietary patent control BS has a lot to do with it as they seem to perpetuate through out all devises offered by others in a way that disables innovation and common sense.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #9
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MIKEHARRIS's Avatar
What does RME know we don’t ?
AVB has been most visibly been employed by AVID in the hideous S3L.i realize Dante means $ to Audinate but.....?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #10
cbm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS View Post
What does RME know we don’t ?
AVB has been most visibly been employed by AVID in the hideous S3L.i realize Dante means $ to Audinate but.....?
MOTU and PreSonus are heavily into AVB.
AVB is an open standard, which helped me fall into the MOTU camp.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS View Post
What does RME know we don’t ?
AVB has been most visibly been employed by AVID in the hideous S3L.i realize Dante means $ to Audinate but.....?
When I made my decision roughly 1-2 years ago, AVB gear wasn´t that available, but this has changed a bit. Dante has a bit more of a track record, but AVB is also proven in my book. It´s still two camps, with Dante being pretty widespread in the live scene. My use in the studio (let´s say mid-size project studio) is absolutely possible and I would probably choose Dante again, but now the gap is a lot smaller and there are more choices on the AVB side of things. not more than Dante, more than 2 years ago. Some people may decide by preferred manufacturer.

AVB is also used in automotive, as it offers even better latency values (TSN, time sensitive networking). So for timing demands beyond our audio stuff (like cameras feeding images to AI driving), that can be important. This comes at a cost though, as your network needs to be ready to support features that are needed for that kind of performance. I wouldn´t think about AVB if my network didn´t sport a bunch of mid-range Cisco switches (cat3k) or something in that league. AFAIK AVB minimum latency is 0.25ms compared to 1ms in Dante. If your application sees A LOT of back and forth traffic, latency can add up, but in my situation I rarely see audio traversing the network more than 2 or 3 times. Given the latencies we see from average USB interfaces, Dante is fast enough for me. Probably someone who has worked with AVB can share a bit of experience regarding real-life latencies. I run my environment on 1ms using the focusrite PCIeR card and a few ferrofish converters. Since they offer MADI and ADAT as well, that´s where the babyfaces connect if needed.

One of my customers on the other hand, a large nationwide broadcaster, has a really huge and complex AV-network, so they picked AVB over Dante for the same reason (probably not the only reason).

You make also like this thread: Dante to AVB bridge

Back to RME: I hope they support both worlds in the future, like having digiface in different flavors. However, their latest release is not for me, unfortunately. It´s a bit of the opposite version of what AVB people feel when looking at the latest 64ch monster from antelope. We as end users would benefit much from not being put in an either-or situation, so smart vendors will give us options.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
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throbert's Avatar
 

I've found that about all Dante devices seem to have a stupidity in common
with each other. It's like I always think, why the hell did they do it that way
when it could have been done way better another way and then, oh it's
Dante, but of coarse.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by throbert View Post
I've found that about all Dante devices seem to have a stupidity in common.
Stupidity is exhibited in many devices lacking power cords too
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
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