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Top Music Library/Publishing companies for 2017?
Old 1 week ago
  #91
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JJAM View Post
So, on pretty much a tangent, is it that bad for a showreel to be too eclectic? My music background goes from Irish folk/classical at the age of 8 through the gamut of pretty much everything genre wise. But I often hear that the all encompassing approach is not the way to go, despite me making some inroads re more of the decent music libraries out there...

Here's a link to it...

http://bit.ly/2mK8PSb
Hey I love that first track - so much like Chic!

I think your best bet is to lock down a style that you can really do well and basically pitch an album to potential libraries. That's what's worked for me on a couple of occasions. For example - that Chic-esque track sounds great, and it stands out among 10,000 tension cues and epic trailer wannabes, so produce half a dozen or so disco tracks (might be good to infuse an optional modern EDM edge for a bit more mass appeal), and pitch that as a potential album.

My 0.02...there are a lot of guys ITT much more established in the library music game than me, though!
Old 1 week ago
  #92
Gear Maniac
 

Thanks! Yeah, as you can hear, very much inspired by Chic. I am thinking of pitching an album in that vein, although most libraries seem to have enough of that kind of stuff - but, as you say, giving it a EDM edge could be an approach they'd go for.
Old 6 days ago
  #93
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunsetAnR View Post
I want to dump my seed into every nook & cranny imaginable. I'm the Genghis Khan of production music.
Forget the top companies then. They only work exclusively.
Old 6 days ago
  #94
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
Well I was there last year for a week... there is talk about sending me out to London again to do some more albums... this time if I go I might be there longer (maybe two or three weeks). But it's all up in the air right now.

The other thing is I don't know how useful a lot of my information really is to composers in the UK. Most of what I talk about pertains to US law and how the system works in the US. As I've been finding out over the last couple years (as I am getting more and more involved with international sub publishing), the way music libraries and music licensing works in the UK is dramatically different than here in the US.

So I don't know how useful I would really be. I also think the reason there is a lot of apathy to production music and music licensing in the UK is because of the the way it works there.

To those in the US that don't know what I'm talking about, in the UK, their PRO and their mechanical rights collection society do ALL the licensing directly. Not just the performance license but also the sync license and the mechanical license. In the UK, the PRO is PRS (equivalent to our ASCAP or BMI). Their mechanical rights society is MCPS (equivalent to our Harry Fox Agency). PRS just bought MCPS a few years ago. So now it's all under one roof.

But imagine a system where the music library didn't set the upfront sync fee rate, the PRO did. There is no negotiation. The person or business that owns and publishes the music is not involved in any way with the licensing of that music. It's ALL handled by the PRS and the rates (Sync, Performance and Mechanical) are all bundled together into ONE fee and dictated by the government, similar to how our statutory mechanical rates are set by congress here in the US.

If anyone from the UK wants to chime in please do. If I'm getting any of this wrong please let me know. As I said, i've been learning about this over the past few years... but I've been learning about it from the outside (being in the US) looking in (working with UK sub publishers).

So, in that regard, the publisher who owns and controls the music literally has no control over the music.
Hi Etch, Audio Network is not an MCPS member so negotiates their own rates which I believe are music lower. I imagine there are others that work more like a label (same as US). I'd be interested to know too!
Old 5 days ago
  #95
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunsetAnR View Post
The libraries that pay upfront.

FirstCom
Killertracks
Megatrax
Extreme
EMI
APM
BMG
5 Alarm
I don't believe any of these are currently accepting artist submissions. They are not easy libraries to get into
Old 5 days ago
  #96
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunsetAnR View Post
Yes, they are. If they're not accepting your stuff, get better and try again.
I emailed a few of them and asked and they said no without listening to my material. What do you suggest?
Old 5 days ago
  #97
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
I emailed a few of them and asked and they said no without listening to my material. What do you suggest?
Work even harder and harder to get in.

Do not settle for less. Make your music be the best of the best of the best. No compromises or excuses. This is the big leagues and you have to bring your A+++ game.

Even then, you may not be good enough. So you just have to bite the bullet and pour your mind, heart, body, and soul into this. There are no shortcuts.

Do the work!
Old 5 days ago
  #98
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
I emailed a few of them and asked and they said no without listening to my material. What do you suggest?
Call.
Old 4 days ago
  #99
Lives for gear
 
Silvertone's Avatar
I just wrote this in another thread...

Solicit the companies that provide the content. Robert Etoll Productions, Q Factory, Audiomachine, APM, Aspect Ratio, Megatrax, limits of Perception, Lionsgate, Elephant Music, etc... make contacts with the people that own the companies. Listen to their formats, write, compose and build your mixes like their format. Send them your music. Get a dialog going.

Don't be hurt by rejection. Try again and again. To most this shows you actually listened to their feedback and maybe even applied some of it.

It's well worth it to play the game by their rules... most of the music writers I know personally that work for these companies earn well above six figures a year.

I've even been trying to get into that side of the industry lately. Trouble is that they hire me to master their music, so that's what they want to keep me doing... not going to work for their competition.

Best of luck to everyone.
Old 4 days ago
  #100
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone View Post
I just wrote this in another thread...

Solicit the companies that provide the content. Robert Etoll Productions, Q Factory, Audiomachine, APM, Aspect Ratio, Megatrax, limits of Perception, Lionsgate, Elephant Music, etc... make contacts with the people that own the companies. Listen to their formats, write, compose and build your mixes like their format. Send them your music. Get a dialog going.

Don't be hurt by rejection. Try again and again. To most this shows you actually listened to their feedback and maybe even applied some of it.

It's well worth it to play the game by their rules... most of the music writers I know personally that work for these companies earn well above six figures a year.

I've even been trying to get into that side of the industry lately. Trouble is that they hire me to master their music, so that's what they want to keep me doing... not going to work for their competition.

Best of luck to everyone.
Very cool. thanks for the advice. I appreciate it very much.
Old 3 days ago
  #101
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desire Inspires View Post
Work even harder and harder to get in.

Do not settle for less. Make your music be the best of the best of the best. No compromises or excuses. This is the big leagues and you have to bring your A+++ game.

Even then, you may not be good enough. So you just have to bite the bullet and pour your mind, heart, body, and soul into this. There are no shortcuts.

Do the work!
It has nothing to with the quality of my music. I emailed them a nice introduction about my self. Included no music just my credits ect and asked them if they were accepting new music and they wrote back and said no. Am I missing something? How do you guys contact them? Are you cold calling? What about movie studios? Are you cold calling the music supervisors?
Old 3 days ago
  #102
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
It has nothing to with the quality of my music. I emailed them a nice introduction about my self. Included no music just my credits ect and asked them if they were accepting new music and they wrote back and said no. Am I missing something? How do you guys contact them? Are you cold calling? What about movie studios? Are you cold calling the music supervisors?
Cold call the music supervisors!
Old 2 days ago
  #103
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehrenebbage View Post
No.

EDIT:

Depends on who you are submitting to. If you're pitching it to sell to a library, don't register with your PRO. The library becomes the publisher and they'll administer for you.

If you're pitching directly to shows, producers, etc., then yes, register with your PRO.

EDIT again:

Just realized you asked two different questions. PRO registration and copyright are not the same thing. Did you mean to ask about both, or were you under the impression that they are the same?
Sorry but I'm looking for a look clarification here. So If I have a piece of library music that is in 5 different non exclusive libraries I do not want to register the tracks with my pro??

2.Is the library going to track my royalties and give me a cut? Do all libraries take a portion of my royalties or do some of them just take a cut of the sync fee?
Old 2 days ago
  #104
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
Sorry but I'm looking for a look clarification here. So If I have a piece of library music that is in 5 different non exclusive libraries I do not want to register the tracks with my pro??

2.Is the library going to track my royalties and give me a cut? Do all libraries take a portion of my royalties or do some of them just take a cut of the sync fee?

If you are planning to sell the music to a library, you probably don't need to register the tunes with a PRO. They generally handle the administration stuff.

If you are planning to put the music in a handful of non-exclusive libraries, you probably want to register the tunes with a PRO.

As for your second question, there are hundreds of different libraries and lots of different types of deals. Hard to give you a definitive answer. Some only take a percentage of sync. Some take all sync plus a percentage of publishing.
Old 2 days ago
  #105
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
Sorry but I'm looking for a look clarification here. So If I have a piece of library music that is in 5 different non exclusive libraries I do not want to register the tracks with my pro??

2.Is the library going to track my royalties and give me a cut? Do all libraries take a portion of my royalties or do some of them just take a cut of the sync fee?
Check the contract for each library you want to submit to. There are royalty free libraries that don't allow you to be a member of a pro if I am not mistaken. These are ones you'd probably want to give a wide berth.
Old 1 day ago
  #106
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
It has nothing to with the quality of my music. I emailed them a nice introduction about my self. Included no music just my credits ect and asked them if they were accepting new music and they wrote back and said no. Am I missing something? How do you guys contact them? Are you cold calling? What about movie studios? Are you cold calling the music supervisors?
who did you email and why didn't you include a link to some stuff you've done?

Also realize that you might sometimes be emailing the wrong person.
Old 1 day ago
  #107
oh and also realize that they might just not be looking for music right now... so try hitting them up again later.

every company has their own production cycles. Sometimes companies plan and budget their album a year in advance!!! Every company is different. The bigger companies like the PMA libraries are not just repositories for cues of different genres that the clients can then sift through...

the bigger libraries actually have marketing departments and put a very concentrated effort in pushing the music they release. they usually organize the music onto albums that can help them market it to the right people. They have marketing campaigns built around the albums. And so on...

It's not like going to pond 5 and putting up however many tracks you have in whatever styles you have and letting music consumers pick through it.

With these bigger libraries they are focusing on each part of the industry and creating albums of music that are targeted at specific types of uses. So it's not just "hey here are some rock tracks"...it's "here are Rock tracks SPECIFICALLY arranged and produced for use in Sports Promos." the album will have a name that reflects what the target market. And the marketing campaign behind the album will also reflect that... they won't be sending the Sports Promo album to reality TV editors or music sups that are working on 18th century dramas and so on...

every album that these big libraries do is super focused. From the compositions themselves, to the arrangement and instrumentation, to the mix and mastering and so on.

I use this as an example... Video Helper focuses on promos. So it's not just "rock" or "orchestral" or "jazz" it's those genres FOLLOWING this formula... Video Helper's marketing catch phrase is literally "Every track is the same. That's why we're different."



Watch the video... Here's a link if it doesn't play in the post...

https://vimeo.com/106634932

Now if you were to just send Video Helper your rock or urban or orchestral bed that is 2 minutes of the same thing repeating with maybe a B section thown in every 16 or 32 bars, and maybe it kind of builds to the end, and maybe you put a break in there once or twice... how do you think that is going to work for them and their clients after watching their video?

They have a specific formula... certain things always happen at SPECIFIC times regardless of the style of music.

Every industry is different and every company is different. There are different "formulas" for each area of the industry and within that each company kind of has their own formula for which they want the music arranged.

And when they do it, they market the heck out of it and spend lots of money advertising and pushing the music to the right people that can use it.

So when they say they aren't looking for music right now it could be because they really genuinely are not. Their production schedule is full for the next 6 months to a year... or it could be because based on your credits you do not write the kind of music that they could license (sending Video Helper a list of your film placements or reality TV placements isn't going to mean much to them since they do not focus on that market segment as much as they focus on Promos for example.... sending your promo placements credits to Immediate Music isn't going to mean that much because they don't focus on that segment of the market all that much). And so on...

all of these companies are looking for phenomenal music and for people that "get it" and are easy/quick to work with. If they have to hold your hand and flat out teach you how to do this... most likely they aren't going to and they will just tell you they are not looking for any music right now.
Old 1 day ago
  #108
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
oh and also realize that they might just not be looking for music right now... so try hitting them up again later.

every company has their own production cycles. Sometimes companies plan and budget their album a year in advance!!! Every company is different. The bigger companies like the PMA libraries are not just repositories for cues of different genres that the clients can then sift through...

the bigger libraries actually have marketing departments and put a very concentrated effort in pushing the music they release. they usually organize the music onto albums that can help them market it to the right people. They have marketing campaigns built around the albums. And so on...

It's not like going to pond 5 and putting up however many tracks you have in whatever styles you have and letting music consumers pick through it.

With these bigger libraries they are focusing on each part of the industry and creating albums of music that are targeted at specific types of uses. So it's not just "hey here are some rock tracks"...it's "here are Rock tracks SPECIFICALLY arranged and produced for use in Sports Promos." the album will have a name that reflects what the target market. And the marketing campaign behind the album will also reflect that... they won't be sending the Sports Promo album to reality TV editors or music sups that are working on 18th century dramas and so on...

every album that these big libraries do is super focused. From the compositions themselves, to the arrangement and instrumentation, to the mix and mastering and so on.

I use this as an example... Video Helper focuses on promos. So it's not just "rock" or "orchestral" or "jazz" it's those genres FOLLOWING this formula... Video Helper's marketing catch phrase is literally "Every track is the same. That's why we're different."



Watch the video... Here's a link if it doesn't play in the post...

https://vimeo.com/106634932

Now if you were to just send Video Helper your rock or urban or orchestral bed that is 2 minutes of the same thing repeating with maybe a B section thown in every 16 or 32 bars, and maybe it kind of builds to the end, and maybe you put a break in there once or twice... how do you think that is going to work for them and their clients after watching their video?

They have a specific formula... certain things always happen at SPECIFIC times regardless of the style of music.

Every industry is different and every company is different. There are different "formulas" for each area of the industry and within that each company kind of has their own formula for which they want the music arranged.

And when they do it, they market the heck out of it and spend lots of money advertising and pushing the music to the right people that can use it.

So when they say they aren't looking for music right now it could be because they really genuinely are not. Their production schedule is full for the next 6 months to a year... or it could be because based on your credits you do not write the kind of music that they could license (sending Video Helper a list of your film placements or reality TV placements isn't going to mean much to them since they do not focus on that market segment as much as they focus on Promos for example.... sending your promo placements credits to Immediate Music isn't going to mean that much because they don't focus on that segment of the market all that much). And so on...

all of these companies are looking for phenomenal music and for people that "get it" and are easy/quick to work with. If they have to hold your hand and flat out teach you how to do this... most likely they aren't going to and they will just tell you they are not looking for any music right now.

Thanks so much for taking the time out! I really appreciate that! I do notice that most of the bigger libraries use the album format. So if you were me. You have a large catalog of a lot of different types of music how would you pitch towards different libraries assuming they all are looking for different things and different formats? Obviously I wouldn't send a library that specializes in indie rock a edm album but for a label that doesn't specialize in one type of music would you just send a quick intro and 3 of your best tracks to as many contacts as you can? Thanks for the help!!
Old 1 day ago
  #109
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
Obviously I wouldn't send a library that specializes in indie rock a edm album
You touched on a very good point that I think a lot of composers don't really recognize at first...

when doing music licensing for film. Most libraries do ALL styles of music... but it's HOW they do them that differs from one market segment to the next.

So it's not so much the genre...it's the arrangement. Does your Indie rock track or your EDM track or your orchestral track or your jazz track have a short 4 bar or 2 bar intro? or does it have a 45 second intro? Does your track have lots of breaks with stops and starts or does the cue play continuously nonstop throughout? Does your track end on the same section of music that you started? Does your track have a tight hit for an ending or does it have a long drawn out sustained ring out? Or does it fade out? Does your track end at the dynamic climax or do you play for another 8 to 16 bars at a quieter dynamic after the climax before ending? Does your track actually have a written "composed" ending or does it just stop? does your track have a written "composed" intro or does it just start?

Most of what the libraries are looking for are these types of things... not so much genres. There are very few "genre" specific catalogs. There are a lot more "use" specific catalogs. For example, the UK catalog Deep East has a catalog they make called "Zest" and a catalog called "Scorched Score".

Deep East Music

the tag line for Zest is "The Happiest Music in the World", or something like that. When you listen to Zest, what do you think? They have Hiphop, rock, swing, orchestral music, lounge music, etc... but there is one thing that ties it all together... All of the albums, regardless of genre, are all geared towards TV commercials.

Listen to Scorched Score... what do you think that is music for? Trailers. DEM itself is a general purpose catalog and has a little bit of everything in it from music for promos to music for trailers to music for TV commercial to music for corporate A/V to music for in-show.

Video Helper has their main library called "Video Helper" which is specifically for Promos. But they also have a library called "Score Helper". What do you think that is for? in-show underscore and some trailers.

Killer tracks has Killer Animation, Killer Promos, Killer Scores, Killer Artist Series, etc...

each catalog is produced and maintained by a different person (or people) that understand the needs of that specific market segment that the catalog is targeting.

So it's not really about Genre. It's about who can use the music based on the way it's currently arranged and produced.
Old 1 day ago
  #110
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
You touched on a very good point that I think a lot of composers don't really recognize at first...

when doing music licensing for film. Most libraries do ALL styles of music... but it's HOW they do them that differs from one market segment to the next.

So it's not so much the genre...it's the arrangement. Does your Indie rock track or your EDM track or your orchestral track or your jazz track have a short 4 bar or 2 bar intro? or does it have a 45 second intro? Does your track have lots of breaks with stops and starts or does the cue play continuously nonstop throughout? Does your track end on the same section of music that you started? Does your track have a tight hit for an ending or does it have a long drawn out sustained ring out? Or does it fade out? Does your track end at the dynamic climax or do you play for another 8 to 16 bars at a quieter dynamic after the climax before ending? Does your track actually have a written "composed" ending or does it just stop? does your track have a written "composed" intro or does it just start?

Most of what the libraries are looking for are these types of things... not so much genres. There are very few "genre" specific catalogs. There are a lot more "use" specific catalogs. For example, the UK catalog Deep East has a catalog they make called "Zest" and a catalog called "Scorched Score".

Deep East Music

the tag line for Zest is "The Happiest Music in the World", or something like that. When you listen to Zest, what do you think? They have Hiphop, rock, swing, orchestral music, lounge music, etc... but there is one thing that ties it all together... All of the albums, regardless of genre, are all geared towards TV commercials.

Listen to Scorched Score... what do you think that is music for? Trailers. DEM itself is a general purpose catalog and has a little bit of everything in it from music for promos to music for trailers to music for TV commercial to music for corporate A/V to music for in-show.

Video Helper has their main library called "Video Helper" which is specifically for Promos. But they also have a library called "Score Helper". What do you think that is for? in-show underscore and some trailers.

Killer tracks has Killer Animation, Killer Promos, Killer Scores, Killer Artist Series, etc...

each catalog is produced and maintained by a different person (or people) that understand the needs of that specific market segment that the catalog is targeting.

So it's not really about Genre. It's about who can use the music based on the way it's currently arranged and produced.
So all this being said how would I pitch my music to each company?
Old 1 day ago
  #111
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
So all this being said how would I pitch my music to each company?
Maybe work with an agency.
Old 21 hours ago
  #112
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
So all this being said how would I pitch my music to each company?
Wait for it.............COLD CALL
Old 19 hours ago
  #113
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
So all this being said how would I pitch my music to each company?
If you have to ask that question at this point after reading through what has already been written then Desire might have a point. Hire someone to do it for you so you can focus on making the music and someone else can focus on marketing it for you.
Old 18 hours ago
  #114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
If you have to ask that question at this point after reading through what has already been written then Desire might have a point. Hire someone to do it for you so you can focus on making the music and someone else can focus on marketing it for you.
That is exactly why I suggested he work with an agent.

You practically gave away the farm for free and he just kind of asked "so who do I sell my fruits and vegetables to?".

I know the business end of the music business is not fun. It can be painfully boring for some. So working with someone who has the enthusiasm and experience to promote, market, and sell music works best.

@DiggingForRoots, looks for an agency to help you with selling your music. Let them handle all of the grunt work and stay focused on making great music!
Old 18 hours ago
  #115
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
 

If you need an agent I suggest you give up now and find a different career. it doesn't take a rocket scientist to do as JohnF suggests and cold call people. It just takes determination. And if you can't do that, then you will NOT survive this biz. Guaranteed. 100%.

Plus, you can't get an agent unless you don't need them. Most successful composers I know don't need agents at all other than to do their negotiating for them. I suppose you can get someone to cold call FOR you and call them your agent, but it's not a real agent.

Bottom line is as Etch mentioned, if you've read thru this entire thread and can't figure out how to get your music out there, then you might want to rethink things. It doesn't take a rocket scientist - just determination.
Old 3 hours ago
  #116
Gear Maniac
I do not need an agent. My day job is a sales person for a very large music company. I can cold call all day if that is the answer. I'm already in some pretty big libraries I was just looking for advice on how to get in with the big boys like killer tracks or extreme music who both said they are not taking submissions at this time. But if cold calling is the answer then cold calling it is.
Old 2 hours ago
  #117
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggingForRoots View Post
I do not need an agent. My day job is a sales person for a very large music company. I can cold call all day if that is the answer. I'm already in some pretty big libraries I was just looking for advice on how to get in with the big boys like killer tracks or extreme music who both said they are not taking submissions at this time. But if cold calling is the answer then cold calling it is.
Well, killer is starting to become more like an APM sort of thing, so to get into killer your best bet is to write for one the libraries they represent.

Extreme is never actively looking for new composers. In order to get in there you have to start by cowriting with an existing extreme composer, or you meet one of the executives face to face at an event and you impress the hell out of them... Or you become famous. With extreme, when you say you do funk and R&B they explain that quincy jones and Rodney jerkins does all their r&b, when you say you do hip hop they say snoop dogg does most of their hiphop. When you say you do score, they say hans Zimmer does most of their score stuff...

So what they are telling you is "we have the best, most famous ppl writing for us, so unless you are better and bigger then them, why would we hire you?" Lol
Old 55 minutes ago
  #118
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desire Inspires View Post
That is exactly why I suggested he work with an agent.
Kraft-Engel, WME, CAA, Gorfaine/Schwartz, Evolution, et al, aren't looking to represent a part time composer that's wanting to sign with libraries. It's probably been mentioned but the only time an agent comes into play for composers is to help composers choose their projects wisely, as well as performing all of the negotiations and legalities. And cold calling agencies will not provide any results if you don't have serious credits.

Unlike actors, agents only deal with composers after said composer has made a name for himself and already has credits. Furthermore, I know several working composers that have never had an agent because of their relationship with directors and producers.
Old 28 minutes ago
  #119
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post

So what they are telling you is "we have the best, most famous ppl writing for us, so unless you are better and bigger then them, why would we hire you?" Lol
Well you could use benedict cumberbatch's line from the Immigration Game "Hire me and let me take a crack at it and then you will know for sure.. "

lol
Old 4 minutes ago
  #120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike P View Post
Kraft-Engel, WME, CAA, Gorfaine/Schwartz, Evolution, et al, aren't looking to represent a part time composer that's wanting to sign with libraries. It's probably been mentioned but the only time an agent comes into play for composers is to help composers choose their projects wisely, as well as performing all of the negotiations and legalities. And cold calling agencies will not provide any results if you don't have serious credits.

Unlike actors, agents only deal with composers after said composer has made a name for himself and already has credits. Furthermore, I know several working composers that have never had an agent because of their relationship with directors and producers.
Yes, I know this.

But if @DiggingForRoots is going to ignore all of the other great practical advice given here, he may as well go after the impossible!
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