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Old 2 days ago
  #31
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by librarymusictips View Post
Yo John, please tell me how to make millions in this industry.

Thanks.
$100,000 per quarter in writers PRO monies
$100,000 per quarter in publishers PRO monies
$200,000 per year in syncs/upfront WFH fees etc..

Or any combo thereof

It's like that game Othello, easy to learn, hard to master..

1) Cut ALL negativity out of your life. Every musician I know who used to complain about streaming, make fun of their spotify royalties etc.. etc.. is now working full time in Real Estate, legal weed or SEO consulting. All of the millionaire musicians i know are FOCUSED. An exception to this is when a certain PRO lowered the background vocal rates overnight, in the middle of two payment periods. That was unacceptable and more underhanded than a BMG exec who used to work at APM after a career in loan sharking (no disrespect to loan sharks).

2) Build your brand. At least two big money libraries are active on this forum. They know you as "librarymusictips"....they know me as JohnFulford. I made $25K last year from those libraries' up front fees, not counting the backend which should come. Your music might be better than mine, you might be more fun to hang out with, but they know my name and hired me.

3) Make music better than your competition. I get so many submissions from musicians that use the same tired ass RMX Loops, Apple Loops, Sylenth patches number 1-1 1-6 and 1-42. As soon as i hear that played out RMX hi hat loop that you can hear in most episodes of Locked Up Abroad, i lose the musicians number and go out of my way never to speak with them again. It's a waste of time.

4) Cold call EVERYDAY. Only cold email if you can't reach the person on the phone in a timely fashion.

5) No lucrative "day gig" that has nothing to do with music. Working at Starbucks or Chipotle is fine. An "easy come, easy go" job should be enough to pay the bills for a year or two while you get your production music revenue streams up to par.

6) Hit the town. I met literally 6 new music industry people in the last 24 hours. I have to get better at this, since it's super easy to hang around the studio all day doing music and paperwork etc..

I got some new custom John Fulford x New Era snapback hats. UPS delivered them last night and i hit a rock show downtown. The 4 people who complimented me on the hat got a free hat. Two people i had met that night for the first time. One was from Secret Road, a company routinely mentioned in this forum for landing lucrative syncs and being especially hard to "get in with".

Walking to my car i saw two gents who i recognized from a pre-Grammy party I attended last week. I walked up to them and introduced myself. Two new contacts.

Today at the Beverly Center i was getting something gift wrapped. Two gentlemen were in the elevator, one had a hat on featuring a treble clef. I asked if he did music, surprisingly he designed the treble clef hat himself. I was wearing my Fulford x New Era hat (it says MUSIC on the front in a large font).

Turns out they're both published R&B songwriters who had a single come out last Friday. I went on iTunes and bought the single. Their manager should be in contact for some TV/Film work i can hire them for..
Old 2 days ago
  #32
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
 

I suggest a class on "How to make 100,00k a year, not work as hard as JohnF, and live somewhere nicer than LA". LOL

John, I think you working way too hard.
Old 2 days ago
  #33
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnFulford View Post
$100,000 per quarter in writers PRO monies
$100,000 per quarter in publishers PRO monies
$200,000 per year in syncs/upfront WFH fees etc..

Or any combo thereof

It's like that game Othello, easy to learn, hard to master..

1) Cut ALL negativity out of your life. Every musician I know who used to complain about streaming, make fun of their spotify royalties etc.. etc.. is now working full time in Real Estate, legal weed or SEO consulting. All of the millionaire musicians i know are FOCUSED. An exception to this is when a certain PRO lowered the background vocal rates overnight, in the middle of two payment periods. That was unacceptable and more underhanded than a BMG exec who used to work at APM after a career in loan sharking (no disrespect to loan sharks).

2) Build your brand. At least two big money libraries are active on this forum. They know you as "librarymusictips"....they know me as JohnFulford. I made $25K last year from those libraries' up front fees, not counting the backend which should come. Your music might be better than mine, you might be more fun to hang out with, but they know my name and hired me.

3) Make music better than your competition. I get so many submissions from musicians that use the same tired ass RMX Loops, Apple Loops, Sylenth patches number 1-1 1-6 and 1-42. As soon as i hear that played out RMX hi hat loop that you can hear in most episodes of Locked Up Abroad, i lose the musicians number and go out of my way never to speak with them again. It's a waste of time.

4) Cold call EVERYDAY. Only cold email if you can't reach the person on the phone in a timely fashion.

5) No lucrative "day gig" that has nothing to do with music. Working at Starbucks or Chipotle is fine. An "easy come, easy go" job should be enough to pay the bills for a year or two while you get your production music revenue streams up to par.

6) Hit the town. I met literally 6 new music industry people in the last 24 hours. I have to get better at this, since it's super easy to hang around the studio all day doing music and paperwork etc..

I got some new custom John Fulford x New Era snapback hats. UPS delivered them last night and i hit a rock show downtown. The 4 people who complimented me on the hat got a free hat. Two people i had met that night for the first time. One was from Secret Road, a company routinely mentioned in this forum for landing lucrative syncs and being especially hard to "get in with".

Walking to my car i saw two gents who i recognized from a pre-Grammy party I attended last week. I walked up to them and introduced myself. Two new contacts.

Today at the Beverly Center i was getting something gift wrapped. Two gentlemen were in the elevator, one had a hat on featuring a treble clef. I asked if he did music, surprisingly he designed the treble clef hat himself. I was wearing my Fulford x New Era hat (it says MUSIC on the front in a large font).

Turns out they're both published R&B songwriters who had a single come out last Friday. I went on iTunes and bought the single. Their manager should be in contact for some TV/Film work i can hire them for..
Thanks for the tips John. I can see what I've been doing wrong all these years now!

1) - You make a great point! I am really positive and focused and would never make fun of Spotify royalties. EVER! Being an optimist, I look at the BIG picture! I see 0.00000034 pence as being a small slice of a big cake, rather than just a miniature blueberry muffin.

2) - Unfortunately, I didn't realize there were 2 major players who come on here. Can you tell me who they are and I will try and impress them with some of my Locked Up Abroad cues? Thanks.

3) - My music is alright. Not better than some of the competition but better than some of the competition. But if the ultimate goal was to be better than all the competition, there would be just one composer left standing wouldn't there? I am not sure if it logically possible for everyone to be better than the competition.

4) - I never cold called ever! I am just crap on the phone due to my unfortunate speech impediment (I am unable to pronounce the letter 'm'). I dunno how Extreme would feel about me cold calling everyday but I will give it a go next week and report back!

5) - My overnight pizza delivery job allows me to spend the days cataloguing Apple Loops, honing my Stylus patterns and polishing my Sylenth patches. So there is much to be said for a non-music related job that allows time to do all those wonderful things.

6) - I will hit the town! However, being based in Stornoway this does present some problems as my town has a population of 56 - 34 of whom are sheep farmers. Nevertheless, I will get some T-Shirts made with 'Library Music Tipz' on the front and 'COOL BEATZ" on the back and distribute them to the church choir and members of the local Rotary club.

My last attempt at networking was somewhat unsuccessful :( I recall going to our local Spar store and stocking up on Sellotape. Whereupon, I engaged the young lady behind the counter in conversation and told her about library music. She said she was very fond of libraries and thanked me for reminding her her Harry Potter book was overdue. I looked at her quizzically and said: 'fine'.

"56 pence!" came the reply. You can imagine my confusion at this point and so I made my excuses and left. I haven't networked since tbh.
Old 2 days ago
  #34
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by librarymusictips View Post
Thanks for the tips John. I can see what I've been doing wrong all these years now!

1) - You make a great point! I am really positive and focused and would never make fun of Spotify royalties. EVER! Being an optimist, I look at the BIG picture! I see 0.00000034 pence as being a small slice of a big cake, rather than just a miniature blueberry muffin.

2) - Unfortunately, I didn't realize there were 2 major players who come on here. Can you tell me who they are and I will try and impress them with some of my Locked Up Abroad cues? Thanks.

3) - My music is alright. Not better than some of the competition but better than some of the competition. But if the ultimate goal was to be better than all the competition, there would be just one composer left standing wouldn't there? I am not sure if it logically possible for everyone to be better than the competition.

4) - I never cold called ever! I am just crap on the phone due to my unfortunate speech impediment (I am unable to pronounce the letter 'm'). I dunno how Extreme would feel about me cold calling everyday but I will give it a go next week and report back!

5) - My overnight pizza delivery job allows me to spend the days cataloguing Apple Loops, honing my Stylus patterns and polishing my Sylenth patches. So there is much to be said for a non-music related job that allows time to do all those wonderful things.

6) - I will hit the town! However, being based in Stornoway this does present some problems as my town has a population of 56 - 34 of whom are sheep farmers. Nevertheless, I will get some T-Shirts made with 'Library Music Tipz' on the front and 'COOL BEATZ" on the back and distribute them to the church choir and members of the local Rotary club.

My last attempt at networking was somewhat unsuccessful :( I recall going to our local Spar store and stocking up on Sellotape. Whereupon, I engaged the young lady behind the counter in conversation and told her about library music. She said she was very fond of libraries and thanked me for reminding her her Harry Potter book was overdue. I looked at her quizzically and said: 'fine'.

"56 pence!" came the reply. You can imagine my confusion at this point and so I made my excuses and left. I haven't networked since tbh.
If you had a better attitude I'm sure the big money library folks on this forum would reach out
Old 2 days ago
  #35
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnFulford View Post
If you had a better attitude I'm sure the big money library folks on this forum would reach out
Yes John, thanks! Let's hope so!

I am desperate to break 3 figures in 2017.
Old 2 days ago
  #36
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Since the ASCAP board elections are coming up, how about a panel on how we can dominate the boards and have a bigger voice in decision making at the PRO's. We dominate music plays on TV and other formats, yet the payouts are still shrouded in mystery and the ever elusive "premium use." The reason I get a crapload of music from international PRO's every year is becuase they just pay what they pay, doesn't matter if it's U2, Sting, or me. Not so in the US. We need to get the old guard, protecting their old songwriting catalogs out. How can we organize? How can we truly make a difference? We basically need a board of 75% Doug Wood.
Old 2 days ago
  #37
Lives for gear
 
Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by VitaEtMusica View Post
How can we organize?
the PMA.
Old 2 days ago
  #38
Lives for gear
 
Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnFulford View Post
$100,000 per quarter in writers PRO monies
$100,000 per quarter in publishers PRO monies
$200,000 per year in syncs/upfront WFH fees etc..

Or any combo thereof

It's like that game Othello, easy to learn, hard to master..

1) Cut ALL negativity out of your life. Every musician I know who used to complain about streaming, make fun of their spotify royalties etc.. etc.. is now working full time in Real Estate, legal weed or SEO consulting. All of the millionaire musicians i know are FOCUSED. An exception to this is when a certain PRO lowered the background vocal rates overnight, in the middle of two payment periods. That was unacceptable and more underhanded than a BMG exec who used to work at APM after a career in loan sharking (no disrespect to loan sharks).

2) Build your brand. At least two big money libraries are active on this forum. They know you as "librarymusictips"....they know me as JohnFulford. I made $25K last year from those libraries' up front fees, not counting the backend which should come. Your music might be better than mine, you might be more fun to hang out with, but they know my name and hired me.

3) Make music better than your competition. I get so many submissions from musicians that use the same tired ass RMX Loops, Apple Loops, Sylenth patches number 1-1 1-6 and 1-42. As soon as i hear that played out RMX hi hat loop that you can hear in most episodes of Locked Up Abroad, i lose the musicians number and go out of my way never to speak with them again. It's a waste of time.

4) Cold call EVERYDAY. Only cold email if you can't reach the person on the phone in a timely fashion.

5) No lucrative "day gig" that has nothing to do with music. Working at Starbucks or Chipotle is fine. An "easy come, easy go" job should be enough to pay the bills for a year or two while you get your production music revenue streams up to par.

6) Hit the town. I met literally 6 new music industry people in the last 24 hours. I have to get better at this, since it's super easy to hang around the studio all day doing music and paperwork etc..

I got some new custom John Fulford x New Era snapback hats. UPS delivered them last night and i hit a rock show downtown. The 4 people who complimented me on the hat got a free hat. Two people i had met that night for the first time. One was from Secret Road, a company routinely mentioned in this forum for landing lucrative syncs and being especially hard to "get in with".

Walking to my car i saw two gents who i recognized from a pre-Grammy party I attended last week. I walked up to them and introduced myself. Two new contacts.

Today at the Beverly Center i was getting something gift wrapped. Two gentlemen were in the elevator, one had a hat on featuring a treble clef. I asked if he did music, surprisingly he designed the treble clef hat himself. I was wearing my Fulford x New Era hat (it says MUSIC on the front in a large font).

Turns out they're both published R&B songwriters who had a single come out last Friday. I went on iTunes and bought the single. Their manager should be in contact for some TV/Film work i can hire them for..
This right here is "gold". The moderators should literally make this post from John a sticky. Heck, John I am going to recommend you moderate a panel on this very topic!!! the title can be something like "What networking REALLY means: the keys to successfully getting music placed and making money in the music licensing/library space".
Old 2 days ago
  #39
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
the PMA.
Meh. I saw what happened at the PMC. Not impressed. Even the guys they had in talking as keynotes and arguing for the consent decree weren't even from the music library industry. WTF? It's the same **** that happens with the PRO's. Are we supposed to be starstruck by the a film composer and a lead singer of a band? Gotta really get organized and talking solutions, not just bitching.
Old 2 days ago
  #40
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
the PMA.
Another thing I hate about the PMA is the members' propensity for saying one thing, then doing another when they break from their huddle. In the end, it's every man for himself in the PMA.
Old 2 days ago
  #41
Lives for gear
 
Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by librarymusictips View Post
6) - I will hit the town! However, being based in Stornoway this does present some problems as my town has a population of 56 - 34 of whom are sheep farmers.
Even though you are being sarcastic, this does bring up a good point for a lot of people reading this forum. So I'm going to use this comment as a spring board to talk about this situation that a lot of people find themselves in.

You write phenomenal music. you have tons of chops. but you live east of the middle of nowhere... what do you do?

This is something I realized in my teens. Work is NEVER going to come to you. You have to go to it. You have to HUSTLE to get it. doesn't matter if you want to work in software, telecommunications, government, film/TV, music, aerospace, robotics, etc.

I have a friend that has his PhD in artificial intelligence/neural networks/robotics. He also has about 4 or 5 bachelor's degrees and I think about 4 master's degrees before he went for his PhD. What did he have to do for his PhD?? He had to !@#$ing move to Japan and learn japanese! Why? Because that is where all the cutting edge research, development and advancements are happening for that field.

I know a few other people that are really into technology and the web. They all have startups... What did they do? They !@#$ing moved to San Fransisco and open shop in silicon valley.

I know A TON of musicians, composers, sound engineers, songwriters... What did all of them do??? they all !@#$ing moved to Los Angeles. And actually, a few of them after becoming successful here in LA have since moved out of LA. A couple have moved to Nashville now... Dr Bill moved to Arizona... I know one guy who moved to Austin. BUT!!! they all started here and became successful here in LA.

I am not from Los Angeles. I am from Boston. If I stayed in Boston, I would be working at a software company or a college doing IT or Administration, and I would be playing music at dive bars on the weekends for $25~$50 per night. How do I know this? Because LITERALLY every other person that I know from the music scene back in Boston that stayed there, is doing that. Two guys are firefighters, one guy is a system admin and salesforce database programmer for a very large university in boston, another is a forensic IT guy for a huge law firm. Two guys I know are engineers (one software, the other civil). And so on.

Yet... I took that leap of faith and moved to LA... and so what do I do? Am I a system admin? Am I a civil engineer? am I a firefighter/EMT? No... I am a music producer, sound engineer and composer. And that is what I do for a living, nothing else.

How could I accomplish this miraculous feat that most people only dream of? I put myself in front of the eight ball and made it happen. I HAD to move to where the work is. I had to get myself out there and meet people, and make friends and make connections. Everything John mentions in his post all of us had to do and continue to do every day. That is a big part of the job.

Yes, the internet is connecting us all on a much bigger scale, so now we can do business with people around the world. But face to face is still super important. Amber and Jazz4 and I met face to face when I went to London... John Fulford posted some videos a couple months ago about his trip to south east asia where he was setting up sub publishing deals for himself.

So even though you can email and Skype... nothing is more powerful and important than face to face. And when you are looking to start getting into the business... you need to be face to face every day... so you HAVE to go where the work is.

You cannot live in "Stornoway" (or any small remote town) and expect to have the world rushing to your door to hire you. It just doesn't work like that. When you are out of sight, you are unfortunately out of mind. So you need to be in sight, every day.

Anyway... rant over... I guess I should add this topic as one of the bullet points for John's panel!
Old 2 days ago
  #42
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Etch-A-Sketch's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by VitaEtMusica View Post
Another thing I hate about the PMA is the members' propensity for saying one thing, then doing another when they break from their huddle. In the end, it's every man for himself in the PMA.
Well yeah, it's not a trade union. It's like the RIAA... or think of it like a Super PAC. It's the place where we can all focus our energy to lobby on behalf of the industry... when the PMA starts to try and set guidelines for "rules" for operating businesses within the industry it can't really work. But as a lobby, it can be very effective.

That is how the PMA was formed originally... and they lobbied ASCAP and were EXTREMELY successful. Now if they can get hundreds of thousands of composers to join together with them in lobbying ASCAP and BMI... just imagine how powerful that will be. Imagine if ALL the PMA libraries and composers approached ASCAP together and said, "change this or we are all moving to SESAC immediately". They would FREAK! One all of us one at a time threaten to do something like that it has very little weight... when all of us together threaten to do it... watch out.
Old 2 days ago
  #43
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
Well yeah, it's not a trade union. It's like the RIAA... or think of it like a Super PAC. It's the place where we can all focus our energy to lobby on behalf of the industry... when the PMA starts to try and set guidelines for "rules" for operating businesses within the industry it can't really work. But as a lobby, it can be very effective.

That is how the PMA was formed originally... and they lobbied ASCAP and were EXTREMELY successful. Now if they can get hundreds of thousands of composers to join together with them in lobbying ASCAP and BMI... just imagine how powerful that will be. Imagine if ALL the PMA libraries and composers approached ASCAP together and said, "change this or we are all moving to SESAC immediately". They would FREAK! One all of us one at a time threaten to do something like that it has very little weight... when all of us together threaten to do it... watch out.
I get it. When UMPG did it, they didn't seem to care much... in public anyway. I guess my point is, why get together and talk about doing things a certain way as good business practice, then go out and do something different? Retitling, direct licenses, enterprise deals, etc, etc, etc. It seems like a massive waste of time and effort. I don't really have any solutions, so my best path forward seems to be- screw everyone else, we're here to make money by any means. That seems to be the MO of all the major players at the PMA. Hey, everyone play by this set of rules, but we'll do our own thing and mess you all over. Screw that.
Old 2 days ago
  #44
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by VitaEtMusica View Post
Since the ASCAP board elections are coming up, how about a panel on how we can dominate the boards and have a bigger voice in decision making at the PRO's. We dominate music plays on TV and other formats, yet the payouts are still shrouded in mystery and the ever elusive "premium use." The reason I get a crapload of music from international PRO's every year is becuase they just pay what they pay, doesn't matter if it's U2, Sting, or me. Not so in the US. We need to get the old guard, protecting their old songwriting catalogs out. How can we organize? How can we truly make a difference? We basically need a board of 75% Doug Wood.
I second this wholeheartedly, and would ask BMI to the table as well.
Old 1 day ago
  #45
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
I know A TON of musicians, composers, sound engineers, songwriters... What did all of them do??? they all !@#$ing moved to Los Angeles. And actually, a few of them after becoming successful here in LA have since moved out of LA. A couple have moved to Nashville now... Dr Bill moved to Arizona... I know one guy who moved to Austin. BUT!!! they all started here and became successful here in LA.
This is absolutely true. (but come on Etch - NORTHERN AZ. I like the desert, but I don't want to LIVE there. )

But moving to LA will not automatically net you a career. Moving to LA and pulling a "John Fulford" (networking and cold calling) might well get you there though. I don't think most will see 7 figures though. There are EXTREMELY talented people in LA who are barely making it that should be replacing the A call composers out there. They are literally THAT good - and yet - barely making it. Being in LA is almost crucial for a feature film composer that's starting out - but there are a lot of variables that come into play which will determine your success much more than talent will.

Now, in opposition to what I just said, "being successful" in the music biz is not necessarily the best thing ever. I know many many very miserable composers, musicians, directors, etc. that have "made it big" and are NOT loving life. Personally, I am exponentially happier, more fulfilled in life, having more fun, and experiencing "LIFE" much more outside of LA. But, yes, I did get successful in LA first.....


PS - I must echo Etch's "face to face" comments. The internet is a nice start, but nothing moves you forward like personal real relationships.
Old 22 hours ago
  #46
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnFulford View Post
$100,000 per quarter in writers PRO monies
$100,000 per quarter in publishers PRO monies
$200,000 per year in syncs/upfront WFH fees etc..

Or any combo thereof

It's like that game Othello, easy to learn, hard to master..

1) Cut ALL negativity out of your life. Every musician I know who used to complain about streaming, make fun of their spotify royalties etc.. etc.. is now working full time in Real Estate, legal weed or SEO consulting. All of the millionaire musicians i know are FOCUSED. An exception to this is when a certain PRO lowered the background vocal rates overnight, in the middle of two payment periods. That was unacceptable and more underhanded than a BMG exec who used to work at APM after a career in loan sharking (no disrespect to loan sharks).

2) Build your brand. At least two big money libraries are active on this forum. They know you as "librarymusictips"....they know me as JohnFulford. I made $25K last year from those libraries' up front fees, not counting the backend which should come. Your music might be better than mine, you might be more fun to hang out with, but they know my name and hired me.

3) Make music better than your competition. I get so many submissions from musicians that use the same tired ass RMX Loops, Apple Loops, Sylenth patches number 1-1 1-6 and 1-42. As soon as i hear that played out RMX hi hat loop that you can hear in most episodes of Locked Up Abroad, i lose the musicians number and go out of my way never to speak with them again. It's a waste of time.

4) Cold call EVERYDAY. Only cold email if you can't reach the person on the phone in a timely fashion.

5) No lucrative "day gig" that has nothing to do with music. Working at Starbucks or Chipotle is fine. An "easy come, easy go" job should be enough to pay the bills for a year or two while you get your production music revenue streams up to par.

6) Hit the town. I met literally 6 new music industry people in the last 24 hours. I have to get better at this, since it's super easy to hang around the studio all day doing music and paperwork etc..

I got some new custom John Fulford x New Era snapback hats. UPS delivered them last night and i hit a rock show downtown. The 4 people who complimented me on the hat got a free hat. Two people i had met that night for the first time. One was from Secret Road, a company routinely mentioned in this forum for landing lucrative syncs and being especially hard to "get in with".

Walking to my car i saw two gents who i recognized from a pre-Grammy party I attended last week. I walked up to them and introduced myself. Two new contacts.

Today at the Beverly Center i was getting something gift wrapped. Two gentlemen were in the elevator, one had a hat on featuring a treble clef. I asked if he did music, surprisingly he designed the treble clef hat himself. I was wearing my Fulford x New Era hat (it says MUSIC on the front in a large font).

Turns out they're both published R&B songwriters who had a single come out last Friday. I went on iTunes and bought the single. Their manager should be in contact for some TV/Film work i can hire them for..
LOL ... you're an energy bunny.
Old 9 hours ago
  #47
Moderator
 
narcoman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by peter5992 View Post
LOL ... you're an energy bunny.
yes he is - and its a common trait amongst those in the biz who are making any decent money. I've talked at a lot of panel over the last 18 months and gave a keynote one month ago. Its been the common thread running through all of my talks; "your talent doesn't matter. "

Always gets a shock response but I do generally clarify it - it's also about the work that goes with it, John Fulford style....
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