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Sync Music Probz
Old 15th July 2019
  #1
Gear Head
 

Sync Music Probz

Hello all! I am very close to quitting music as a profession. Before I go, I thought I would ask for advice on here. I recently signed up for a very expensive online class that teaches one how to sell their music through sync. It ended up not being what I thought it would be, and now I am left broke and back to square one. I signed up for Splice and made an album full of good material but found out using splice in your music and trying to sell it for sync isn't a good idea. On top of all this I was told I am not a good enough producer and I need to spend MORE money with that as well.

I'm at the point where I don't know where to invest my time or money.

Do I take a REAL college class on producing and mastering music or do I just find someone to pay? Do I make music for TV/Movies, or ADs and trailers? Do I invest in plugins for fake instruments or can I use Splice to add real elements? Is it REALLY possible to make music with sync if you can't make your music 100% on your own?

Thanks in advance guys. Totally venting rn ready to go back to listening to music instead of creating
Old 15th July 2019
  #2
Mrx
Gear Addict
 

There seems to be this idea knocking about that success should come easy. I think most people who have accomplished the goals they set out to accomplish are well versed in the art of being rejected.
My recommendation is you determine for yourself whether you really love doing this enough, if yes then it's time to go to work. Stop focussing on making money, instead focus on getting better. How you get better is by keep doing it over and over again over a number of years. Listen to a lot of music, watch a lot of tv, become familiar with the various approaches, gradually upgrade your gear etc. Take courses if you need to. Making music whether you get paid or not can be the most rewarding thing you'll ever do but if making money is in the driving seat then frankly there are probably easier ways of doing it. The stock market springs to mind.
Old 15th July 2019
  #3
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
FWIW...

You seem to have missed the main point.

Learn how to make good music first. That's what's important, not so much the producing and certainly not the mastering. You can't master a turd can you? Well, I guess you can but would you want to.

Study an instrument in depth. Learn theory. Read music. Listen to the masters. Listen to Ravel's orchestration. Listen to the score from Predator. Listen to a Rachmaninov prelude. Listen to Glen Gould or Perlman playing Bach. Understand how this music makes an emotional connection. Learn about...MUSIC.

Anyone can do the other stuff or use samples put together by someone else. That's not making music. That's fakery. Online courses? BS. Just a way of dudes that never made it making some easy money from desperate newbies.

The actual 'making good music' process seems to be a forgotten art as people become obsessed in putting 1000s of trax into some black hole of nothingness.

If you wanna make a career, make real music from the heart.

But that requires considerable study, dedication and effort.

IMO.

Good luck tho. Sorry to hear you are close to quitting. Maybe you just need to come at it from a different angle. I have been there and I know the pain but my career took a turn for the better when I concentrated on making 'real' music, with real players, playing real instruments and imparting emotional depth.

My Gran can knock up a track using splice. My cat probably could too for that matter.
Wow. Thank you for this face slap. I guess I just want to "do it all" to be a one stop for licensing while not realizing the value of music theory. I play by ear and compose music note by note using the midi "piano roll" tool in logic, not thinking I would need to know how to write or read sheet music and rely solely on ear.

I can produce something 70% of the way to professional (my teacher said), which leaves me still needing a mixer AND a master-er while feeling so close to being able to do it on my own. That's when I find myself asking "if im this close, shouldnt i just learn myself? wouldnt it be more cost effective to not have to hire someone to finish every single song I make?"
Old 15th July 2019
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
Learn how to make good music first.
It all starts with this.
Old 15th July 2019
  #5
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrx View Post
There seems to be this idea knocking about that success should come easy. I think most people who have accomplished the goals they set out to accomplish are well versed in the art of being rejected.
My recommendation is you determine for yourself whether you really love doing this enough, if yes then it's time to go to work. Stop focussing on making money, instead focus on getting better. How you get better is by keep doing it over and over again over a number of years. Listen to a lot of music, watch a lot of tv, become familiar with the various approaches, gradually upgrade your gear etc. Take courses if you need to. Making music whether you get paid or not can be the most rewarding thing you'll ever do but if making money is in the driving seat then frankly there are probably easier ways of doing it. The stock market springs to mind.
Very true. Sometimes it feels that the amount of time doing music takes away from other things isn't smart to do unless it helps make one money.

I am at my miserable desk day job and get impatient trying to work on music after working all day just to be rejected and end up back at this desk.
Old 15th July 2019
  #6
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desire Inspires View Post
It all starts with this.
Fair. Having awesome music may not guarantee success though (always playing devils advocate ha). Music industry feels like so much luck is involved. I guess I'm very eager to put in hard work, but everyone who's making it seems to have their thing whether it be "trailer music" or "TV music" and so their efforts work towards something consistent and reliable.

Being diverse seems to be important, but even the most diverse must have their shtick. No one can make good music of all types, right?
Old 15th July 2019
  #7
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
It's not about creating awesome music.

The point I was trying to make is that it's about making 'real' music, music from the heart, with passion etc. so that you can communicate some kind of emotion to the listener. It's about the listening experience. If someone is engaged with what you do on an emotional level, they will buy it/listen to it/licence it etc. The other option is to turn out mass produced dross. But I don't see any shortage of that kinda stuff tbh.

Record a real upright piano (even on your phone in a pub), play some slow, simple chords, get a viloinst in from the local uni music department to play a few long notes over the top.

You have some real music.
I see. Right on! Would you be against the idea of making music using virtual symphonies like EastWests? (Also thank you for your time responding)
Old 15th July 2019
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
Fair. Having awesome music may not guarantee success though (always playing devils advocate ha). Music industry feels like so much luck is involved. I guess I'm very eager to put in hard work, but everyone who's making it seems to have their thing whether it be "trailer music" or "TV music" and so their efforts work towards something consistent and reliable.

Being diverse seems to be important, but even the most diverse must have their shtick. No one can make good music of all types, right?
Right, right.

Let us hear your music.
Old 16th July 2019
  #9
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
I can produce something 70% of the way to professional
Just a side comment. When you get to 80-90%, every 2% "better" comes with exponential cost, and exponential time commitment. The last steps are the hardest.

Good luck in your decisions. Music is a lifelong journey. I've got a university bachelors degree in composition and been doing it many decades, and still feel like there are more things I don't know than I know.

Either get on it, or find an easier way to make $$$. (note : virtually any other path is easier than making a living in music.)
Old 16th July 2019
  #10
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
Music industry feels like so much luck is involved.
For me, luck "happens" when hard work, talent, incredible amounts of time, energy and money intersect with opportunity. Simple as that. Could take years. Decades even. But when you have the talent, the experience, work incredibly hard for incalculable hours and are then presented with an opportunity that took lots of $$$ to survive until that moment.....then.....

BAM!!!!!!!!! Luck happens.


Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
Being diverse seems to be important, but even the most diverse must have their shtick. No one can make good music of all types, right?
This is somewhat true. As a composer, I definitely have my strengths and weaknesses, but I can pull off pretty much any style off given the budget and time to get it done. The more single genre focused you are, the less longevity you will have in the biz - all other things considered. Being versatile and enjoying and knowing how to make many styles is not only fun, but it brings the financial rewards as well. Diversity is key to my longevity. No doubt.
Old 16th July 2019
  #11
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
Hello all! I am very close to quitting music as a profession. Before I go, I thought I would ask for advice on here. I recently signed up for a very expensive online class that teaches one how to sell their music through sync. It ended up not being what I thought it would be, and now I am left broke and back to square one. I signed up for Splice and made an album full of good material but found out using splice in your music and trying to sell it for sync isn't a good idea. On top of all this I was told I am not a good enough producer and I need to spend MORE money with that as well.

I'm at the point where I don't know where to invest my time or money.

Do I take a REAL college class on producing and mastering music or do I just find someone to pay? Do I make music for TV/Movies, or ADs and trailers? Do I invest in plugins for fake instruments or can I use Splice to add real elements? Is it REALLY possible to make music with sync if you can't make your music 100% on your own?

Thanks in advance guys. Totally venting rn ready to go back to listening to music instead of creating
To get to the point where your work is competitive, you need a LOT of experience, you need to have produced enough product that it's no longer "Hard" to do, and that you don't waste a bunch of time with "Hmmm....how am I gonna..." You need to KNOW.

Also, and this is just for me, I suppose there are composers out there who have gotten around this hurdle by various means...I'm not sure what they are...Stick to arranging samples maybe? I don't know...But my point is: I don't see how people do this gig that aren't Pro-Level musicians.

I started my career as a lead singer, I was signed to majors twice (Talk about "dating" myself) my gig was swagger, 'tude and songwriting.

After multiple "drops" (Look it up kids) and no limos on the horizon I found myself with a skill set that wasn't exactly "In demand" (Aside from the songwriting, which would be the most important skill I carried forward) and bills to pay...What's a "has been" to do?

Invest in yourself, tools come and go, your ears and your skills belong to you.

I knew how to "Play" and "Sing" but would I have hired myself for a session? Not unless it was for 1st wave punk/Glitter Rock/ New wave vocals...and those sessions don't come along as much as you might think.

Back to the woodshed, I went. I identified the important skills: STUDIO QUALITY (If you're "Punk Rock" you're doing it wrong...Yes, that hurts, so make sure you REALLY WANT TO DO IT) Guitar/Bass/Piano/Keyboard/vocal/orchestral composition/ANY style of composition/Arranging/Songwriting/Top-Lining.

Many of these skills I was able to hone on my own, some I wasn't, I got a degree in composition just to be sure...not "Audio Engineering" not "Prodoocing"

COMPO-F%$KING-SITION!!

Yeah, I can read music, yeah, I can compose an orchestral piece AND put it on paper........Did it get me laid? NO! Did it get me paid? YES!

Now here this Jr.....The skills required are this: You need to be able to write, arrange, play/program (But don't program it if you can play it...until you've done it so many
times you can do the whole thing while watching the NHL playoffs, then...whatever) then last and most assuredly LEAST.....Record/Mix/Master FINISHED PRODUCT...By yourself...FAST.

Here's the deal with "Audio engineering/Mixing/Producing schools"

Those skills come as a result of being a good musician and writer.

Someone who can write and play doesn't need to be told how to "Prodoooce" "Mix" or any of those other things.

A good composition, that is well performed...WILL SOUND GOOD! A Good arrangement...is practically ALREADY MIXED!

Any of the ins/outs particular to recording can be learned from a five minute Google search. But chances are you won't even need to do that.

That is how YOU prepare for a career in this, you become a sonic ASSASIN a stone-cold killer ready to destroy any upstart who dares put himself on your level in a bare-knuckled pit fight to the death...YOU will take on all comers and feed them their liver...YOU will "re-mix " the face of all who dare take a stand against your reign of terror...

...You lie awake nights knowing the unspeakable things you would do if you ever got a chance to go one-on-one with Hanns Zimmer...

....YOU are CLUBBER F^%KING LANG...You walk up to Zimmer and say "Hey! Zimmer! Ima show your woman what a REAL composer be like...you scared...YOU SCARED! YOU ARE DRAGO...Your cues killed Apollo Creed you ANIMAL!

...or are you?... If not...you've got work to do (eye of the tiger, EYE OF THE F%$KING TIGER)

If you aren't up for the challenge, then yes, you should do something else, and be realistic about what it takes.

I'm off to my Judo club now...I do OK...But at NO POINT TONIGHT will I be wondering why I am not getting a shot in the UFC...because I haven't put in the work...as it is, if I DID find my self walking into a UFC cage, I would soon be leaving it on a stretcher, And I'm OK with that.

You can do whatever you want in this life...as long as you are willing F^%KING DO IT.

P.S In addition to "F&^KING DOING IT" Let me also recommend that should you find yourself enjoying the fruit of such labors, STAY HUMBLE, and maintain an attitude of "I'm here to HELP PEOPLE" Not to make money, but to help people...should you fail in either quality, you'll discover before long just how big a mistake it was...

...And don't forget to have FUN!
Old 16th July 2019
  #12
I don't believe you have to be able to read music or record real instruments to make money from music. I can do both by the way. You do need a lot of skills and experience though, in this I agree with the other posters here.

It's perfectly ok to just use synths, presets and samples with a vocal being the only live instrument. Many people have made millions with that kind of setup. BUT: even if they can't play, they know their genre inside out and have great taste in music. If you're doing electronic music, do go out to clubs or DJ yourself? Do you know and own the latest and best synths, software or hardware? Can you mix to a professional or near-professional standard? Contrary to what one of the posters said, even good songs do not mix themselves and it takes lots of skill and an investment of at least $5000 to be able to play the game.

I wouldn't go down the orchestral route and spend a fortune on sample libraries if you have to programme everything in with a mouse. You'll be up against tens of thousands of people with a degree in composition and orchestrations skills honed in years of writing scores. I would recommend learning basic piano and music theory though as your music-making will be more intuitive and in all likelihood sound better for it.

But even if you go down the electronic/programming route you will still need to go all out for it and cut down on all other hobbies and social niceties like watching the game with your buddies. Sacrifice is the name of the game here, and most of us who make money from music have been making sacrifices for a very long time.

Not for everyone, but the rewards are huge, if not in monetary terms, but in life satisfaction, even if you take into account the many mind-numbing hours professionals have to spend on programming, editing, fine-tuning, rendering mixes etc. Tough choice which I made at 17, without knowing the first thing about what to expect. Probably for the better...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncovered Pitch View Post
I don't believe you have to be able to read music or record real instruments to make money from music. I can do both by the way. You do need a lot of skills and experience though, in this I agree with the other posters here.

It's perfectly ok to just use synths, presets and samples with a vocal being the only live instrument. Many people have made millions with that kind of setup. BUT: even if they can't play, they know their genre inside out and have great taste in music. If you're doing electronic music, do go out to clubs or DJ yourself? Do you know and own the latest and best synths, software or hardware? Can you mix to a professional or near-professional standard? Contrary to what one of the posters said, even good songs do not mix themselves and it takes lots of skill and an investment of at least $5000 to be able to play the game.

I wouldn't go down the orchestral route and spend a fortune on sample libraries if you have to programme everything in with a mouse. You'll be up against tens of thousands of people with a degree in composition and orchestrations skills honed in years of writing scores. I would recommend learning basic piano and music theory though as your music-making will be more intuitive and in all likelihood sound better for it.

But even if you go down the electronic/programming route you will still need to go all out for it and cut down on all other hobbies and social niceties like watching the game with your buddies. Sacrifice is the name of the game here, and most of us who make money from music have been making sacrifices for a very long time.

Not for everyone, but the rewards are huge, if not in monetary terms, but in life satisfaction, even if you take into account the many mind-numbing hours professionals have to spend on programming, editing, fine-tuning, rendering mixes etc. Tough choice which I made at 17, without knowing the first thing about what to expect. Probably for the better...
The synth VST seem to be the most costly expense? I would love to try East West monthly plan and create orchestra music as it is one of my favorite types of music, though you are correct I'd be behind in regards to an orchestra with real instruments. Thanks for your message and time man, will look into music theory classes
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by terrible.dee View Post
To get to the point where your work is competitive, you need a LOT of experience, you need to have produced enough product that it's no longer "Hard" to do, and that you don't waste a bunch of time with "Hmmm....how am I gonna..." You need to KNOW.

Also, and this is just for me, I suppose there are composers out there who have gotten around this hurdle by various means...I'm not sure what they are...Stick to arranging samples maybe? I don't know...But my point is: I don't see how people do this gig that aren't Pro-Level musicians.

I started my career as a lead singer, I was signed to majors twice (Talk about "dating" myself) my gig was swagger, 'tude and songwriting.

After multiple "drops" (Look it up kids) and no limos on the horizon I found myself with a skill set that wasn't exactly "In demand" (Aside from the songwriting, which would be the most important skill I carried forward) and bills to pay...What's a "has been" to do?

Invest in yourself, tools come and go, your ears and your skills belong to you.

I knew how to "Play" and "Sing" but would I have hired myself for a session? Not unless it was for 1st wave punk/Glitter Rock/ New wave vocals...and those sessions don't come along as much as you might think.

Back to the woodshed, I went. I identified the important skills: STUDIO QUALITY (If you're "Punk Rock" you're doing it wrong...Yes, that hurts, so make sure you REALLY WANT TO DO IT) Guitar/Bass/Piano/Keyboard/vocal/orchestral composition/ANY style of composition/Arranging/Songwriting/Top-Lining.

Many of these skills I was able to hone on my own, some I wasn't, I got a degree in composition just to be sure...not "Audio Engineering" not "Prodoocing"

COMPO-F%$KING-SITION!!

Yeah, I can read music, yeah, I can compose an orchestral piece AND put it on paper........Did it get me laid? NO! Did it get me paid? YES!

Now here this Jr.....The skills required are this: You need to be able to write, arrange, play/program (But don't program it if you can play it...until you've done it so many
times you can do the whole thing while watching the NHL playoffs, then...whatever) then last and most assuredly LEAST.....Record/Mix/Master FINISHED PRODUCT...By yourself...FAST.

Here's the deal with "Audio engineering/Mixing/Producing schools"

Those skills come as a result of being a good musician and writer.

Someone who can write and play doesn't need to be told how to "Prodoooce" "Mix" or any of those other things.

A good composition, that is well performed...WILL SOUND GOOD! A Good arrangement...is practically ALREADY MIXED!

Any of the ins/outs particular to recording can be learned from a five minute Google search. But chances are you won't even need to do that.

That is how YOU prepare for a career in this, you become a sonic ASSASIN a stone-cold killer ready to destroy any upstart who dares put himself on your level in a bare-knuckled pit fight to the death...YOU will take on all comers and feed them their liver...YOU will "re-mix " the face of all who dare take a stand against your reign of terror...

...You lie awake nights knowing the unspeakable things you would do if you ever got a chance to go one-on-one with Hanns Zimmer...

....YOU are CLUBBER F^%KING LANG...You walk up to Zimmer and say "Hey! Zimmer! Ima show your woman what a REAL composer be like...you scared...YOU SCARED! YOU ARE DRAGO...Your cues killed Apollo Creed you ANIMAL!

...or are you?... If not...you've got work to do (eye of the tiger, EYE OF THE F%$KING TIGER)

If you aren't up for the challenge, then yes, you should do something else, and be realistic about what it takes.

I'm off to my Judo club now...I do OK...But at NO POINT TONIGHT will I be wondering why I am not getting a shot in the UFC...because I haven't put in the work...as it is, if I DID find my self walking into a UFC cage, I would soon be leaving it on a stretcher, And I'm OK with that.

You can do whatever you want in this life...as long as you are willing F^%KING DO IT.

P.S In addition to "F&^KING DOING IT" Let me also recommend that should you find yourself enjoying the fruit of such labors, STAY HUMBLE, and maintain an attitude of "I'm here to HELP PEOPLE" Not to make money, but to help people...should you fail in either quality, you'll discover before long just how big a mistake it was...

...And don't forget to have FUN!
Thank you! I will look into music classes for sure. I feel average in many areas but writing and producing I feel I could excel. Started producing at 17 and now im 23 and want to get serious and make some $.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #15
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
Just a side comment. When you get to 80-90%, every 2% "better" comes with exponential cost, and exponential time commitment. The last steps are the hardest.

Good luck in your decisions. Music is a lifelong journey. I've got a university bachelors degree in composition and been doing it many decades, and still feel like there are more things I don't know than I know.

Either get on it, or find an easier way to make $$$. (note : virtually any other path is easier than making a living in music.)
I am strangely motivated to do music full time while at the same time ready to become a plumber. A music degree seems to be necessary..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #16
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desire Inspires View Post
Right, right.

Let us hear your music.
Sure thing man:

https://soundcloud.com/bennyboyblue/backs/s-lK6H4

Would love any mixing/producing advice!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #17
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
Sure thing man:

https://soundcloud.com/bennyboyblue/backs/s-lK6H4

Would love any mixing/producing advice!
Is that you singing? I dig this man! @ JohnFulford around here is into buying songs... never know!

The mix needs a little work I think, but it's certainly in the ball park. For me it's a little sizzly in the highs... and hitting that limiter pretty friggin hard. But my main advice is don't take mixing advice from me lol.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #18
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by orbiterred View Post
Is that you singing? I dig this man! @ JohnFulford around here is into buying songs... never know!

The mix needs a little work I think, but it's certainly in the ball park. For me it's a little sizzly in the highs... and hitting that limiter pretty friggin hard. But my main advice is don't take mixing advice from me lol.
That's me singing! I agree man, I used a website to master the finished produced file and it really pushed every sound a little too far/degraded the quality to a lousy mp3
Old 4 weeks ago
  #19
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
That's me singing! I agree man, I used a website to master the finished produced file and it really pushed every sound a little too far/degraded the quality to a lousy mp3
I really liked it man, not what I was expecting and you've definitely got chops. It's not a style I typically listen to but it's got it's own thing and didn't sound "cookie cutter" to me.

Keep making music like that, refine your processes, work on your mix skills and pay someone to master it if you have to (i'd ditch the online mastering crap). I'm actually enjoying the whole ozone 8 suite for mastering my own stuff these days, using the track assistant and a reference track as a starting point and then tweaking from there.

Shop it around, try and make a couple new contacts every day... It's a marathon not a sprint!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #20
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by orbiterred View Post
I really liked it man, not what I was expecting and you've definitely got chops. It's not a style I typically listen to but it's got it's own thing and didn't sound "cookie cutter" to me.

Keep making music like that, refine your processes, work on your mix skills and pay someone to master it if you have to (i'd ditch the online mastering crap). I'm actually enjoying the whole ozone 8 suite for mastering my own stuff these days, using the track assistant and a reference track as a starting point and then tweaking from there.

Shop it around, try and make a couple new contacts every day... It's a marathon not a sprint!
I will take your advice, thank you! Appreciate it. Would you say it's easier to master than to mix and produce?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #21
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
I am strangely motivated to do music full time while at the same time ready to become a plumber. A music degree seems to be necessary..
A music degree is not necessary. It might be helpful, it might not. Not a single person asked me whether or not I had a degree for over 20 years, then only once. Honestly, I think the programs might be better now, but it's not necessary. I would have learned much more by studying on my own and playing in a top-40 style band than I did at university.

As for the plumber thing...you're probably joking, but you'll make MUCH more as a plumber than you will as a musician / composer over your lifetime. If money matters - it's a clear choice.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #22
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
Would you say it's easier to master than to mix and produce?
My personal thoughts are that it's harder to be a great mastering engineer. But maybe that's coming from a mix engineering perspective.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #23
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
A music degree is not necessary. It might be helpful, it might not. Not a single person asked me whether or not I had a degree for over 20 years, then only once. Honestly, I think the programs might be better now, but it's not necessary. I would have learned much more by studying on my own and playing in a top-40 style band than I did at university.

As for the plumber thing...you're probably joking, but you'll make MUCH more as a plumber than you will as a musician / composer over your lifetime. If money matters - it's a clear choice.
Was totally joking about being a plumber, all I can use is a plunger. I think as far as school goes I may take a mastering class or something
Old 4 weeks ago
  #24
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
My personal thoughts are that it's harder to be a great mastering engineer. But maybe that's coming from a mix engineering perspective.
I'm not sure but, if I hire a master engineer I'm curious if he gets royalties, and what a usual price is for their work
Old 4 weeks ago
  #25
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
Mastering seems to be important to you. It don't think it should be. It's about the music not the mastering. Mastering can't improve a crappy track. Just makes it louder. If I listen to Let It Be at low volume, it's still a great track.

Mastering is like that little dusting of icing sugar on top of a delicious cheese cake. If your cheesecake is terrible, the gastronomic experience is gonna be lacking somewhat.
True. Maybe I need to focus on MIXING more
Old 4 weeks ago
  #26
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
In the UK a plumber is a well paid occupation - 35-50k which is very reasonable considering the average national wage is 27k. Starting out in the business now there is perhaps not that much chance of earning as much as a plumber as the boat has been missed by a decade or two.

If I were starting out now I would certainly have a back up trade/career.

Do it as a hobby and build it up whilst earning a wage and paying the mortgage/bills is my advice. Otherwise you are putting too much pressure on yourself.

IMO...
Working a desk job 9-5 for now but very miserable ha. That would be way too much pressure for sure. Just got a quote for $200 for mastering of one song which makes me wanna go to school for mastering even more
Old 4 weeks ago
  #27
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
OK. I give up.

All the best dude.

Good luck with the mastering.

Bye.
Thanks for your insight. A poor guy like me gotta take money into account as much as Id love to focus on just making good tunes. Pce bro
Old 4 weeks ago
  #28
Gear Guru
 
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***

Last edited by drBill; 4 weeks ago at 07:09 PM.. Reason: Never mind.....
Old 4 weeks ago
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicisfun View Post
The synth VST seem to be the most costly expense? I would love to try East West monthly plan and create orchestra music as it is one of my favorite types of music, though you are correct I'd be behind in regards to an orchestra with real instruments. Thanks for your message and time man, will look into music theory classes
Yes they aren't cheap, especially something like Omnisphere. But you don't need to buy them all, just one or two out of VPS Avenger, Serum, Massive X, Rapid Parawave and all the others.

Monthly Composer Cloud is great but you'll need to bounce all the tracks down if you ever need to cancel your subscription. The sounds are superb it's just knowing what to do with them if you're not classically trained. Not impossible, but harder.

I liked your track by the way—yes the mastering was too heavy-handed but the musicality was good and your voice didn't sound half-bad either. In this genre everything needs to be super-polished though before it even gets to mastering so gear and experience count here as well.

Again I'm disagreeing with other posters here but I think it's better to go all-out now, say for three years and then think about a fallback. Risky, yes, but you're quite a long way behind as it is so if you try and catch up while building a "normal" career you may well be too old to make your mark in music by the time you've got that career established. Evenings and weekend pace just won't cut it because your competition doesn't work that way. The people who make the money you're after are nearly all fanatics who are less concerned with things like security, material comforts, a full stomach etc.

And yes you can learn how to mix, master, write lyrics, compose at school—both online and offline—and you should, especially as a late starter. But too many people make the mistake thinking that a degree will guarantee them a career in music—it won't and you still have to work "in the trenches", meaning writing and producing song after song, day after day, weekend after weekend.

Opinions, opinions...
Old 4 weeks ago
  #30
Here for the gear
 
MattDawg5's Avatar
 

I agree with everyone saying "focus on the songs/music first". I had this big idea/dream that I was going to record everything, mix, master, and release and instrumental EP. The more I got into the process, the more I realized how much time I was putting into the production side of it instead of polishing up the songs to be their very best. Fast forward to today: I switched gears and booked time at a real studio this summer (still in the process of recording). Hired a session drummer, cellist, keys, and trumpet player, so I can just focus on guitars/bass. I'm letting a trained/experienced engineer handle the controls and will also do the same with mastering. Once it is completed, it may never make a penny for me, but at least I know I put in my best effort to create something. I also work a day job and would love to do music full time, but I know how hard that is. So for now, I'll just keep saving up and writing.
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