The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Soundproofing/isolating a small room/closet
Old 16th April 2019
  #31
there are two issues with all acoustic spaces and the materials used to combat one issue do not help the other issue and vice versa....

With guitar iso spaces... or with drums, or whatever else... the two issues are...

1) Acoustic Isolation (stop sound from getting out and stop outside sound from getting in)
2) Acoustic frequency response of the recording environment (how good it sounds inside)

In order to isolate sounds, you need mass, decouple the spaces from one another, and an air tight seal. That's it. It's that simple. the denser a material it is, the better it will be at stopping sound from going through it. BUT!!! the more dense a material is, the more it will reflect sound back into the recording environment making the recording environment sound worse.

The size of the recording environment also effects the sound. The smaller the space, the worse it sounds. Period. That is the physics of it. You can't overcome that. If anyone is interested I can expand on this... but in order not to bore you to death... just remember the smaller the space, the worse it is going to sound.

We use things like MDF plywood and Quietrock because they are DENSE. Plywood isn't as good as MDF for stopping sound. Concrete is also good. Metal is good too (that is why there is a thin sheet of metal running through the middle of Quietrock).

You can use things like insulation to try and add density to open air spaces, and that can help. But it isn't a substitute for pure mass and decoupling the spaces.

As for using Roxul or OC703... fiberglass insulation absorbs sound. It is a "frictional" absorber. The premise is that insulation acts like molasses to sound waves and slows them down, taking a lot of the energy out of them. It can stop sound from passing through it to a certain extent based on the thickness. It works really well at helping to stop sounds from reflecting off walls. It works much better than acoustic foam like auralex.

anyway... the smaller the room, the thicker the fiberglass needs to be in order to absorb the problems and make the space inside sound good. This is ultimately the problem with any guitar iso box... the box is so small that it needs insulation so thick to make it sound good that there is no room to put an amp. This is why all the guitar iso boxes, even with some acoustic treatment inside them, still sound very boxy and nasal.

Again, I can get into the specifics and the science behind this if anyone is interested, but just as a general guideline guitar iso boxes are never going to really be dense enough nor will the acoustic treatment inside be thick enough to work well for recording loud guitars.
Old 16th April 2019
  #32
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike P View Post
Yeah, that's a bit different than mounting a 12" speaker in an MDF cabinet and expecting it to sound like a heavy duty plywood Marshall-style speaker cabinet, because the cabinet itself is crucial to the sound of the speaker and amp.

Building a box made of MDF to surround a combo amp or cabinet might be a better solution, although I had a friend try that with a large road case and the boxy sound was clearly evident.

What it really comes down to is that at this point in time, an elegant solution to significantly reducing the overall volume while also capturing the essence of a guitar, amp and speaker, without making compromises, doesn't exist.

If someone can crack that nut, they might be able to make a few bucks on the side.
Ah, I didn't realize we were talking about actually mounting a speaker to the isobox. Yeah, no way you'd use MDF for that. Purely talking about isolating an existing speaker cab. I was thinking along the lines of the Vocal Booth product that was linked. I saw the box in person at NAB last week- it worked quite well, I must admit.
Old 16th April 2019
  #33
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
there are two issues with all acoustic spaces and the materials used to combat one issue do not help the other issue and vice versa....

With guitar iso spaces... or with drums, or whatever else... the two issues are...

1) Acoustic Isolation (stop sound from getting out and stop outside sound from getting in)
2) Acoustic frequency response of the recording environment (how good it sounds inside)

In order to isolate sounds, you need mass, decouple the spaces from one another, and an air tight seal. That's it. It's that simple. the denser a material it is, the better it will be at stopping sound from going through it. BUT!!! the more dense a material is, the more it will reflect sound back into the recording environment making the recording environment sound worse.

The size of the recording environment also effects the sound. The smaller the space, the worse it sounds. Period. That is the physics of it. You can't overcome that. If anyone is interested I can expand on this... but in order not to bore you to death... just remember the smaller the space, the worse it is going to sound.

We use things like MDF plywood and Quietrock because they are DENSE. Plywood isn't as good as MDF for stopping sound. Concrete is also good. Metal is good too (that is why there is a thin sheet of metal running through the middle of Quietrock).

You can use things like insulation to try and add density to open air spaces, and that can help. But it isn't a substitute for pure mass and decoupling the spaces.

As for using Roxul or OC703... fiberglass insulation absorbs sound. It is a "frictional" absorber. The premise is that insulation acts like molasses to sound waves and slows them down, taking a lot of the energy out of them. It can stop sound from passing through it to a certain extent based on the thickness. It works really well at helping to stop sounds from reflecting off walls. It works much better than acoustic foam like auralex.

anyway... the smaller the room, the thicker the fiberglass needs to be in order to absorb the problems and make the space inside sound good. This is ultimately the problem with any guitar iso box... the box is so small that it needs insulation so thick to make it sound good that there is no room to put an amp. This is why all the guitar iso boxes, even with some acoustic treatment inside them, still sound very boxy and nasal.

Again, I can get into the specifics and the science behind this if anyone is interested, but just as a general guideline guitar iso boxes are never going to really be dense enough nor will the acoustic treatment inside be thick enough to work well for recording loud guitars.
3" Roxul works surprisingly well at close range. By far my favorite absorber material. Total sound vacuum. Haven't tried it in a little box, but my guess is it would do pretty well at stopping reflections. There are also mass loaded vinyl panels that work extremely well for stopping sound... but are super pricey.

Just buy a Kemper and be done with it!
Old 17th April 2019
  #34
Quote:
Originally Posted by VitaEtMusica View Post
3" Roxul works surprisingly well at close range. By far my favorite absorber material. Total sound vacuum. Haven't tried it in a little box, but my guess is it would do pretty well at stopping reflections. There are also mass loaded vinyl panels that work extremely well for stopping sound... but are super pricey.

Just buy a Kemper and be done with it!
Yes and no. Any frictional absorber can only work when it is placed within the most kinetic part of the wavelength.

free-standing 3" rockboard60 can do a pretty good job down to 125Hz (absorbing 78% of sound that hits it at 125Hz). BUT!!! when you stick any frictional absorber onto a boundary like a wall or a ceiling, it severely diminishes it's ability to absorb sound.

Why?

Because frictional absorbers need air MOVEMENT to work, they do nothing to stop air pressure. So... when putting a 3" thick frictional absorber on a wall... it's absorption characteristics will start to taper off at around 1.1KHz and won't be absorbing/stopping anything down at 500Hz, 250Hz, 125Hz and below.

It has nothing to do with the functional ability of the fiberglass materials but just the nature of physics. As sound approaches a boundary, it switches from kinetic to potential energy... basically it switches from air movement to air pressure. That point where it switches is frequency dependent and is based on the 1/4 wavelength (the 90º or 270º point of the waveform) of the frequency. a frequency of 1130 Hz has a wavelength of 12 inches, that means 1130Hz takes 12 inches to do one cycle or one full sinusoidal push/pull. The quarter wavelength (the 90º point of the waveform) of 1130Hz is therefore 3 inches (12inches / 4). So at 3 inches from the wall 1130Hz starts changing from air movement to air pressure as you approach the half wavelength (180º point of the waveform) or full wavelength (0º/360º point of the waveform) up against the wall.

This is why membrane absorbers exist. Membrane absorbers work by absorbing pressure but do nothing for physical movement. They are in a way, the opposite of a frictional absorber. But membrane absorbers, while absorbing a significant amount of low frequency energy while attached against a room boundary, totally reflect mid and high frequency sound. Which is why it would be an acoustic nightmare to put them inside a small guitar iso box or a small iso booth.

And because of boundary pressure, you would need several feet thickness rockboard60 to absorb all the standing waves created between 60Hz and 300Hz by a small box enclosure, thus negating the usefulness of the box itself. To effectively absorb 60Hz to the spec of the material, you would need a rockboard60 panel that is almost 5 feet thick! to effectively absorb 150Hz you would need a panel almost 2 feet thick... and that is just to get to the specs of the panel! So for example, at 125 Hz, you would need almost 2 and 1/2 feet thickness Rockboard60 to get to the panel's 78% max absorption at that frequency. (when attached to a room boundary).

This is why frictional absorbers, when used as bass traps, are meant to be hung across the corners of the room. By doing so you are making the absorber deeper because it is sitting farther away from the boundary. If from the front of the 3" thick panel to the corner behind it is 2 and 1/2 feet in distance, now that panel across the corner will absorb down to around 125Hz before it starts rolling off... where the same panel when put flush to the wall will only absorb down to 1.1KHz before it starts rolling off.

Last edited by Etch-A-Sketch; 17th April 2019 at 05:06 PM..
Old 18th April 2019
  #35
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by VitaEtMusica View Post
The MDF is about getting a really dense material that's easy to work with and durable, for cheap. The MDF is what is going to do the most good at actually stopping noise transmission, but a loud speaker will still bleed through an airtight 1 inch MDF box. 1" is absolutely better than 1/2". More mass, more stoppage.
So are you saying that sound will pass though the sheet of MDF because its not 100% air tight?
Old 18th April 2019
  #36
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by VitaEtMusica View Post
A refrigerated warehouse would be the ultimate isobooth, besides being freezing cold
This idea I looked at making myself but never worked!
walkin fridge/ frezer panels are sold by the squere meter and are easy to fit together but are not cheep! Finding an old scrap fridge frezer is easy, but one big enough to stand up in was not, they all seamed to want silly money for there scrap large fridges
Old 18th April 2019
  #37
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunch and bell View Post
This idea I looked at making myself but never worked!
walkin fridge/ frezer panels are sold by the squere meter and are easy to fit together but are not cheep! Finding an old scrap fridge frezer is easy, but one big enough to stand up in was not, they all seamed to want silly money for there scrap large fridges
Don't suffocate yourself, dude!
Old 18th April 2019
  #38
Lives for gear
 
VitaEtMusica's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunch and bell View Post
So are you saying that sound will pass though the sheet of MDF because its not 100% air tight?
Where the mdf has joints won't be, but it's just not enough mass to completely stop sound.
Old 21st April 2019
  #39
Gear Head
 

What about plastic sheeting then?
Old 9th June 2019
  #40
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by orbiterred View Post


On a more serious note, any tips for using IR's? What loader are you using?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
The wall of sound from torpedo
I decided to make a major change to my guitar recording process this week, switching from the Randall MTS system of modular amplifiers to Bruce Egnater's new company, Synergy, which features modules specifically built and designed by Mike Soldano, Reinhold Bogner, Dave Friedman and many other fantastic amp builders. I loved the first module that I purchased (an Engl) so much that I became an artist endorser last week.

Long story short, I'll be using the Synergy Syn-2 dual rackmount preamp, which pairs with the new modules to add a Sag control along with a Cathode Bias so that each module "feels" how the designer intended his amp(s) to feel. That option isn't available on the Randall MTS heads, so I had to make the jump.

This also meant my first foray into IR's and there is a LOT of information, disinformation and companies to choose from, which took hours of research and experimentation. I had purchased the Kazrog ReCabinet at some point like 10 years ago and never used it, so I logged in, downloaded the latest version and tried their IR's. With all due respect, I didn't care for them at all and I began to dismiss the whole idea, so I can see how people could easily throw in the towel because there is no way I could deal with the guitar tones I was getting.

The next step was to purchase and download IR's from Celestion. I did a Mix & Match, in which I chose 5 different speakers recorded with various microphones on a Neve console in the UK. I was really impressed with the IR's, as they not only give you multiple options and mic combo's, they're extremely well recorded and sound "pre-mixed" in a way. They're very balanced so there's not too much bass, treble or midrange in any of their offerings. I grabbed five more, then five more, for a total of 15 different speakers in speaker cabinets to start. Recabinet has High and Low Pass filters, along with two parametric EQ's and the option to use two cabinets simultaneously, so it's a pretty powerful tool, albeit very "DOS" looking. Suffice to say, the GUI isn't going to sway new customers but it's extremely easy to use.

After dialing in 12 mic and speaker combinations (I often choose a 4x12 cab mic'd with a Royer 121 and a 1x12 with a 57) using various amps (Fender, Marshall, Engl, Soldano) and various guitars (Charvel, Les Paul's, Strats, Jaguar, etc.), I became very excited with the results. Specific amps paired with specific speaker combinations sounded fantastic - it's definitely not a "One Size Fits All" type of situation. But my process was to work for hours dialing in specific sounds and compare those sounds to previously recorded tracks I'd done using the same amp and guitar combo. In many cases, I could replicate the sound dead on. In others, the sound wasn't exact but in all honesty, the IR's were better suited and produced a more "authentic" tone, for lack of a better word, than my closed back Bogner Cube. The most glaring instance was using a 2x12 Open Back cab loaded with Celestion Gold speakers and a Fender Deluxe amp head: It just blew the Bogner Cube loaded with a Celestion Lynchback out of the water in terms of an "authentic" and genuine tone. For a guy like me that works from home in a very nice space (15x19x9) but lacks the ability to mic up half a dozen or more guitar cabinets, this opens up a world of opportunities.

So after spending 4 full days working with ReCabinet and the Celestion IR's, I downloaded and auditioned the Two Notes Torpedo Wall of Sound. Right off the bat, the WoS is impressive looking (if not a bit intimidating in Arcade Mode) and even though I have a pair 27" LCD's, I just couldn't read the GUI. It took some time to find how to increase the size but once I found it, it was extremely easy to read and navigate. There's some weirdness with the Arcade version vs. the normal GUI and while I wouldn't advise people to avoid Arcade mode, I wouldn't advise spending much time because the sound definitely changes between the two modes. Plus, the normal mode is MUCH easier to navigate and read.

WoS comes with one Vintage Marshall cabinet IR but as long as you're connected to the internet, you're able to audition every cabinet they offer (Ownhammer, Celestion and other companies also make IR's specifically for Two Notes, which are in a different format than the standard .Wav format for most of the Celestions and other IR's out there). I started out using their 4x12 cabinet with a Royer R121, with the mic centered and 100% close to the speaker. It sounded huge and bassy, almost like sitting in front of a 4x12. For playing around purposes, it was really cool because it was so huge. But after dropping it into a mix, it disappeared. The next step was to add a 57 to the cabinet and begin trying different mic combinations and positions. Again, it sounded cool to jam with but I just couldn't get it to sit in a mix. I began experiementing with their EQ, which is ridiculously powerful in terms of EQ range (1db plus or minus sounded to me more like 3db) and while they offer 4 bands, they just seemed to me like they were in the "wrong" place, at least for my taste. So I quickly turned off the EQ and began auditioning 4x12 cabinets.

WoS has many microphone options, although all options aren't available for every cabinet. Some cabs offer a R121 and others don't but offer a 122 or an R92 (which is a GREAT ribbon mic for guitar, BTW). But everytime I dialed something in, I'd drop it in a mix and it was all wrong. Once again, awesome as a standalone, completely off for a mix (or at least my mixes). I then decided to drop in a Celestion Blue 1x12 cab matched with a Two Notes 4x12 cab. I spent hours auditioning those combos but ultimately, the sound of the Celestion IR's and ReCabinet were much, much better than those with the WoS 4x12's and Celestion IR's. At that point, I went back to the Celestion site (celestionplus.com) and downloaded the Two Notes Format but the Celestion's won't allow users to change the microphone positioning - it's a fixed position (they offer a few packs that were recorded in the proper TNT format but those require a separate purchase).

Next, I tried using the Celestion IR's in WoS, so I loaded up a 4x12 w/Vintage 30's mic'd with an R121 and the aforementioned 1x12 Blue speaker with a 57. Much to my surprise, the IR's sounded completely different than when used with ReCabinet and not in what I'd call a "good" way. It sounded really "processed", for lack of a better word - muddy and unclear. There must be some kind of additonal processing that's necessary in the WoS format because it was completely unusable. It sounded like there was a blanket over the cabinet, which was mic'd from like 15 feet away. Just really strange and processed.

I spent another 5-6 hours auditioning WoS while saving speaker cabinet combo's for an instant comparison (although I should add that the 30 day trial version of Wall of Sound has intermittent dropouts. I'm all good with preventing piracy but IMO, the dropouts were way too frequent, which made it difficult to really sit back and get a feel for how it sounded). Each speaker cabinet with multiple mic positions is only $8 dollars US currency, so it's certainly not exhorbitant, but the amount of time it took to audition each and every cabinet, along with multiple mics and mic positions, was time consuming and began to wear on me for a bit, so I shut down and came back fresh the next day.

I had convinced myself later that evening to purchase five WoS cabinets because they offer a 25% discount for 5 or more since $30 dollars is a drop in the bucket. But when reviewing my choices the next day, it was clearly evident that ReCabinet & the Celestion IR's sounded way more "natural" and balanced as compared to the WoS cabinets and mics, so I would essentially be spending money to spend money. It wasn't a subtle difference to my ears - it was night and day, making it a very easy choice to uninstall WoS and move forward with ReCabinet and the Celestion IR's.

With so many speakers, mics and cabinet configurations available, I can easily see how someone would give up after an hour or so because it really is a painstaking process (or at least it was for me). But now that I'm familiar with all of the Celestion speakers and mic options, changing the sound or auditioning another speaker is just a mouse click away. ReCabinet might be the least "sexy" app I've ever seen but for me, it works astonishingly well.

I hope this helps!
Old 9th June 2019
  #41
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike P View Post
I decided to make a major change to my guitar recording process this week, switching from the Randall MTS system of modular amplifiers to Bruce Egnater's new company, Synergy, which features modules specifically built and designed by Mike Soldano, Reinhold Bogner, Dave Friedman and many other fantastic amp builders. I loved the first module that I purchased (an Engl) so much that I became an artist endorser last week.

Long story short, I'll be using the Synergy Syn-2 dual rackmount preamp, which pairs with the new modules to add a Sag control along with a Cathode Bias so that each module "feels" how the designer intended his amp(s) to feel. That option isn't available on the Randall MTS heads, so I had to make the jump.

This also meant my first foray into IR's and there is a LOT of information, disinformation and companies to choose from, which took hours of research and experimentation. I had purchased the Kazrog ReCabinet at some point like 10 years ago and never used it, so I logged in, downloaded the latest version and tried their IR's. With all due respect, I didn't care for them at all and I began to dismiss the whole idea, so I can see how people could easily throw in the towel because there is no way I could deal with the guitar tones I was getting.

The next step was to purchase and download IR's from Celestion. I did a Mix & Match, in which I chose 5 different speakers recorded with various microphones on a Neve console in the UK. I was really impressed with the IR's, as they not only give you multiple options and mic combo's, they're extremely well recorded and sound "pre-mixed" in a way. They're very balanced so there's not too much bass, treble or midrange in any of their offerings. I grabbed five more, then five more, for a total of 15 different speakers in speaker cabinets to start. Recabinet has High and Low Pass filters, along with two parametric EQ's and the option to use two cabinets simultaneously, so it's a pretty powerful tool, albeit very "DOS" looking. Suffice to say, the GUI isn't going to sway new customers but it's extremely easy to use.

After dialing in 12 mic and speaker combinations (I often choose a 4x12 cab mic'd with a Royer 121 and a 1x12 with a 57) using various amps (Fender, Marshall, Engl, Soldano) and various guitars (Charvel, Les Paul's, Strats, Jaguar, etc.), I became very excited with the results. Specific amps paired with specific speaker combinations sounded fantastic - it's definitely not a "One Size Fits All" type of situation. But my process was to work for hours dialing in specific sounds and compare those sounds to previously recorded tracks I'd done using the same amp and guitar combo. In many cases, I could replicate the sound dead on. In others, the sound wasn't exact but in all honesty, the IR's were better suited and produced a more "authentic" tone, for lack of a better word, than my closed back Bogner Cube. The most glaring instance was using a 2x12 Open Back cab loaded with Celestion Gold speakers and a Fender Deluxe amp head: It just blew the Bogner Cube loaded with a Celestion Lynchback out of the water in terms of an "authentic" and genuine tone. For a guy like me that works from home in a very nice space (15x19x9) but lacks the ability to mic up half a dozen or more guitar cabinets, this opens up a world of opportunities.

So after spending 4 full days working with ReCabinet and the Celestion IR's, I downloaded and auditioned the Two Notes Torpedo Wall of Sound. Right off the bat, the WoS is impressive looking (if not a bit intimidating in Arcade Mode) and even though I have a pair 27" LCD's, I just couldn't read the GUI. It took some time to find how to increase the size but once I found it, it was extremely easy to read and navigate. There's some weirdness with the Arcade version vs. the normal GUI and while I wouldn't advise people to avoid Arcade mode, I wouldn't advise spending much time because the sound definitely changes between the two modes. Plus, the normal mode is MUCH easier to navigate and read.

WoS comes with one Vintage Marshall cabinet IR but as long as you're connected to the internet, you're able to audition every cabinet they offer (Ownhammer, Celestion and other companies also make IR's specifically for Two Notes, which are in a different format than the standard .Wav format for most of the Celestions and other IR's out there). I started out using their 4x12 cabinet with a Royer R121, with the mic centered and 100% close to the speaker. It sounded huge and bassy, almost like sitting in front of a 4x12. For playing around purposes, it was really cool because it was so huge. But after dropping it into a mix, it disappeared. The next step was to add a 57 to the cabinet and begin trying different mic combinations and positions. Again, it sounded cool to jam with but I just couldn't get it to sit in a mix. I began experiementing with their EQ, which is ridiculously powerful in terms of EQ range (1db plus or minus sounded to me more like 3db) and while they offer 4 bands, they just seemed to me like they were in the "wrong" place, at least for my taste. So I quickly turned off the EQ and began auditioning 4x12 cabinets.

WoS has many microphone options, although all options aren't available for every cabinet. Some cabs offer a R121 and others don't but offer a 122 or an R92 (which is a GREAT ribbon mic for guitar, BTW). But everytime I dialed something in, I'd drop it in a mix and it was all wrong. Once again, awesome as a standalone, completely off for a mix (or at least my mixes). I then decided to drop in a Celestion Blue 1x12 cab matched with a Two Notes 4x12 cab. I spent hours auditioning those combos but ultimately, the sound of the Celestion IR's and ReCabinet were much, much better than those with the WoS 4x12's and Celestion IR's. At that point, I went back to the Celestion site (celestionplus.com) and downloaded the Two Notes Format but the Celestion's won't allow users to change the microphone positioning - it's a fixed position (they offer a few packs that were recorded in the proper TNT format but those require a separate purchase).

Next, I tried using the Celestion IR's in WoS, so I loaded up a 4x12 w/Vintage 30's mic'd with an R121 and the aforementioned 1x12 Blue speaker with a 57. Much to my surprise, the IR's sounded completely different than when used with ReCabinet and not in what I'd call a "good" way. It sounded really "processed", for lack of a better word - muddy and unclear. There must be some kind of additonal processing that's necessary in the WoS format because it was completely unusable. It sounded like there was a blanket over the cabinet, which was mic'd from like 15 feet away. Just really strange and processed.

I spent another 5-6 hours auditioning WoS while saving speaker cabinet combo's for an instant comparison (although I should add that the 30 day trial version of Wall of Sound has intermittent dropouts. I'm all good with preventing piracy but IMO, the dropouts were way too frequent, which made it difficult to really sit back and get a feel for how it sounded). Each speaker cabinet with multiple mic positions is only $8 dollars US currency, so it's certainly not exhorbitant, but the amount of time it took to audition each and every cabinet, along with multiple mics and mic positions, was time consuming and began to wear on me for a bit, so I shut down and came back fresh the next day.

I had convinced myself later that evening to purchase five WoS cabinets because they offer a 25% discount for 5 or more since $30 dollars is a drop in the bucket. But when reviewing my choices the next day, it was clearly evident that ReCabinet & the Celestion IR's sounded way more "natural" and balanced as compared to the WoS cabinets and mics, so I would essentially be spending money to spend money. It wasn't a subtle difference to my ears - it was night and day, making it a very easy choice to uninstall WoS and move forward with ReCabinet and the Celestion IR's.

With so many speakers, mics and cabinet configurations available, I can easily see how someone would give up after an hour or so because it really is a painstaking process (or at least it was for me). But now that I'm familiar with all of the Celestion speakers and mic options, changing the sound or auditioning another speaker is just a mouse click away. ReCabinet might be the least "sexy" app I've ever seen but for me, it works astonishingly well.

I hope this helps!
Mike,

Thx for the detailed notes, man

I was not really feeling IRs until messing with the Celestion IRs myself... I purchased mine optimized for the Two Notes universe, but, before Celestion started creating the specific Two Notes IRs. I wonder if the WoS (which works at 48k, 200ms) is truncating the poop out of your existing Celestion IRs. You should be able to re-download them and specify Two Notes in the manufacturer’s drop down menu (see pic)... I’d be curious if your experience is different afterwards...

Brett
Attached Thumbnails
Soundproofing/isolating a small room/closet-7746bfc1-7b00-4aa5-8550-c8e5657ef089.jpg  
Old 9th June 2019
  #42
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
Mike,

Thx for the detailed notes, man

I was not really feeling IRs until messing with the Celestion IRs myself... I purchased mine optimized for the Two Notes universe, but, before Celestion started creating the specific Two Notes IRs. I wonder if the WoS (which works at 48k, 200ms) is truncating the poop out of your existing Celestion IRs. You should be able to re-download them and specify Two Notes in the manufacturer’s drop down menu (see pic)... I’d be curious if your experience is different afterwards...

Brett
Thanks, Brett! I did download the IR's in the WoS format but we users aren't able to change the mic position because their "normal" IR's aren't in the WoS proprietary format, just a .Wav format. As mentioned, the same exact IR's sounded completely different in WoS than they do in ReCabinet - again, night and day difference.

Celestion does offer five different IR packs that were specifically created for WoS but I didn't purchase those, as I found them after I'd spent days purchasing and putting together presets in ReCabinet. Since I'm stoked about those results, I found it unnecessary to spend additional time and money on that specific platform.

Here's a link to the Celestion WoS IR's in their proprietary format:

https://www.celestionplus.com/products/two-notes/
Old 9th June 2019
  #43
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike P View Post
Thanks, Brett! I did download the IR's in the WoS format but we users aren't able to change the mic position because their "normal" IR's aren't in the WoS proprietary format, just a .Wav format. As mentioned, the same exact IR's sounded completely different in WoS than they do in ReCabinet - again, night and day difference.

Celestion does offer five different IR packs that were specifically created for WoS but I didn't purchase those, as I found them after I'd spent days purchasing and putting together presets in ReCabinet. Since I'm stoked about those results, I found it unnecessary to spend additional time and money on that specific platform.

Here's a link to the Celestion WoS IR's in their proprietary format:

https://www.celestionplus.com/products/two-notes/
Gotcha... just making sure, man

I have a couple of other IR loaders... I think I’ll try them out and see if I hear a difference over WoS...

Off topic... anybody have a good 8” champ IR??
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump