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Info - Insight
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Info - Insight

Hi All

I submitted some demos to music publishers and below got the two replies. I know they are not interested right now and maybe never. I'm just looking for some insights from others to learn what companies mean with these comments.

How real are they? Do they just say things for the sake of it? I'm new to this side of music by the way.

1
Currently, we do not a have a spot for it in our catalog but we will keep your contact info and let you know if something becomes available in the future.

2
We strive to only take on artists and music that fill our immediate needs, and in an effort to never waste anyone's time and resources, we take this application process very seriously.

After exploring the material, we don't feel there is a direct fit for our catalog at this time. That said, we'll certainly keep your info on-hand and in mind should anything change down the road.

Thanks In Advance
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Head
 

I've never been contacted back by a library that said "we'll keep your info on your hand though" or "we'll let you know".

They probably receive a few million emails a day..
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohwell View Post
I've never been contacted back by a library that said "we'll keep your info on your hand though" or "we'll let you know".
Neither have I. But I did get on board with one of them after contacting them about a year later. "Remember me....?"

JK - those comments mean one of two things:

1. They feel that your music is worthy, but not a fit for their catalog at this time, and will keep your info with the intention of at some point down the line contacting you.

2. They are tactfully telling you that they feel that you are not up to the task, and that your music is not good enough to be put into their catalog.

In any event, don't be discouraged, and keep plugging away.

Cheers.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyKnights View Post
Hi All

I submitted some demos to music publishers and below got the two replies. I know they are not interested right now and maybe never. I'm just looking for some insights from others to learn what companies mean with these comments.

How real are they? Do they just say things for the sake of it? I'm new to this side of music by the way.

1
Currently, we do not a have a spot for it in our catalog but we will keep your contact info and let you know if something becomes available in the future.

2
We strive to only take on artists and music that fill our immediate needs, and in an effort to never waste anyone's time and resources, we take this application process very seriously.

After exploring the material, we don't feel there is a direct fit for our catalog at this time. That said, we'll certainly keep your info on-hand and in mind should anything change down the road.

Thanks In Advance
If you can, I would write back to them and ask if they have any brief comments or critiques?

Those responses are so generic that it makes it suspect.

But my question to you is, did you spend the time looking at their websites and catalogs to see how their music is produced? What styles they mainly do? Who their target audience(s) is/are?

A big part of the problem I see with people submitting to catalogs is they don't even spend 5 minutes to ascertain what the catalog is about before sending music...

I'll give you an example (I use this example all the time...so you may have read it here in the forums before... but for those that haven't read it yet, here it is...),

Home
Liquid Cinema. They are a catalog owned by well-known composer Jeff Rona.

JEFF RONA - HOME
Jeff Rona - IMDb

What does Jeff mainly do? Look at his website and his credits... he mainly scores TV shows...

So guess what Liquid Cinema mainly does??? It is a catalog of underscore music for... you guessed it, scoring TV shows! Now that is not the only thing they do... recently they divided Liquid Cinema up into two catalogs that you see on their site now... they have "Inside Tracks" which as it says "Unrivaled Underscore" and then they have "Liquid Cinema" which says "Premier Trailer Music".

OK... So their two main target audiences are Trailers and TV/Film underscore. What if your music is mainly suited for TV commercials or infomercials??? Do you think you should send them music for TV commercials???

Next... let's look at...

Audiomachine
Audio Machine...

Doing a few quick google searches shows that Audio Machine was founded and is owned by Paul Dinletir. Paul doesn't have a lot of Film or TV credits... but when you read about him you'll see that he is mainly known for trailers.

Then when you look at Audiomachine's website... they have two headings right at the top of the page... "Trailers" and "Advertising"...

so that should tell you that they target Trailers and Advertising/Commercials... because of that do you think it would be a good idea to send them all of your TV underscore tracks???

And so on... just spending a couple of minutes looking up who you are sending music too can help you figure out if what you are sending is relevant or not. Send what is relevant. You can send other stuff too, but you have to put it in context... something along the lines of...

"Hi Library XZY, I noticed from your site you mainly focus on Promos and Trailers.

Here is a link to music I have available that was specifically written for Promos... [Link]

Here is a link to music i have available that was specifically written for Trailers... [Link]

Also... I noticed you don't have any real sports focused music on your site, and Sports music is also a forte of mine. If you are interested or might be currently looking to expand your sports offerings in your catalog(s), here is a link to music I have available that I wrote and produced specifically for Basketball [Link], and Football [Link].

Thank you for your time and consideration. I feel my writing style and production skills could be a huge asset and money-maker for your catalog and would love to work with you... blah blah blah"



Make sense? Also try to figure out if the catalog makes it's own music or if it just represents other production companies who actually make the music. Why? Because if you send an email to the distributor, they aren't going to be able to do anything for you.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #5
Here for the gear
 

Hi all thanks for your info.

The two libaries I sent to there was a really good idea my music might fit. When I send tracks, it's kind of like a knowing who might or no way consider my music. I'm feeling my way round, as still new to this library music concept.

How long does the demo submissions take for a reply. I'm still waiting two and a half month's for some. Is that the norm or forget about it?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #6
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyKnights View Post
Hi All

I submitted some demos
OK. That's enough info to calculate a probable result. Don't submit demos. Unless you have a relationship with the client and they want to hear your progress, only submit KILLER finished work that is mind blowingly awesome and at or above current industry standards for the genre you are submitting.

For instance - if you're submitting Cinematic Film Score styles to Extreme, you'd better be at or above the level of Hans Zimmer. Cause that's who you're competing against.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyKnights View Post
Hi all thanks for your info.

The two libaries I sent to there was a really good idea my music might fit. When I send tracks, it's kind of like a knowing who might or no way consider my music. I'm feeling my way round, as still new to this library music concept.

How long does the demo submissions take for a reply. I'm still waiting two and a half month's for some. Is that the norm or forget about it?
"Feeling my way around" is not a good plan for success in an industry that is cutthroat, way overcrowded, and in many instances - desperate. You need to come out confident and swinging for a grand slam. You need to do one of two things :

1. Do not wait any longer than 2 weeks for an answer. If you are CONFIDENT in your music, recontact them, and continue to keep recontacting them until you get an answer you like.

2. Regroup and start over with stronger material and production values.


2.5 months is a no, or a we don't care, or a we got too much music answer. It's not a "non" answer.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #8
Gear Nut
 

OP - sorry buddy, sounds like they sent you the email they send everyone and they aren't interested and probably didn't even listen. I would advise you to swiftly move on. It's hard but we've all been there.

FWIW...

Emailing is not a very effective form of introduction (I'm talking top tier libraries here). You have to make direct contact. A face to face meeting is best. Make a connection with them. If they like you (and your music) they will work with you and you can build lucrative relationships that will last for decades.

Because you really have to commit to this industry for the long term. So you need to establish proper, professional relationships that can facilitate longevity.

When I say long, I mean long. As in, like, really long.

IMO
Old 3 weeks ago
  #9
Gear Maniac
 

Lornemalvo,

Just curious. So you would call a top notch Lib and ask to have a meeting or do lunch?

Not trying to be cynical. I'm just thinking that a top tier Lib could get whoever they want to write for them, by just a SC demo. Also, they probably have 100 people a day trying to contact them. From my experience, the ones that don't accept submissions, accept friends recommendations.




Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
OP - sorry buddy, sounds like they sent you the email they send everyone and they aren't interested and probably didn't even listen. I would advise you to swiftly move on. It's hard but we've all been there.

FWIW...

Emailing is not a very effective form of introduction (I'm talking top tier libraries here). You have to make direct contact. A face to face meeting is best. Make a connection with them. If they like you (and your music) they will work with you and you can build lucrative relationships that will last for decades.

Because you really have to commit to this industry for the long term. So you need to establish proper, professional relationships that can facilitate longevity.

When I say long, I mean long. As in, like, really long.

IMO
Old 3 weeks ago
  #10
Email is good, wait couple to four weeks before sending a remind, politely ask if they got your last email. I am more than happy I did, otherwise I would missed the big opportunity.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #11
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny Scott View Post
Lornemalvo,

Just curious. So you would call a top notch Lib and ask to have a meeting or do lunch?

Not trying to be cynical. I'm just thinking that a top tier Lib could get whoever they want to write for them, by just a SC demo. Also, they probably have 100 people a day trying to contact them. From my experience, the ones that don't accept submissions, accept friends recommendations.
Be cynical by all means Danny. I think that is often the best way. I've given my advice and explained why I think F2F is important in building long-term professional relationships so please feel free to take it on board or not.

Everyone has their own approach. This worked for me and hey, by some miracle I'm still here after nearly 20 years as a professional composer in an impossible industry! I guess F2F wouldn't work for everyone though. It is difficult to do but I have found that the most difficult paths lead to the bigger rewards and a more interesting life. I get a little queasy if things are too easy. That means that everyone will be doing that 'thing' too. Professionally and musically, I want to be doing what those other 12 million composers aren't doing.

If sending SC demos and emailing works for people then that's great! There really is no right or wrong answer.

I wish you all the best.

LM
Old 3 weeks ago
  #12
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
IME, personal relationships and face to face encounters with other humans really can't be beat. It's not that you can't be successful in other approaches, but knowing your contact's kids names, what sports they do, what area they live in, etc. makes a world of difference in the business relationship.

But more important than how you do it is that you DO do it. You gotta hustle.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Gear Maniac
 

Lorne,

My point was sort of that we live in a different world than we did 20 years ago. If you have lasting relationships where you can do lunch with a publisher, that's awesome. I was getting at, nowadays, it's hard to get a returned phone call or email, let alone lunch. Technology has caught up were many, not all, prefer emails or links.

Best,

Danny




Quote:
Originally Posted by lornemalvo View Post
Be cynical by all means Danny. I think that is often the best way. I've given my advice and explained why I think F2F is important in building long-term professional relationships so please feel free to take it on board or not.

Everyone has their own approach. This worked for me and hey, by some miracle I'm still here after nearly 20 years as a professional composer in an impossible industry! I guess F2F wouldn't work for everyone though. It is difficult to do but I have found that the most difficult paths lead to the bigger rewards and a more interesting life. I get a little queasy if things are too easy. That means that everyone will be doing that 'thing' too. Professionally and musically, I want to be doing what those other 12 million composers aren't doing.

If sending SC demos and emailing works for people then that's great! There really is no right or wrong answer.

I wish you all the best.

LM
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
People are still people no matter what technology they use. There is nothing better than sitting down for coffee or lunch to discuss possibilities. Yes, there is zero doubt that it is more difficult to pull off, but so is making a career in music.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny Scott View Post
I was getting at, nowadays, it's hard to get a returned phone call or email, let alone lunch. Technology has caught up were many, not all, prefer emails or links.
Hiya.

Yes it is hard. But my colleagues do it. I do it. Looks like Dr.Bill does it. John Fulford seems to do it. Those that do it seem successful.

And yes, I have heard of this thing they call technology and dial-up modems and email and stuff like that. I also heard a rumour you can watch videos online but I don't believe it. I'm sure I saw something about that when I was searching on Altavista the other day.

Aaaanyway, last word on this as I am starting to bore myself and everybody else with repeating the same thing but here goes...

If you ('you' in a general sense here) plan on making a long career in this business, and one which makes you a living wage that buys toothpaste / food / holidays / houses / cars / fuel / drink / netflix subs / t-shirts / christmas presents / cat food / lightbulbs / pensions / health insurance / life insurance / car insurance / house insurance / pet insurance / phone insurance / dental insurance / phone contract / shoelaces / pays bills etc., - not to mention music gear, then you are going to have to be busy every day, of every week, of every month, of every year, for a couple of decades at least (and with good publishers of course). Thusly, it goes without saying that you are gonna need a constant, loooooooooooooooooooooong stream of albums and tracks. If you are a professional and need to survive and pay bills you cannot have any downtime.

The foundations for this constant stream of year-on-year work comes from nurturing personal relationships developed from face to face meetings. This is as true today as it ever was.

Good luck to you if you think you can generate the required longevity and throughput through emails and links. I know you can get gigs this way but this is not the point I am making. I have popped in for a chat with a publisher and come out with a year's worth of work on several occasions. I could not do this with email/links.

All the best folks. I'm off to update my Netscape browser and dust my modem.

Over and out.

Lorne
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Gear Addict
 

This gave me a couple of YouTube video ideas.

I'd add to this...make music that libraries want to BUY. Most libraries can get rap beats, EDM instrumentals and tension beds by the hundreds. But a nice album of traditional Italian instrumentals are hard to come by.

Also...ask if the libraries sub-publishers are in need of anything. If one of my sub-publishers tells me they need a certain type of music, I immediately set out to make an album of what they need. I should do a video about this to explain in more detail..
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