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Rates for Sound-effects license for Film and Film Trailers? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 12th August 2018
  #1
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Rates for Sound-effects license for Film and Film Trailers?

I see PRS has a rate sheet for license cost for music (for companies being part of PRS in the UK).
Films and trailers production music

Are there any similar rates cards for sounds effects licensing for film and film trailers?
Old 12th August 2018
  #2
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It's varied. Different trailer houses and studios have different budgets depending on the trailer (main, TV spot etc)

Even then, one trailer music company may low ball and one might quote a fee too high.
Old 12th August 2018
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amber View Post
It's varied. Different trailer houses and studios have different budgets depending on the trailer (main, TV spot etc)

Even then, one trailer music company may low ball and one might quote a fee too high.
So no similar things to the PRS music rate card, then?

As to the cost, ultimately, do you know, Amber, will it be the film studio picking up the cost or will it be the Trailer house?
Old 15th August 2018
  #4
Sound effects, at least here in the US, are usually a buyout. So the trailer house or the studio buys the sound effects package retail and then they never need to come back and "license" it again and they can use it as much as they want in anything they want. That is usually the difference between calling something a "sound effect" and calling something "sound design". Sound design is assumed to be a composition and is licensed as a music cue and follows the normal going rates for that type of use.
Old 15th August 2018
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
Sound effects, at least here in the US, are usually a buyout. So the trailer house or the studio buys the sound effects package retail and then they never need to come back and "license" it again and they can use it as much as they want in anything they want. That is usually the difference between calling something a "sound effect" and calling something "sound design". Sound design is assumed to be a composition and is licensed as a music cue and follows the normal going rates for that type of use.
Ah, I see, thanks for the input, Etch!
Old 15th August 2018
  #6
Here is an example of a big "sound effects" library. This is what a lot of trailer houses use for "sound effects".

Sound Effects Libraries Categories | Sound Ideas

Here are a couple examples of sound design albums...

Annihilator Tools - Sound Design Toolkit

Aleatoric Sound Design 3 - Orchestral Stabs, Hits, And Effects

Crash, Bash, And Thrash 3 - Percussion And Sound Design Hits

Strange Strings - Sound Design Strings

The Sound Ideas catalogs are considered sound effects and are "bought" the way you would buy a sample pack or virtual instrument, and the buyer can use it as much as they want for as long as they want in as many different projects as they want.

The sound design albums I linked to are "licensed" and are considered musical compositions, not sound effects. They are registered with the PROs, pay royalties if aired on TV Broadcast, and the license is always only for a specific use during a specific time period to a specific region.
Old 16th August 2018
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
Here is an example of a big "sound effects" library. This is what a lot of trailer houses use for "sound effects".

Sound Effects Libraries Categories | Sound Ideas

Here are a couple examples of sound design albums...

Annihilator Tools - Sound Design Toolkit

Aleatoric Sound Design 3 - Orchestral Stabs, Hits, And Effects

Crash, Bash, And Thrash 3 - Percussion And Sound Design Hits

Strange Strings - Sound Design Strings

The Sound Ideas catalogs are considered sound effects and are "bought" the way you would buy a sample pack or virtual instrument, and the buyer can use it as much as they want for as long as they want in as many different projects as they want.

The sound design albums I linked to are "licensed" and are considered musical compositions, not sound effects. They are registered with the PROs, pay royalties if aired on TV Broadcast, and the license is always only for a specific use during a specific time period to a specific region.
Thanks, very informative.

As to music rates in the US compared to UK, I see from the PRS sheet (see attached snipped from the sheet, with music rates for trailers) that the rate for the use of a music piece would be £9,500 for worldwide all media, not depending on how much of the song one uses, as far as I can understand from the info there.
How does this compare to rates in the US, are they generally a little bit higher in the US?

And, perhaps in the US it is based on how many seconds too, or is the usual quote for uncapped usage not related to length?

I would guess the sound design hits would be very expensive if not somehow based on length?
Attached Thumbnails
Rates for Sound-effects license for Film and Film Trailers?-prs-rates-film-trailers-2018.jpg  
Old 16th August 2018
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by NFL View Post
Thanks, very informative.

As to music rates in the US compared to UK, I see from the PRS sheet (see attached snipped from the sheet, with music rates for trailers) that the rate for the use of a music piece would be £9,500 for worldwide all media, not depending on how much of the song one uses, as far as I can understand from the info there.
How does this compare to rates in the US, are they generally a little bit higher in the US?

And, perhaps in the US it is based on how many seconds too, or is the usual quote for uncapped usage not related to length?

I would guess the sound design hits would be very expensive if not somehow based on length?
9500 GBP is about $12,000 US.

For a theatrical trailer cue use that is pretty low for the US. Theatrical trailers in the US for musical cues is between $20,000 to $40,000.

The price varies based on how the music is used, length of music excerpt used, the territories and/or markets the spot will play in, and the length the spot will run in those markets. Where the spot falls within the campaign timeline also plays a part in the rate. A teaser trailer or the first theatrical trailer is going to pay a lot more than the “own it on Blu-ray and digital download” tv spot. First run TV trailers pay more than end of campaign tv trailers. If the spot is going to be worldwide it pays more then if it is US only, and US only pays more than a regional spot. And so on.

Also if they are going to make multiple variations of a spot will be a higher license fee than if it is just one spot total.

The other interesting thing that most people do when requesting a license is they try to put everything possible in there even if they aren’t using it, just to try and get all the rights at a lower price. So they will say over the phone they need a quote for an internet only MOBS (making of/behind the scenes) use of a 10 second clip of a cue... but then you get the license request and it says in addition to the internet only MOBS the client “reserves the right” to use up to the full length of the cue in any promotional or marketing spots for this particular film, including TV and theatrical worldwide, in perpetuity.

Lol. No joke, this happens all the time. So the license they are really technically asking for is a $40,000 license, and depending on how early in the campaign it is, it could even be worth as much as $80,000 or $100,000.

So then you quote $40,000... the client comes back and says something to the effect of “wow!!! The sticker shock is killing me, you want to charge me $40k for an internet only MOBS?!?!” Lol. To which my reply is always “you said on the phone it was MOBS, but the quote request isn’t for an MOBS, it’s for all present and future marketing assets associated with this films campaign worldwide for life. I can only quote you what is on the request.” Then they play dumb like they didn’t realize they were asking for all these rights... then I get a new quote request with “up to 10 seconds only of the cue in an internet only MOBS that will air be available for streaming, viewing for no longer than 12 months. With the option to negotiate additional rights in good faith should the need arise.”

And then for that the quote is $1000~$2000 depending on the cue and it’s production value.

Make sense?

The PRS and other societies in other countries have kind of homogenized the music licensing process and in doing so they have stripped away a lot of the value of music. Whereas here in the US, the type of use is only one factor in determining the price, and the budget of the film is just another one of the many determining factors (notice the top tier for PRS is movies with a $3mil budget or higher?! Lol. Here in Hollywood $3mil is considered a low/no budget movie. Our pricing tiers go up to the $100’s of millions), and with other societies outside the US, the type of use can sometimes be the only factor in determining the price. Production value, length of term, region/area of use, etc are not even factors.
Old 17th August 2018
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Etch-A-Sketch View Post
9500 GBP is about $12,000 US.

For a theatrical trailer cue use that is pretty low for the US. Theatrical trailers in the US for musical cues is between $20,000 to $40,000.

The price varies based on how the music is used, length of music excerpt used, the territories and/or markets the spot will play in, and the length the spot will run in those markets. Where the spot falls within the campaign timeline also plays a part in the rate. A teaser trailer or the first theatrical trailer is going to pay a lot more than the “own it on Blu-ray and digital download” tv spot. First run TV trailers pay more than end of campaign tv trailers. If the spot is going to be worldwide it pays more then if it is US only, and US only pays more than a regional spot. And so on.

Also if they are going to make multiple variations of a spot will be a higher license fee than if it is just one spot total.

The other interesting thing that most people do when requesting a license is they try to put everything possible in there even if they aren’t using it, just to try and get all the rights at a lower price. So they will say over the phone they need a quote for an internet only MOBS (making of/behind the scenes) use of a 10 second clip of a cue... but then you get the license request and it says in addition to the internet only MOBS the client “reserves the right” to use up to the full length of the cue in any promotional or marketing spots for this particular film, including TV and theatrical worldwide, in perpetuity.

Lol. No joke, this happens all the time. So the license they are really technically asking for is a $40,000 license, and depending on how early in the campaign it is, it could even be worth as much as $80,000 or $100,000.

So then you quote $40,000... the client comes back and says something to the effect of “wow!!! The sticker shock is killing me, you want to charge me $40k for an internet only MOBS?!?!” Lol. To which my reply is always “you said on the phone it was MOBS, but the quote request isn’t for an MOBS, it’s for all present and future marketing assets associated with this films campaign worldwide for life. I can only quote you what is on the request.” Then they play dumb like they didn’t realize they were asking for all these rights... then I get a new quote request with “up to 10 seconds only of the cue in an internet only MOBS that will air be available for streaming, viewing for no longer than 12 months. With the option to negotiate additional rights in good faith should the need arise.”

And then for that the quote is $1000~$2000 depending on the cue and it’s production value.

Make sense?

The PRS and other societies in other countries have kind of homogenized the music licensing process and in doing so they have stripped away a lot of the value of music. Whereas here in the US, the type of use is only one factor in determining the price, and the budget of the film is just another one of the many determining factors (notice the top tier for PRS is movies with a $3mil budget or higher?! Lol. Here in Hollywood $3mil is considered a low/no budget movie. Our pricing tiers go up to the $100’s of millions), and with other societies outside the US, the type of use can sometimes be the only factor in determining the price. Production value, length of term, region/area of use, etc are not even factors.
Thanks, that was a great read and with lots of info, very informative, thanks again.
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