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Best technique
Old 8th April 2019
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Best technique

Frankly I know that so much music in games is underrated and so on. But I wonder if we see like stuff like serial composition in games. After all, the most impressive feats of serial composition can perhaps be found, intelligently speaking, in the music of Jeremy Soule.

"The idea is distributed in space. It isn't only in one part; one part can't express the idea any longer, only the union of parts can completely express the idea. The idea found it necessary to be presented by several parts. After that, there was a rapid flowering of polyphony." - A. Webern
Old 8th April 2019
  #2
Gear Nut
 

Webern is such a great composer (the man I quoted), even though his whole oeuvre is clearly based on a very Germanic careerism.
Old 9th April 2019
  #3
Gear Nut
 

I say careerism, but maybe I mean chivalry
Old 9th April 2019
  #4
Gear Nut
 

I mean the meaning Webern (doesn't) really once means because I can't make heads or tails of it, really. But, darig thught maks the world ge rund, I wull she. So, whoever chooss the wool wold, giving his all he does rule. I am not sure why I wrote like that.
Old 12th April 2019
  #5
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badmark's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eggiebertus View Post
Frankly I know that so much music in games is underrated and so on. But I wonder if we see like stuff like serial composition in games. After all, the most impressive feats of serial composition can perhaps be found, intelligently speaking, in the music of Jeremy Soule.

"The idea is distributed in space. It isn't only in one part; one part can't express the idea any longer, only the union of parts can completely express the idea. The idea found it necessary to be presented by several parts. After that, there was a rapid flowering of polyphony." - A. Webern
Lol now I know who did the music for Elder Scrolls:Oblivion, guess I never clicked on the credits.

I think something like the short answer to your question is that yes, on a 'formal' level of composition there are links between Webern's serialism and how games music is put together, but his was an exercise in micro-tonalities whereas games music is more about micro-melodies.

No Man'''s Sky'''s music and how it was made | WIRED UK

the nature of a computer game as opposed to scoring a film means that the music's never quite sure what action it's about to be soundtracking. It could be anything because the player's got agency. Having a soft, ambient soundtrack that can react very quickly tends to work best, but obviously the further you go in that direction the less memorable, the less melodic it becomes.

So no, in terms of music as 'system', games music probably owes a lot more to Brian Eno. And if pressed, I'd add that Jeremy Soule's music sounds a lot more like a pure late-romanticist like Erich Korngold than it does Webern. Sort of from the same kind of world but proceeding to very different conclusions.
Old 12th April 2019
  #6
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by badmark View Post
Lol now I know who did the music for Elder Scrolls:Oblivion, guess I never clicked on the credits.

I think something like the short answer to your question is that yes, on a 'formal' level of composition there are links between Webern's serialism and how games music is put together, but his was an exercise in micro-tonalities whereas games music is more about micro-melodies.

No Man'''s Sky'''s music and how it was made | WIRED UK

the nature of a computer game as opposed to scoring a film means that the music's never quite sure what action it's about to be soundtracking. It could be anything because the player's got agency. Having a soft, ambient soundtrack that can react very quickly tends to work best, but obviously the further you go in that direction the less memorable, the less melodic it becomes.

So no, in terms of music as 'system', games music probably owes a lot more to Brian Eno. And if pressed, I'd add that Jeremy Soule's music sounds a lot more like a pure late-romanticist like Erich Korngold than it does Webern. Sort of from the same kind of world but proceeding to very different conclusions.
I get where you are getting these thoughts, but it's not true. I was referring to Jeremy Soule because serialism, to me, means what I illustrated with the quote, a kind of new quality to the music that is not found in tonality at all. But I cannot deny that we see the marked - commercial - influence of Brian Eno.
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