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Split vocals off over different tracks
Old 6th February 2015
  #1
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Split vocals off over different tracks

"Split vocals off over different tracks" or Multing"

What does this mean exactly, and how is it done in Pro Tools?

It is simply a matter of duplicating tracks or rerouting tracks to aux tracks? I usually see these terms when people are talking about parallel processing.

Thanks.

Last edited by Alrod; 7th February 2015 at 12:00 AM..
Old 7th February 2015
  #2
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Drumsound's Avatar
Its a term that goes back to mixing consoles. At that patchbay you could 'multiply' a track off the tape deck and have it come up on several faders. You would then treat them differently as needed for the song. For example on the lead voice you might have one with more low end and gently compression for the verses, and another with e heavy compression for choruses. This is just one very simple answer. You can creativly do a lot of things with mults.

In a modern DAW environment, one would probably duplicate the track.
Old 7th February 2015
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
Its a term that goes back to mixing consoles. At that patchbay you could 'multiply' a track off the tape deck and have it come up on several faders. You would then treat them differently as needed for the song. For example on the lead voice you might have one with more low end and gently compression for the verses, and another with e heavy compression for choruses. This is just one very simple answer. You can creativly do a lot of things with mults.

In a modern DAW environment, one would probably duplicate the track.
Thanks for clarifying. So basically it means duplicating a track or sending a track signal to an aux fro say... parallel processing?
Old 7th February 2015
  #4
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Drumsound's Avatar
An aux on a console is for sending to somewhere else, like an effect or headphones, a mult gives you a full channel strip to work with. A mult on a console is like a duplicate in a DAW. A send is just tapping off the sound to an auxiliary location.
Old 7th February 2015
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
An aux on a console is for sending to somewhere else, like an effect or headphones, a mult gives you a full channel strip to work with. A mult on a console is like a duplicate in a DAW. A send is just tapping off the sound to an auxiliary location.
I realize that there are no set rules, but what is the best practice for parallel processing aux, or multing?

Sorry to be a pain, but for clarification on terminology, does "splitting" the signal refer to aux or mult? I see these terms used interchangeably in articles which is why I am asking. For example:

"One of the things I like about Pro Tools, whether I'm mixing in the box or on the board, is the ability to split vocals off over different tracks, with different treatments on each. I'll have some moderate compression on the main lead vocal track, more often than not the Renaissance Vox, and I'll follow that with the good old Waves De?esser. On subgroups, I'll often use the UAD Precision De?esser, though not in this case. I will then split the vocal off to another track with more aggressive compression and EQ."
Old 7th February 2015
  #6
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Drumsound's Avatar
I believe you quote is more like a duplicate/mult. The vocal would be on 3-4 faders with inserts and aux sends available. If they are all playing at the same time, that would parallel processing, whereas if you used the inserts on one channel for all those plugins, they would run in series, one into the next.

I'll give you a routing example I use regularly: I usually set a drum parallel when I'm mixing with some pretty serious compression. In Pro Tools I set up a stereo aux input and route all the drums to it via an aux send. I match the panning on the send, make it post fader and set all the sends at unity. I put a stereo compressor on the Aux input. This compressor is set pretty aggressively. Then I blend the sound of the compressed drumset with individual channels.

On my console I do the same by using a stereo output bus, to the compressor input and route the output to two individual channels.

Does that help?
Old 7th February 2015
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
In a modern DAW environment, one would probably duplicate the track.
Except in Samplitude/Sequoia, where you don't need to. You just cut a track into segments ("objects") and apply whatever processing you like to each segment. And you still have track level processing options as well. Magix, they call it.

Don't like what you did? Want to try another approach? No problem: keep what you have, but start another "revolver track". (Trovial[huh?] factoid: the highest ever fee for use _one_ track of music, reputedly in the region of $200k, was for a track from Revolver).

Totally fubar'd? Not to worry. It's all non-destructive (unless you want otherwise). Magix... [I wish they would stop filling my inbox with flyers.]
Old 7th February 2015
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alrod View Post
I realize that there are no set rules, but what is the best practice for parallel processing aux, or multing?

Sorry to be a pain, but for clarification on terminology, does "splitting" the signal refer to aux or mult? I see these terms used interchangeably in articles which is why I am asking. For example:

"One of the things I like about Pro Tools, whether I'm mixing in the box or on the board, is the ability to split vocals off over different tracks, with different treatments on each. I'll have some moderate compression on the main lead vocal track, more often than not the Renaissance Vox, and I'll follow that with the good old Waves De?esser. On subgroups, I'll often use the UAD Precision De?esser, though not in this case. I will then split the vocal off to another track with more aggressive compression and EQ."
One thing they may be referring to, and is common with many people who mix, is simply moving parts of the performance to a different track, for different processing. For example, if the vocal is on track 9 and they want to process the verses differently than the chorus, they would move the verse sections to track 10 and insert different plugins on that track (or the same plugins with different settings, etc.). This would be to make it easier than trying to do lots of automation on one track, etc.

However this is not unique to Protools as you can do this in any DAW. He may have been talking about Protools vs. the days of tape (in that you have many more tracks to do this type of thing).
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