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Samplitude Pro X (Opinions) ?
Old 9th November 2018 | Show parent
  #181
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by not_so_new View Post
I used Samp for years (almost a decade now that I think about it)..... it was always really odd. Its a lot like driving a German car, nothing really seems to work the way it seems like it should, things were just never really intuitive. In a BMW SUV you push the tailgate button down to lift up the gate, just odd. But also like a German car, if you get past the quirkiness, Samp was a great machine to drive.
The German sports car analogy is a good one. If you just bought a Porsche, upgrading from a Saturn, you'll basically need to learn to drive all over again. I wanted to goose this thread to reiterate just how freaking powerful this program is. For me, it's like the Photoshop of DAWS – I can't imagine using anything else.

Of course, I'm highly biased, because I logged the long hours learning how to use all this power. Perhaps if I spent as much time with Reaper I'd come to appreciate it as much. But I'll say this about Samplitude: if you're willing to invest in the learning curve, you'll find it can do just about anything you can think of. The people who created this software are passionate about what they're doing, and it shows.

To the prospective buyer, the question is probably: Why would I commit to a such a little-known, relatively expensive program? Well, considering the lack of marketing, the mere fact that Samplitude still exists is a testimony to its virtue. To people who've delved into its abilities, Samplitude is often indispensable.

ProTools has market share because ProTools has market share -- it's the winner-take-all circular logic that governs the realm of software. Sonar and Cubase have always been good at marketing. Reaper made the laudable business decision to give away their software, and it's served them well. And Samplitude, meanwhile, relies on little more than word-of-mouth.

Perhaps watching the tutorial videos will help convince those on the fence. Trying to learn this program on your own can be a hard climb, and it may take more than 30 days to achieve full fluency. Years later, there are still features in Samplitude that I haven't explored.

For the new user, there are two areas that deserve special note: Samplitude was conceived around the idea of nondestructive object editing, and I don't know if any other program does it as elegantly. Once you've memorized/customized keyboard shortcuts, objects can be dragged, duplicated, resized, split, merged, grouped, and endlessly manipulated with ease. I can't think of a better "arranger" – you can even be shuffling objects during playback, if it suits your needs. Set your undo levels to 100 and experiment away. The same techniques work for MIDI or audio objects.

Second, the automation curves are powerful and fun, once you get the hang of them. Using keyboard shortcuts to switch "mouse modes", I'll often be manipulating volume curves during playback. Grab one or more handles on the curves and adjust levels as you listen. Did somebody hit a wrong note? Zoom in, add four volume handles, and notch it out. Someone mentioned mute automation – for me this is ideal mute automation.

I'll also put in a plug for Magix’s Movie Edit Pro – an inexpensive program that's basically Samplitude for video. I was delighted to discover that, having learned Samplitude, there was almost no learning curve -- and now I can apply all my object-editing tricks to video…

Last edited by tuner; 10th November 2018 at 01:09 AM..
Old 10th November 2018 | Show parent
  #182
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuner View Post
The German sports car analogy is a good one. If you just bought a Porsche, upgrading from a Saturn, you'll basically need to learn to drive all over again. I wanted to goose this thread to reiterate just how freaking powerful this program is. For me, it's like the Photoshop of DAWS – I can't imagine using anything else.

Of course, I'm highly biased, because I logged the long hours learning how to use all this power. Perhaps if I spent as much time with Reaper I'd come to appreciate it as much. But I'll say this about Samplitude: if you're willing to invest in the learning curve, you'll find it can do just about anything you can think of. The people who created this software are passionate about what they're doing, and it shows.

To the prospective buyer, the question is probably: Why would I commit to a such a little-known, relatively expensive program? Well, considering the lack of marketing, the mere fact that Samplitude still exists is a testimony to its virtue. To people who've delved into its abilities, Samplitude is often indispensable.

ProTools has market share because ProTools has market share -- it's the winner-take-all circular logic that governs the realm of software. Sonar and Cubase have always been good at marketing. Reaper made the laudable business decision to give away their software, and it's served them well. And Samplitude, meanwhile, relies on little more than word-of-mouth.

Perhaps watching the tutorial videos will help convince those on the fence. Trying to learn this program on your own can be a hard climb, and it may take more than 30 days to achieve full fluency. Years later, there are still features in Samplitude that I haven't explored.

For the new user, there are two areas that deserve special note: Samplitude was conceived around the idea of nondestructive object editing, and I don't know if any other program does it as elegantly. Once you've memorized/customized keyboard shortcuts, objects can be dragged, duplicated, resized, split, merged, grouped, and endlessly manipulated with ease. I can't think of a better "arranger" – you can even be shuffling objects during playback, if it suits your needs. Set your undo levels to 100 and experiment away. The same techniques work for MIDI or audio objects.

Second, the automation curves are powerful and fun, once you get the hang of them. Using keyboard shortcuts to switch "mouse modes", I'll often be manipulating volume curves during playback. Grab one or more handles on the curves and adjust levels as you listen. Did somebody hit a wrong note? Zoom in, add four volume handles, and notch it out. Someone mentioned mute automation – for me this is ideal mute automation.

I'll also put in a plug for Magix’s Movie Edit Pro – an inexpensive program that's basically Samplitude for video. I was delighted to discover that, having learned Samplitude, there was almost no learning curve -- and now I can apply all my object-editing tricks to video…
As I'm not really familiar with all the ins and outs of X, I'm not here to tell you that your Samplitude love is misplaced. But how do you explain how Magix basically can't even give it away? While I don't have access to their recent sales figures, their recent offer of roughly $150 for all kinds of good stuff including the next version of X, Wavelab, and a bunch of other goodies didn't seem to generate much of a buzz.

I suspect that as you suggest X runs very well and is very powerful. That said, it still looks a lot like an engineering environment which may be why it doesn't appear to be a compelling purchase for creative types.
Old 10th November 2018 | Show parent
  #183
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg View Post
As I'm not really familiar with all the ins and outs of X, I'm not here to tell you that your Samplitude love is misplaced. But how do you explain how Magix basically can't even give it away? While I don't have access to their recent sales figures, their recent offer of roughly $150 for all kinds of good stuff including the next version of X, Wavelab, and a bunch of other goodies didn't seem to generate much of a buzz.

I suspect that as you suggest X runs very well and is very powerful. That said, it still looks a lot like an engineering environment which may be why it doesn't appear to be a compelling purchase for creative types.
Cool -- is that offer expired? I could use another license, but couldn't find it.

Sadly, it sounds like their "no marketing" strategy is catching up with them. It seems that, as the brands copy from each other, there's less and less to differentiate one DAW from the other, and it comes down more to marketing and pricing.

As I've said, my love for Samp is partly due to our long years together. I know it like my favorite guitar. My requirement from a DAW is minimal left-brain exertion, because I'm a musician, not an engineer. One first encounter, Samp may not seem "intuitive," but over time it's become, for me, very much so. It mostly just stays out of the way and lets me make music...

Last edited by tuner; 10th November 2018 at 07:39 AM..
Old 10th November 2018 | Show parent
  #184
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuner View Post
Cool -- is that offer expired? I could use another license, but couldn't find it.

Sadly, it sounds like their "no marketing" strategy is catching up with them. It seems that, as the brands copy from each other, there's less and less to differentiate one DAW from the other, and it comes down more to marketing and pricing.

As I've said, my love for Samp is partly due to our long years together. I know it like my favorite guitar. My requirement from a DAW is minimal left-brain exertion, because I'm a musician, not an engineer. One first encounter, Samp may not seem "intuitive," but over time it's become, for me, very much so. It mostly just stays out of the way and lets me make music...
Save 90% off Samplitude Pro X3 Suite incl. X4 Upgrade & SpectraLayers Pro 5

Notice that at the end of that page you see the Samplitude slogan: "the engineer's choice." I don't know everything, but I don't think that's going to appeal to creatives, particularly ones just starting out.

That said, it is a rather startling offer when you consider all the extras on offer. I definitely thought about it!
Old 11th November 2018 | Show parent
  #185
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg View Post
Save 90% off Samplitude Pro X3 Suite incl. X4 Upgrade & SpectraLayers Pro 5

Notice that at the end of that page you see the Samplitude slogan: "the engineer's choice." I don't know everything, but I don't think that's going to appeal to creatives, particularly ones just starting out.

That said, it is a rather startling offer when you consider all the extras on offer. I definitely thought about it!
Thanks -- I got it!

Magix has a slew of products for beginners (and even Movie Edit Pro records 99 tracks of audio), but at that price I'd say just jump in the deep end.

Of course some folks are creating CDs on their cell phone, so whatever works...
Old 11th November 2018 | Show parent
  #186
Lives for gear
Like many, I've always thought Samplitude was greatly underappreciated. I'm a long-time Samplitude user who has also been using Reaper the last 2+ years. I spent the time to learn both, and I still use both. Previously I did an album in Pro Tools, then one in Samplitude, and another still in Reaper.

I hate Pro Tools. It is bloated, inefficient, and unbelievably tempermental. i have a hard time finding anything good to say about it. Between Reaper and Samplitude, I use Reaper more. While your opinion is that you can do anything you can think of in Samp, I think that description applies more to Reaper. It is an astounding piece of software. The power, flexibility, and efficiency are unparalleled. But like that German car, what Samplitude does well, it does extremely well. It's still my favorite for editing, though Reaper comes close. It's auto-crossfade mode is worth its weight in gold. But Reaper is far more efficient and flexible overall.

One thing about Samplitude is that the pace of development appears to have slowed down quite a bit, almost to a crawl. There are not many new features appearing. I'm guessing the developers have moved on to other projects and only work in Samp periodically. That's how it feels anyway. In contrast, Reaper is constantly moving and evolving. It's an extremely small development team (two programmers, I think) yet they are constantly creating new features and improving old ones.

For someone buying new, I would suggest Reaper, but Samplitude is still an excellent product.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuner View Post
The German sports car analogy is a good one. If you just bought a Porsche, upgrading from a Saturn, you'll basically need to learn to drive all over again. I wanted to goose this thread to reiterate just how freaking powerful this program is. For me, it's like the Photoshop of DAWS – I can't imagine using anything else.

Of course, I'm highly biased, because I logged the long hours learning how to use all this power. Perhaps if I spent as much time with Reaper I'd come to appreciate it as much. But I'll say this about Samplitude: if you're willing to invest in the learning curve, you'll find it can do just about anything you can think of. The people who created this software are passionate about what they're doing, and it shows.

To the prospective buyer, the question is probably: Why would I commit to a such a little-known, relatively expensive program? Well, considering the lack of marketing, the mere fact that Samplitude still exists is a testimony to its virtue. To people who've delved into its abilities, Samplitude is often indispensable.

ProTools has market share because ProTools has market share -- it's the winner-take-all circular logic that governs the realm of software. Sonar and Cubase have always been good at marketing. Reaper made the laudable business decision to give away their software, and it's served them well. And Samplitude, meanwhile, relies on little more than word-of-mouth.

Perhaps watching the tutorial videos will help convince those on the fence. Trying to learn this program on your own can be a hard climb, and it may take more than 30 days to achieve full fluency. Years later, there are still features in Samplitude that I haven't explored.

For the new user, there are two areas that deserve special note: Samplitude was conceived around the idea of nondestructive object editing, and I don't know if any other program does it as elegantly. Once you've memorized/customized keyboard shortcuts, objects can be dragged, duplicated, resized, split, merged, grouped, and endlessly manipulated with ease. I can't think of a better "arranger" – you can even be shuffling objects during playback, if it suits your needs. Set your undo levels to 100 and experiment away. The same techniques work for MIDI or audio objects.

Second, the automation curves are powerful and fun, once you get the hang of them. Using keyboard shortcuts to switch "mouse modes", I'll often be manipulating volume curves during playback. Grab one or more handles on the curves and adjust levels as you listen. Did somebody hit a wrong note? Zoom in, add four volume handles, and notch it out. Someone mentioned mute automation – for me this is ideal mute automation.

I'll also put in a plug for Magix’s Movie Edit Pro – an inexpensive program that's basically Samplitude for video. I was delighted to discover that, having learned Samplitude, there was almost no learning curve -- and now I can apply all my object-editing tricks to video…
Old 12th November 2018 | Show parent
  #187
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drichard View Post
Like many, I've always thought Samplitude was greatly underappreciated. I'm a long-time Samplitude user who has also been using Reaper the last 2+ years. I spent the time to learn both, and I still use both. Previously I did an album in Pro Tools, then one in Samplitude, and another still in Reaper.

I hate Pro Tools. It is bloated, inefficient, and unbelievably tempermental. i have a hard time finding anything good to say about it. Between Reaper and Samplitude, I use Reaper more. While your opinion is that you can do anything you can think of in Samp, I think that description applies more to Reaper. It is an astounding piece of software. The power, flexibility, and efficiency are unparalleled. But like that German car, what Samplitude does well, it does extremely well. It's still my favorite for editing, though Reaper comes close. It's auto-crossfade mode is worth its weight in gold. But Reaper is far more efficient and flexible overall.

One thing about Samplitude is that the pace of development appears to have slowed down quite a bit, almost to a crawl. There are not many new features appearing. I'm guessing the developers have moved on to other projects and only work in Samp periodically. That's how it feels anyway. In contrast, Reaper is constantly moving and evolving. It's an extremely small development team (two programmers, I think) yet they are constantly creating new features and improving old ones.

For someone buying new, I would suggest Reaper, but Samplitude is still an excellent product.
Good to know! I tried to "bond" with Reaper a few years ago, when Samp's bugs were really bugging me, but it sounds like it deserves another try.

So here's a question you could answer: Which program is buggier?
Old 12th November 2018 | Show parent
  #188
Lives for gear
Compared to my experiences with Pro Tools, both are light years better for reliability and lack of bugs. Overall, both have been reliable, while PT continues to be a buggy piece of crap. The short answer is that I don't think one is better than the other. Neither is perfect, both are very good.

I had a couple of plugin compatibility issues with Reaper, but otherwise it works quite well. As for Samplitude, most of my problems with it have been with bigger projects. It bogs down on my system (an older PC) if I add too many plugins. Playback stutters and it becomes hard to work. Reaper uses a technique called "Anticipative FX" which pre-calculates some of the FX processing, and on my system I can get roughly double the number of plugins as Samplitude. I've never had a project get too big for Reaper. If you have a powerhouse system or only do smaller projects, that shouldn't be an issue. For comparison, I get about the same amount of FX in Samplitude as Pro Tools, but Reaper beats both by a very large margin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuner View Post
Good to know! I tried to "bond" with Reaper a few years ago, when Samp's bugs were really bugging me, but it sounds like it deserves another try.

So here's a question you could answer: Which program is buggier?
Old 12th November 2018 | Show parent
  #189
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by drichard View Post
...
Samplitude-preferences-system/audio-monitoring/engine mode

Engine mode changes can improve cpu/ram usage but I never made a test, worth a try though when starting to mix.
Old 12th November 2018 | Show parent
  #190
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I tried the different engine modes, but it did not improve enough to work well with large projects.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cooker View Post
Samplitude-preferences-system/audio-monitoring/engine mode

Engine mode changes can improve cpu/ram usage but I never made a test, worth a try though when starting to mix.
Old 13th November 2018 | Show parent
  #191
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spectacular g's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuner View Post
Good to know! I tried to "bond" with Reaper a few years ago, when Samp's bugs were really bugging me, but it sounds like it deserves another try.

So here's a question you could answer: Which program is buggier?
Depending on the type of work you do? I have settled in well with Studio One.

Sequoia for mastering only anymore.

G
Old 13th November 2018 | Show parent
  #192
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jazzcabbage's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuner View Post
Good to know! I tried to "bond" with Reaper a few years ago, when Samp's bugs were really bugging me, but it sounds like it deserves another try.

So here's a question you could answer: Which program is buggier?
Try it again and install a theme you like, I'm currently smitten with the Fusion RJ theme. I wouldn't say either are really buggy. I had a few issues with Samp here and there over the years and I think most were audio-interface related. I did take a break from it a while back though but came back to it more recently.

It was during the initial S1 v2 hype I left Samp and I tried S1 but I came to find it was a bit crippled compared to others at the time -worked with Reaper about the same time and felt the same way fwiw-.
I moved over to Cubase and worked with that for a while but there were a few annoying things about that app that drove me nuts and the rent-a-DAW yearly upgrade model was leaving a bad taste in my mouth.

I came back to Samp more recently with that crazy deal they had/have going on. It was like riding a bicycle but this time around I missed all the various features that I liked in the other apps I demo'd and used since my time away from it.

So... I gave Reaper another chance because it's come a long way being rock solid, and fully featured. And more importantly the big thing for me is you can tailor it to have the look, feel, and workflow you like in other apps.
I created a template that suits my needs, it's a bit like a "best of DAW" for me. I'm using Samp for post production now as it's an incredibly powerful audio editor and I know it like the back of my hand.

Old 14th November 2018 | Show parent
  #193
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It's the name Reaper as in Grim Reaper that puts me off, as I don't want to think about death every time I fire up the program.

S1 is great as long as you mostly use VSTIs as opposed to hardware MIDI, because its implementation of that is absolutely primitive.

I'm about to see how I get on with Cubase because of the "external instruments" issue in S1 which they're never gonna change -- and I'm going to be doing a lot more MIDI than audio. The Rent-A model does indeed suck, especially when you factor in that I haven't spent a dime on S1 since 2013, and, no, I haven't felt inhibited in the slightest about remaining on V2.6. The studio musician who makes the most money of anyone I know is on Pro Tools 6!

I think we can safely conclude that the current Samp offer (I think it was actually $150, not $199 a few weeks ago!) is the best deal (other than Reaper) out there. I'm sure there's a lot to like about Samp, I have no doubt. I just think it will be a lot easier to learn Cubase with so many available help videos.

Logic does look alluring but not enough to move to Mac land.

Last edited by troggg; 14th November 2018 at 06:28 PM..
Old 14th November 2018 | Show parent
  #194
Lives for gear
If it helps, the acronym means "Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording". Maybe if you think that way you can get past the name. S1 is a good product too and, like Reaper, continues to evolve. It depends on which is more suited for how you work. I demo'd S1 for a while, and certain things about it were really well done, but other things worked differently than my preference and I couldn't seem to get past them. Maybe with time I would have adapted, but I'm happy with Reaper and Samplitude, so no need to buy another DAW.



Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg View Post
It's the name Reaper as in Grim Reaper that puts me off, as I don't want to think about death every time I fire up the program.

S1 is great as long as you mostly use VSTIs as opposed to hardware MIDI, because its implementation of that is absolutely primitive.

I'm about to see how I get on with Cubase because of the "external instruments" issue in S1 which they're never gonna change -- and I'm going to be doing a lot more MIDI than audio. The Rent-A model does indeed suck, especially when you factor in that I haven't spent a dime on S1 since 2013, and, no, I haven't felt inhibited in the slightest about remaining on V2.6. The studio musician I know who makes the most money of anyone I know is on Pro Tools 6!

I think we can safely conclude that the current Samp offer (I think it was actually $150, not $199 a few weeks ago!) is the best deal (other than Reaper) out there. I'm sure there's a lot to like about it, I have no doubt. I just think it will be a lot easier to learn Cubase with so many available help videos.

Logic does look alluring but not enough to move to Mac land.
Old 14th November 2018 | Show parent
  #195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drichard View Post
If it helps, the acronym means "Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording".
Actually I never knew that, so thanks!

btw, one thing that really attracted me about S1 five years ago was that the Presonus owners and developers appeared often on the forum and engaged with the members. Then that abruptly ended and Presonus acted like every other corporation, distant and too good to engage with the peasants. I remember at the same time I bought S1 that the REAPER developers were good about returning emails. Anything changed or are they still communicative?
Old 14th November 2018 | Show parent
  #196
Lives for gear
They are good, but there really isn't much need to communicate with them directly. The Reaper Forum is one of the most busy and helpful places you can possibly imagine. I have gotten detailed answers to some of the most obscure questions. And there are dozens of free training videos done by a Reaper user named Kenny Gioia (sp) that help you learn just about everything there is to know. Just about every major feature (and many minor ones) are covered. It is one of the most vital and alive software communities I've ever seen.

The development team is small (2 developers), so I think most people respect that they are busy coding and developing software, and try not to take up much of their time with personal requests, but they do communicate there regularly. There are public beta versions of the software, and they interact directly with people doing beta tests daily.


Quote:
Originally Posted by troggg View Post
Actually I never knew that, so thanks!

btw, one thing that really attracted me about S1 five years ago was that the Presonus owners and developers appeared often on the forum and engaged with the members. Then that abruptly ended and Presonus acted like every other corporation, distant and too good to engage with the peasants. I remember at the same time I bought S1 that the REAPER developers were good about returning emails. Anything changed or are they still communicative?
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