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When Programming drums, what velocity do you use??
Old 15th September 2011
  #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leechlife View Post
Hi

I don't wanna be insulting but I think the question is pretty stupid. I grew up as a drummer and there is not a velocity you program drums at.
The dynamics and variations make the difference and add a lot to the overall grove.

Consider most mixes get compressed in the end to death, the only thing that is left is the felt dynamics you get by having many different velocites resulting in different sounds (which then compress are nearly on the same volume, but not the same texture ).

And to argue drums sound particular good a certain midi velocities thats pure nonsense. You might be right for a particular taste and a particular drum library, but consider the amount of libs out there and non will sound the same at vel = 100.

So it very much depends on what you want in the end, but fixing velocities for particular sound is never a good idea. It's best to utilise the whole dynamics range in vels across all drum kit components, of course depending on the application.

cheers
This.

And I will add... most people associate quantizing with the problem of getting drums to sound "more human" or "less human". When, in fact, it's dynamics that are MUCH more of a factor when determining whether something is "more human" or "less human" sounding.

This is one of the reasons that some producers cheered wildly when drum machines were invented. We'd give our right arm for a drummer that could play "time" like a drum machine could in those days. The fact that drummers reacted and adapted and started becoming much more cognizant of their "time" was an outgrowth of that phase and era. They simply had to up their game to stay in the ball-game.

Dynamics, mang! And that's all about FEEL. PLAY your drum parts... don't program them!
Old 15th September 2011
  #32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jroode View Post
This is one of the reasons that some producers cheered wildly when drum machines were invented. We'd give our right arm for a drummer that could play "time" like a drum machine could in those days. The fact that drummers reacted and adapted and started becoming much more cognizant of their "time" was an outgrowth of that phase and era. They simply had to up their game to stay in the ball-game.
Ironically, drum machines are rarely programmed dynamically. The use of drum machines pretty much pioneered the one velocity drum performance.
Second irony.....
I was around throughout this whole period and chatted with well known producers who championed the timing accuracy of drum machines and computers. If you got around to discussing their favourite albums or even drum performances they almost to a man raved about recordings that had out of time drums - like classic soul or Motown, classic 60's pop like The Beatles and Stones.
Old 16th September 2011
  #33
Lives for gear
 
mhs2xs's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso View Post
Ironically, drum machines are rarely programmed dynamically. The use of drum machines pretty much pioneered the one velocity drum performance.
Second irony.....
I was around throughout this whole period and chatted with well known producers who championed the timing accuracy of drum machines and computers. If you got around to discussing their favourite albums or even drum performances they almost to a man raved about recordings that had out of time drums - like classic soul or Motown, classic 60's pop like The Beatles and Stones.
Yeah, I don't doubt that for a minute. More like hypocrisy than irony. I don't know who all these drummers were that were so "enlightened" by Dr Rhythm.

I'm from the crustaceous era of cavemen. We bashed things with a stick to the rhythm of a monotonously maddening little pagan idol, forged of wood and metal, called a metro-gnome. Which predated the box o' beats if I'm not mistaken. It was not an exercise we took lightly. But, in the end, we were still human. Or, at least we hung around humans. All those recordings from this era, prior to digital editing and the ability to move every wave form so it lined up exactly to every beat and tick in the box, are just totally un-listenable now.

All hail the demise of the knuckle draggers! They make too much noise and smell funky.
Old 24th September 2011
  #34
@ Rogerdodger

I go for as realistic a performance as possible from AD, and people always think it's a real drummer when I show them the tunes I use it for. It's a great program.

can't wait to go back and fix the velocities on my songs. at 127 my high tom sounds like a cowbell!
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