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Crikey - Apple release four button mouse
Old 2nd August 2005
  #1
Mindreader
 
BevvyB's Avatar
 

Crikey - Apple release four button mouse

http://www.apple.com/uk/mightymouse/

Bev
Old 2nd August 2005
  #2
Lives for gear
 
max cooper's Avatar
 

Cool! Wonder why it took them so long, though? Multi-button meece arrived sometime between fire and the wheel.

Looks nice, though.
Old 2nd August 2005
  #3
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Johnny B's Avatar
 

I like track balls with buttons and a scroll wheel.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #4
What's wrong with a regular old scroll wheel, I can't help but wonder? What's easier, moving your index or middle finger -- or moving your whole hand and wrist?

Everytime I use the G5 iMac one of my clients does his graphics on it's like stepping back into some horrible time warp. I flippin' hate that no button mouse. Combine that with the slug-in-molasses speed of the OS on the machine and it's just a lose-lose situation.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #5
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pulsar modular's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1
What's wrong with a regular old scroll wheel, I can't help but wonder? What's easier, moving your index or middle finger -- or moving your whole hand and wrist?

Everytime I use the G5 iMac one of my clients does his graphics on it's like stepping back into some horrible time warp. I flippin' hate that no button mouse. Combine that with the slug-in-molasses speed of the OS on the machine and it's just a lose-lose situation.
This new mouse looks great!

I'm forced to use Windows at work. It takes forever to boot up, and just as long to shut down. You have to run an array of security software, consuming lots of processing power, just to keep it from getting infected with nasty spyware, adware and viruses. Once a year or so you need to rebuild the whole system because of OS rot that gradually slows it down. What an antiquated, clunky and cluttered piece of **** OS.

Next version, I hear, is an OS X clone. Thank god!
Old 3rd August 2005
  #6
I'm sorry. It's my fault for starting this. I shouldn't have even mentioned by client's machine. It is certainly not representative of all Macs, I'm sure.

Just as the Windoze machine at your work is not probably representative of all Windows machines.

My own machine, a Dell Pentium M laptop boots in approximately 30 seconds most days and has a load profile at bootup of 110 to 112 MB.

With regard to OS efficiency -- what's your load profile like? Can you load OS X into less than 128 MB? I don't think so. And, though it's not a problem for single users in most applications, the fabled Mach kernel at the core of OS X is a highly efficient microkernal architecture -- trapped inside the "old-fashioned" monolithic architecture of the open source Darwin layer. The upshot of that is that calls to the Mach kernel must queue up for serial access instead of multiple simultaneous communications that the Mach kernel was designed to support.

How elegant is that? Not too. And, when loads get heavy, as in attempts to use OS X Server in heavy use network serving, OS X bogs way down -- delivering performance as much as ten times slower than other Unix/Linux variants running apps like MySQL or Apache (in head to head OS comparisons on the same Apple hardware with loads reaching 50 simulated users.)


Anyhow, compared to my client's 1.4 gHz iMac G5, my lowly Dell seems like a rocket ship. Compared to his wife's 800 mHz G4 Powerbook (with a 7200 RPM TravelStar drive, no less) which is about the same vintage as my machine but cost 1/3 more than mine would have cost if I hadn't bought it refurbished) mine seems like a flying saucer with interstellar overdrive engaged. (Okay. That just sounds stupid. It's a lot faster. Trust me.)


But compared to a, say, 2.4 gHz PowerMac tower, I have no doubt (or at least I'd really like to think) that my little laptop would seem like a toy.

Diffferent strokes, man. Different needs. Different budgets. Different preferences. Different strokes.


Like I said, my fault for bringing it up.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #7
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M.S.P.'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1
I flippin' hate that no button mouse.

Agreed. Those mice are horrible.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #8
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max cooper's Avatar
 

The Microsoft Intellimouse v4.0 works great with Tiger; I use one of those Griffin jog wheels along with the mouse. Gives me loads of ways to control stuff. Also, you can set up the mouse buttons to work differently in each application. I'm sure most multi-button meese do the same.

I'm interested in trying this thing, though.

If only I could stop myself from using these gosh durn macs. I must be wacked!
Old 3rd August 2005
  #9
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pulsar modular's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1

With regard to OS efficiency -- what's your load profile like? Can you load OS X into less than 128 MB? I don't think so. And, though it's not a problem for single users in most applications, the fabled Mach kernel at the core of OS X is a highly efficient microkernal architecture -- trapped inside the "old-fashioned" monolithic architecture of the open source Darwin layer. The upshot of that is that calls to the Mach kernel must queue up for serial access instead of multiple simultaneous communications that the Mach kernel was designed to support.

How elegant is that? Not too. And, when loads get heavy, as in attempts to use OS X Server in heavy use network serving, OS X bogs way down -- delivering performance as much as ten times slower than other Unix/Linux variants running apps like MySQL or Apache (in head to head OS comparisons on the same Apple hardware with loads reaching 50 simulated users.)
I too apologize for hijacking the thread with mac/pc arguments, but today I find it difficult to resist.. heh

Anyway, the efficiency you talk about is little more than geeky spec talk that means absolutely nothing in the context of workstations and DAWs, even if it were true (let me just note that OS X runs massively clustered supercomputers). I'm talking about the whole experience as an end user. Leaving the subjective UI experience aside, under OS X you never run as a superuser (aka administrator), applications (or parts of them) are not installed in OS areas, and there is no brain-dead registry to maintain. Windows Vista will address some of these issues, but only partially. OS X is here today and it is not plagued by these security and stability issues. Because Apple has so much more control over hardware, you don't need to get involved to such an extent to keep your system up to date. Even your keyboard eprom can be reflashed via a simple "Apple->Software Update". It all comes down to a much smoother end user experience.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #10
heh No prob, pendejo. (Last time I said that I almost got smacked upside my silly, pasty white face. heh ) Like I said, I was out of place bringing the whole thing up.

I completely understand your point of preferring the Mac OS. I'd never try to talk someone who did into switching. (All else being equal. Or even halfway close to equal.)


Anyhow, with regards to the rest, I had a long detailed post here, complete with graphics and supporting links -- and then I looked at it and thought -- geez, this is a thread about the new Mac mouse.

Somehow a detailed investigation of the Mach 3 microkernal and the Darwin layer looked little, shall we say, impertinent, and more than a little, shall we say, tweaked.

So I moved it all to the link immediately below, if anyone wants to read about it. (Honest, it's really interesting, particularly if you're interested in OS issues and performance.)

http://www.bluetrip.com/images/bb_im...postMoved.html

[And here's the section of the article in question that deals with the Mac OS X architecture issues and how it works out in performance comparisons with Linux: http://www.anandtech.com/mac/showdoc.aspx?i=2436&p=8 ]


And, ultimately, Pendejo, they determine that OS X on a G5 makes a very poor server for the OS architecture reasons cited above -- but, with Altivec or the velocity engine, makes a very good workstation. So, there ya go... heh
Old 3rd August 2005
  #11
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Synth80s's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by pendejo
This new mouse looks great!

I'm forced to use Windows at work. It takes forever to boot up, and just as long to shut down. You have to run an array of security software, consuming lots of processing power, just to keep it from getting infected with nasty spyware, adware and viruses. Once a year or so you need to rebuild the whole system because of OS rot that gradually slows it down. What an antiquated, clunky and cluttered piece of **** OS.

Next version, I hear, is an OS X clone. Thank god!
Ahhh...Mac vs. PC. Opinions, I can take, but straight misinformation, I can't.

Without disparaging the Mac (not my point or intention), I have to speak up here to state that this user's experience should not be your reality *IF* you know what you're doing and/or you have a decent IT support team at your disposal. I acknowledge that many people don't have this luxury, but computers aren't toys -- they do take some skill to operate and maintain because the fluid nature of *all* software requires constant updates.

While prior versions of Windows required more care and feeding and a lot more security configuration out of the box, Windows XP SP2 (the current release in manufacture) comes out of the box with the Windows firewall enabled and it pesters you to setup Automatic Updates for patch management. These two items alone will save 95% of people 95% of the time.

Again, their past behavior in the security realm leaves a lot to be desired, but over the past 2 years, Microsoft has done an exemplary job identifying and responding to security issues. Patches are released the second Tuesday of every month and they seem to be very well tested these days and more critical patches are sometimes released mid-cycle. MS' documentation is clear and easily accessible.

The lastest version of Windows Update (and WSUS, the free utility for system administrators) updates the OS, Intenet Explorer, Windows Media Player, DirectX, the Office suite, IIS, SQL and Exchange all from one cntral GUI. And, of course, it can easily be automated.

A few more notes:

1) Working in Windows does not require a user to be logged on as an administrator for 95% of day to day functions, though most software installs and many system configurations unsurprisingly do require admin credentials.

2) The registry does not require maintenance. Period. Most bloated registries have to do with poorly written package installers/installers. MS can't control a 3rd party vendor if their uninstaller leaves behind droppings in the registry and in its program directory. It's an unfortunate consequqnce of being the most popular platform (hence "lowest common denominator" development)

3) Local Security Policy and Internet Explorer Zones can do wonders to keep anything from leaking through the browser. A properly patched machine and a decently-educated use (i.e. one that doesn't click "yes" to every dialog box they see) won't get spyware.

4) Anti-virus software is important (and takes minimal system resources), but common sense is even more important. If a user logs in as an admin, opens an e-mail from an unknown sender that contains a .vbs script or batch script, who is really to blame? FWIW, Outlook blocks almost every form of potential malicious executable imaginable.

5) Windows systems do not require regular rebuilds if people don't muck them up with poorly written software. Again, if a user installs a ****load of poorly-written freeware that runs tons of services and which can't be easily uninstalled because of the poor uninstall script, is Windows to blame or the user?

6) Windows XP does not have stability issues. Period. Don't buy a crappy PC or build a half-ass clone, run it poorly (or worse, overclock it) and blame the OS. Apple has the benefit of owning the HW and SW side of the equation, and that comes at a cost. If you buy a good machine (mid-range or better Dell) and don't muck it up, XP will run for a long time without stability issues.

MS made it too difficult for too long to run a Windows system without issues (lots of configs required out of the box), but this is no longer the case. Windows XP SP2 and Windows 2003 Server SP1 are excellent operating systems -- stable, secure and easy to administer if you know what you're doing. I'm in charge of a large number of critical systems at work, many of which (until recently) were run on the public internet without any security issues. And, believe you me, people are trying all day every day.

The problem is simply that MS erred on the "ease of use" side of the equation for too long, and the internet age of always-on cable and DSL home users bit them on the ass. And, of course, owning 95% of the OS market makes you the default target for all things malicious. Nobody writes viruses with the intent of havig minimal impact -- you have to go for the throat if you want carnage.

Things have changed, MS has adjusted their priorities and the results are plain to see. Still, it will always take a requisite degree of knowledge to properly maintain any OS. Books can be read, knowledge base articles downloaded. Even the help files in Windows XP have been heavily rewritten -- they are very thorough and useful, but how many people ever bother to consult them?

Few people purchase a car with the idea that it will never require service from a trained professional -- so it is with a computer. If you're not skilled enough to maintain the system, make sure you put aside a little $$$ for some form of support.

One more note: a good rule of thumb for any computer running any OS is not too mix too many functions. Don't use the same computer to act as a public web server, database development server, DAW, MP3 shareware client, video game machine and porn surfing tool. Different functions call for different configurations. A well-configured server does not have browser flaws because you don't use it to surf for cracked warez and a DAW may not do much else because you disable a lot of services to attain raw speed. My Windows XP DAW machine is ridiculously rock solid stable. Why? Because it only acts as a DAW and nothing else.

Again, respect the rules of common sense computing and you will reap huge benefits. The truth is out there if you're resourceful enough to look!

-Synth80s
Old 3rd August 2005
  #12
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KBOY's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pendejo
This new mouse looks great!

I'm forced to use Windows at work. It takes forever to boot up, and just as long to shut down. You have to run an array of security software, consuming lots of processing power, just to keep it from getting infected with nasty spyware, adware and viruses. Once a year or so you need to rebuild the whole system because of OS rot that gradually slows it down. What an antiquated, clunky and cluttered piece of **** OS.

Next version, I hear, is an OS X clone. Thank god!
Sorry, kind of hi jacking here. I just never get this..... I have been running pc's for about 13 years now and in the past 6 years have had maybe one infection. I run a hardware firewall through via router and I don't use Internet explorer, I use Netscape with pop up blockers on. I have never had Norton or Black ice or any other protection software installed.

My friends mac G4 is a freaking mess. He's a freaking mess. I chalk so many of the problems people have up to user error or stupidity.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #13
Mindreader
 
BevvyB's Avatar
 

You know, I think I may never post in the music computers section again
Old 3rd August 2005
  #14
You know, I've got another mea culpa... I'd somehow missed the fact the new mouse has a scroll-ball on top. I must have misread that. So my comments about "What's wrong with a plain ol' scroll wheel?" were somewhat misdirected, as I'd looked at the diagrams on Apple's site and somehow got the impression that you had to scroll with mouse gestures. That said, having used a no button mouse with my client's machine, I still don't like that aspect. But, hey, who really cares. It's just a mouse. The more the merrier.
Old 3rd August 2005
  #15
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Henchman's Avatar
Oh my god. Stop the presses.
Apple has agin released somethign completely revolutionary and new.

A multiple button mouse.

Holy ****!!!!

How did they ever think this one up.

Genius. Pure Genius.
Old 4th August 2005
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
Dickens's Avatar
 

I'm fairly new to Gearslutz. Would someone kindly explain why any mention of an Apple product raises such sarcasm and resentment from PC users?
Old 4th August 2005
  #17
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Synth80s's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickens
I'm fairly new to Gearslutz. Would someone kindly explain why any mention of an Apple product raises such sarcasm and resentment from PC users?
I can't speak for everyone here, but I think the sarcasm is a reaction to the perceived arrogance of Apple and some (not all) of its users. Steve Jobs, master marketer that he is, usually presents new Apple products as "revolutionary" when sometimes they are not. Some Apple users (not all) also give off the impression that no sane, logical or intelligent person would use a PC. They think that PC users must be brainwashed sheep -- there can be no other reason.

Indeed, my wife and I chuckled when we were at Good Guys last weekend and we saw an Apple display with a MacMini, big white LCD monitor and stylish (but horrible sounding speakers). The associated Apple literature said something to the effect of "The Intelligent User's Computer." The obvious implication is that Apple makes products for the intelligent, the elite -- only the unwashed masses buy Dells and HPs! It's subtle, but it's been going on for years.

Specifically, I think the last poster is taking a jab at the fact that Apple is announcing an Apple product that has long been available from 3rd party vendors for almost every platform (Apple included). Though the rest of the world has acknowledged that trackballs, multi-button and scrolling mice are useful tools for many, Apple considers it news when they release an Apple-branded product that is long overdue.

Unfortunately, people wrap themselves up too much in their choice of brand -- marketing works better than most would like to admit. Many (not all) Apple users (not unlike die-hard Ford or Chevy owners) identify closely with the Apple brand and try to make it out to be a lifestyle choice rather than a computing product.

Also unfortunate: many people require constant affirmation that they purchased the right computer/car/toaster oven because they're not really sure. This leads to inevitable carping and the spread of misinformation about each platform. In the end, they're all just computers, and they shouldn't mean more to us than that! I've always said that if there was one perfect computer (or car or toaster oven or religion, for that matter) for eveyone, everyone would buy it. It doesn't exist and it never will, but far too many people get wrapped up trying to convince everyone else that what's best for them should be best for everyone.

-Synth80s (who still has his first computer, an Apple ][e, uses Windows, Linux and Macs)
Old 4th August 2005
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickens
I'm fairly new to Gearslutz. Would someone kindly explain why any mention of an Apple product raises such sarcasm and resentment from PC users?
When I was a kid I used to get beat up by a gang of Mac users after school every day...

... oh, no, wait. That was the glee club, come to think of it.



Seriously -- this is all my fault. Before I reared my big, round, ugly head in here, no one was talking about anything but the new Mac mouse.

Mea culpa! Mega mea culpa.
Old 5th August 2005
  #19
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pounce's Avatar
 

geez, what the **** is up with this thread? it's about a mouse. and people say mac users are deluded and defensive???????????

what i really want to know is if it's ergonomic or not, and how well the function it has are supported in apps like Logic or DP, as i'd happily get one if it made using those apps easier in any way. maybe we can get this thread back to a discussion about the mighty mouse, or which mouse one might use that is helpful in DAW applications.
Old 5th August 2005
  #20
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pulsar modular's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth80s
Ahhh...Mac vs. PC. Opinions, I can take, but straight misinformation, I can't.
-Synth80s
You don't like misinformation? Then don't write long postings full of it.
Old 5th August 2005
  #21
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entropy's Avatar
mmmm, Apple thread and hey presto, in pops Henchman. Get over it, some of us like our overly expensive Macs!!!!

What I'd like to know is why didn't they release a bluetooth version as well? It does look very funky though and I might just have to pick one up this weekend. I'll report back once I've tested it in Halo land.
Old 5th August 2005
  #22
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Synth80s's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by pendejo
You don't like misinformation? Then don't write long postings full of it.
You're kidding, right?

I went out of my way to offer educated, helpful information about a platform that I use regularly and know very well from many years of working in the trenches in IT and from having worked with DAWs since the 486 days, and your reply is "that's misinformation."

Just so I know, my expert friend, which part was misinformation? Which part wasn't true? Which part have you tried and know to be false?

If you just want to be negative and confrontational, at least be honest about it, but don't call the bluff of people who know what the **** they're talking about simply because you don't like what you read.

The truth hurts.

-Synth80s
Old 5th August 2005
  #23
Gear Addict
 
Lorddiagram's Avatar
 

the mouse

Does the mouse use "touch pad" like tech?

It looks like the scroll whell is a trackball and the "squeeze" feature can be customized?
Old 5th August 2005
  #24
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pulsar modular's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth80s
You're kidding, right?

I went out of my way to offer educated, helpful information about a platform that I use regularly and know very well from many years of working in the trenches in IT and from having worked with DAWs since the 486 days, and your reply is "that's misinformation."

Just so I know, my expert friend, which part was misinformation? Which part wasn't true? Which part have you tried and know to be false?

If you just want to be negative and confrontational, at least be honest about it, but don't call the bluff of people who know what the **** they're talking about simply because you don't like what you read.

The truth hurts.

-Synth80s
To be honest, I'm usually too lazy and easily bored to respond to long winded posts like that with another long winded post, but okay..

"Working in Windows does not require a user to be logged on as an administrator for 95% of day to day functions"

Not if you're a data entry drone and all you do is use the approved and pre-installed corporate applications. As soon as you try to go beyond that however, you're out of luck. Note that the next version of Windows will use the exact same approach as we have in Mac OS X: "Windows Vista User Account Protection bridges the gap between user and administrative privileges by allowing you to run applications under a standard user account. When you need to perform an administrative task, such as install software or drivers, Windows Vista prompts you to confirm your intentions or to provide your credentials." Windows XP cannot do this.

"The registry does not require maintenance. Period."

Windows applications must write to the registry in order to do a lot of things, such as registering application (COM) objects, manage preferences, make file associations etc. It's the responsibility of each application to write and remove these records. The problem is that a lot of applications don't do this cleanly. Over time obsolete records get left behind in the registry, and this has an impact on your startup time. Window must still parse and try to make sense out of all that left-over garbage. Microsoft has of course realized what a wonderfully stupid idea this was so they are trying to move away from it. .NET applications use self-contained assemblies, similar to Max OS X bundles and Java jar files. The registry will not disappear any time soon, but sometime in the far away future when it actually does, you'll be able to install most applications on Windows just as you do on Mac OS X: by dragging-and-dropping the (single) application file into your local application folder. Imagine that.

"Windows XP does not have stability issues."

Oh yes it does. "DLL hell" is still there even if it's diminished in newer software products. Applications updating shared dynamic link libraries with incompatible versions can destabilize your system.

Someone here wrote that he's been running Windows for years without any sort of protection. Well, download and run AdAware and I guarantee you it will find some surprises hiding in your system and it won't just be cookies.

You can't handle Apple marketing? Sure, a lot of it is a bunch of bull**** but when was marketing ever factual? It's widely recognized as one of their strengths.

I could go on but I'll stop here. Let me just conclude by saying that my main issue with Microsoft is that, with one exception (developer tools), they never really invented anything new. It's all regurgitated mediocre products that were adopted, modified, and that eventually built market share through sheer persistence, business tactics, and monopolistic practices. Windows was originally a poor Mac OS clone, the Office product were all clones of various products (WordStar, Lotus 1-2-3, etc), Direct3D is an OpenGL clone, .NET a Java clone, Vista clear a Mac OS X clone (search, security, photomanagement, windows and buttons look and feel), and on and on... The pinnacle of Microsoft innovation is what? Microsoft Bob? Something actually new.. Apple, for all their faults, once in a blue moon they actually create something new and surprising.

Mac OS X is not without problems but it's clearly a generation ahead of Windows XP.
Old 6th August 2005
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
Dickens's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth80s
I can't speak for everyone here, but I think the sarcasm is a reaction to the perceived arrogance of Apple and some (not all) of its users. Steve Jobs, master marketer that he is, usually presents new Apple products as "revolutionary" when sometimes they are not. Some Apple users (not all) also give off the impression that no sane, logical or intelligent person would use a PC. They think that PC users must be brainwashed sheep -- there can be no other reason.

Indeed, my wife and I chuckled when we were at Good Guys last weekend and we saw an Apple display with a MacMini, big white LCD monitor and stylish (but horrible sounding speakers). The associated Apple literature said something to the effect of "The Intelligent User's Computer." The obvious implication is that Apple makes products for the intelligent, the elite -- only the unwashed masses buy Dells and HPs! It's subtle, but it's been going on for years.

Specifically, I think the last poster is taking a jab at the fact that Apple is announcing an Apple product that has long been available from 3rd party vendors for almost every platform (Apple included). Though the rest of the world has acknowledged that trackballs, multi-button and scrolling mice are useful tools for many, Apple considers it news when they release an Apple-branded product that is long overdue.

Unfortunately, people wrap themselves up too much in their choice of brand -- marketing works better than most would like to admit. Many (not all) Apple users (not unlike die-hard Ford or Chevy owners) identify closely with the Apple brand and try to make it out to be a lifestyle choice rather than a computing product.

Also unfortunate: many people require constant affirmation that they purchased the right computer/car/toaster oven because they're not really sure. This leads to inevitable carping and the spread of misinformation about each platform. In the end, they're all just computers, and they shouldn't mean more to us than that! I've always said that if there was one perfect computer (or car or toaster oven or religion, for that matter) for eveyone, everyone would buy it. It doesn't exist and it never will, but far too many people get wrapped up trying to convince everyone else that what's best for them should be best for everyone.

-Synth80s (who still has his first computer, an Apple ][e, uses Windows, Linux and Macs)
My initial impression when looking into a computer purchase was that Apple was the underdog.
I rarely (if ever) see Mac users jump in anger or resentment at announcements concerning new PC products. Personally, I'm not in awe of this new mouse...mighty or otherwise...but certainly don't feel the need to berate a company or it's users for the release of a product. Too many other issues.
Seems pretty simple. If you don't like it, don't buy it.
Old 6th August 2005
  #26
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Henchman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by pendejo
Mac OS X is not without problems but it's clearly a generation ahead of Windows XP.
As if.
Old 6th August 2005
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
Dickens's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth80s
Unfortunately, people wrap themselves up too much in their choice of brand -- marketing works better than most would like to admit. Many (not all) Apple users (not unlike die-hard Ford or Chevy owners) identify closely with the Apple brand and try to make it out to be a lifestyle choice rather than a computing product.
I can clearly see this is not exclusive to Apple users.
Old 6th August 2005
  #28
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pounce's Avatar
 

yeah, i kinda wonder if mac users are supposed to go **** all over the vista thread now??

it's a thread about a damn mouse. this stuff is predictable bull****. and the same posters are always hopping on it.

i still haven't read anything about how well this thing works with a daw, or how many other daw features are easier to get to with this mouse. although those labeled qwerty keyboards with all the logic shortcuts look cool. that keyboard and a mighty mouse could be cool. anyway, i'd like to hear more about that in this thread.
Old 6th August 2005
  #29
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Synth80s's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickens
My initial impression when looking into a computer purchase was that Apple was the underdog.
I rarely (if ever) see Mac users jump in anger or resentment at announcements concerning new PC products. Personally, I'm not in awe of this new mouse...mighty or otherwise...but certainly don't feel the need to berate a company or it's users for the release of a product. Too many other issues.
Seems pretty simple. If you don't like it, don't buy it.
Well, don't shoot the messenger! I was just asking your question as to why someone might have that reaction. I didn't attack the product or the platform, I just offered some insight as to what I sense "out there."

Also, if you don't think there's anti-PC hostility toward Microsoft or other PC-related vendors, you need to check out the CNET forums and others. The recent announcement of Windows Vista, an early beta release product that almost nobody has seen or used, was met with enormous hostility. Many proclaimed "it'll never be as good as OS X" but how would anyone know at this point?

I have nothing against Apple -- I often recommend that people purchase Macs if I think the platform best suits their needs. What makes me chuckle are statements like, "Meet the mouse that reinvented the wheel" (from the Apple web site) and Apple's overuse of the word "revolutionary" in almost every product release. Search the Apple.com site for the word "revolutionary" and you'll find that all of the following products and more were deemed revolutionary at release:

Mac G4 Cube (great design, but abandoned for lack of sales)
SuperDrive (CD-RW/DVD-R combo drive developed by Pioneer)
SoundTrack Pro (technology derived from purchase of emagic Logic platform)
G5 (draw your own conclusions)

-Synth80s
Old 6th August 2005
  #30
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Synth80s's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickens
I can clearly see this is not exclusive to Apple users.
I completely agree. Personally, I go out of my way to steer clear of heavily branded products because brand really doesn't mean anything anymore once you get past the hype. It's difficult to find nice casual clothes that aren't slathered in branding (i.e. free advertising).

Q: what's the difference between an expensive Louis Vuitton handbag and a "fake" that's made in the same overseas factory in an off-hours production run? A: not much!

In today's world of "extreme outsourcing," anyone who buys a product based on brand name alone without investigating what makes the most sense for their $$$ is selling themselves short. In particular, I think it's funny how people who wouldn't buy a given product with one name on it would definitely buy another which is substatially the same, but with a different branded badge. Think GM...

-Synth80s
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