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overclocking, who does it?
Old 13th September 2007
  #31
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Andrew Kinsey's Avatar
 

The reason why most people dont overclock there computers is to do with warranty issues with the computer manufacturers, and as already stated, those companies would rather sell you a more powerfull system that costs more.

Also most people don't know much about overclocking so quite rightly they dont mess with that side of things in fear of making a mistake, this is wise especially if the computer is being used in a professional environment.

But with the right computer hardware and technician who knows what there doing, i see no reason why an overclocked system should cause any stability issues.

Old 13th September 2007
  #32
Lives for gear
 

Tibbon,
you keep missing the major point.

if taking a lower speed processor and running it at the speed of the highest SOLD by that company.
then you are only doing what the company itself does. ITS ALL THE SAME SILICON.

you may have validity in your argument only AFTER one goes above the speed of the highest cpu sold.

on the other hand Intel does not play its full hand (unless behind in the speed wars)

EG: the 3.0G to 3.6G i mentioned is one of the chips i am offering.

Intel does not make a 3.6G Core 2 duo. (YET)
but it IS on thier road map.

their silicon is good enough today to sell it, they dont as they are waiting until AMD releases their Phenom processor and then come came back with a smack down to counter AMD.

now i would argee with you in regards to Extreme overclocking.
where the potential for transitor bleed (this happens with stock speeds already)
is drastically increased due to higher than stock voltages.
as well as increased heat.

the overclocking i do is all at stock voltage and well within Intels spec for heat.

Scott
Old 13th September 2007
  #33
Lives for gear
 

As I seem to recall stating in my first reply, my 2.0 GHz Athlon 64 X2 3800+ is completely stable at 2.5 GHz at less than stock voltage (1.28V on a 1.35V rated CPU). A computer which is not stable is not worth using. Thus, I make sure that my overclocked systems are perfectly stable before doing any serious work.

There are many reasons why you don't see a lot of factory overclocked systems. Reliability is not the first that comes to mind. NASA still uses 1970s technology for many mission critical applications. Does anyone want to fire up a PDP-11 for a DAW?

Often many factors other than reliability are involved in such choices. Rather, I would imagine that other concerns like corporate consistency, warranties, agreements with manufacturers, etc... are a better explanation. Another issue is that proper overclocking requires specialized knowledge and that detailed performance tweaking and testing can be time consuming. The attention required on a per-system basis is probably not very cost effective in a corporate environment where you are more likely to see a "set it and forget it" philosophy across multiple machines. In that sort of environment, it probably makes more sense to set every machine at BIOS defaults.
Old 18th October 2013
  #34
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Mo Facta's Avatar
Necropost!

Found this page while doing research on overclocking my new "old" machine that I just got for my home studio; an XFX nForce 780i SLI-based Q6600 system. I've overclocked it to 3.2GHz and it seems to be slamming along just fine. Core temps at idle are between 38 and 43ish.

My main studio machine is an i7-2600 that is not overclocked. It doesn't leave me wanting as far as DSP headroom goes. It's interesting to see how the increase in processing power over the last six years has basically made overclocking less popular, although I'm sure the gamers still do it.

Reading over the posts it's funny to see how precious people were over this issue. I personally have never over-clocked a studio machine before and pretty much thought along the same lines as Tibbons for many years but when I got this machine I thought, eh, what the hell. If I can squeeze another gigahertz or so out of each core safely, let's do it. The upside was that the 780i motherboard is a gaming motherboard with an Nvidia chipset so it's sorta made for overclocking. So far it's working great.

Anyhoo. No real reason for my post here but to comment.

Actually, anyone out there overclocking their new Ivy Bridge or Haswell system? Would be interesting to see what the current consensus is. I'm sure I know the verdict.

Cheers
Old 18th October 2013
  #35
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barryfell's Avatar
I'm forever hitting CPU max when my projects get busy with resource hungry plugins so overclocking to add another 1Ghz on my 3.2Ghz i2500k with a simple CPU multiplier change was a free no-brainer.

Is there ever such a thing as having too much CPU power? (Unless you aren't using much software)

I'd say overclocking is more relevant today that it ever was for studio computers.

Plugins like u-He Diva can have huge CPU overheads.
Old 21st October 2013
  #36
Gear Addict
 
Mo Facta's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by barryfell View Post
I'm forever hitting CPU max when my projects get busy with resource hungry plugins so overclocking to add another 1Ghz on my 3.2Ghz i2500k with a simple CPU multiplier change was a free no-brainer.

Is there ever such a thing as having too much CPU power? (Unless you aren't using much software)

I'd say overclocking is more relevant today that it ever was for studio computers.

Plugins like u-He Diva can have huge CPU overheads.
Interesting take. Maybe I'm just not as liberal with plugins but I rarely go beyond 50% on my i7-2600/8GB system with projects with 60+ tracks. I do have two UAD cards, though so that takes some pressure off.

I must say, though, my Q6600 Core 2 Quad system at home is killing it right now at 3.2Ghz. I used an 8x multiplier with a FSB of 400 (1600) and base voltage of 1.3v. I've also upped the ram to 6GB so it's in top form. I unlinked the RAM to run at 800MHz (it's got DDR2 DIMMs) so my next endeavour will be to see if I can overclock it to about 1000 or so MHz.

Cheers
Old 21st October 2013
  #37
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echoRausch's Avatar
 

Moderate OC here. i7 3770K permanently @4.2gHz. Good cooling required.
Old 21st October 2013
  #38
Overclocking in a studio environment is asking for trouble...your system will get very unstable...on my experience.
Old 22nd October 2013
  #39
Gear Nut
 
rtownsend's Avatar
 

It's been a long time since I did it, but there's a way to just overclock the CPU (not the memory, not the PCI bus, not the graphics card). That was the way that was recommended a few years ago (for a DAW). If I recall correctly, that is... I used memtest86+ to load down the machine, and RealTemp to inspect temperatures. Other software may be recommended for these tasks now. Running like a champ for several years. Only one hardware failure - hard drive.

Sorry, I used Prime95 for stress testing the CPU (along with RealTemp), not memtest86+.

Last edited by rtownsend; 22nd October 2013 at 08:18 PM.. Reason: Used Prime95 for stress testing
Old 22nd October 2013
  #40
Lives for gear
I7 3930k... overclocked to 4.3ghz

Sent from my SGH-T999
Old 22nd October 2013
  #41
Gear Maniac
 

AMD came out with an 8 core 5GHz processor a couple months ago, sold with a water cooling kit!

Sent from my ADR6400L
Old 22nd October 2013
  #42
Are you over clocking guys buying a cheep mic, and then tweak it to up the quality? Are you using a cheap AD/DA and use plug in's to shape the sound?
I'm sure not! (hope so..)
If you guys have the extra "Time" to spend on "learning" the trade of overclocking and the time to get it to run stable, then you must not be a busy money making studio. Your daw is probably 90% hobby and 10% business. So go ahead and over clock.

But all others who are doing it for a 100% living income (sure, it's a hobby as well), those studios don't have the "Time" for over clocking, and those studios will buy a $7000 Xeon monster to have peace of mind that the main DAW tool is rock solid, and if there should be any issues, it's covered.

My HD NATIVE DAW is 2x 8 core Xeons 3.1ghz, 64G ram. It's an investment well worth for years to come. And I chose water cooling, so the Xeon's will stay cool sustaining its life.

All commercial OME's can't sell a low end Cpu over clocked, cus it will require more expensive cooling, and If the end user will have to pay more, they will choose to buy a better cpu! Nobody likes to pay top dollar and look in device manager and find a low end cpu...

Bottom line:
Over clocked cpu's CAN be 100% reliable and stable. But it comes with a price tag: Higher end mother boards and ram with high end cooling = more money AND time...

Most Buisnes studios don't have all of the above... So we stay with stock.
Are we all clear?
Cheers :-)
Old 22nd October 2013
  #43
Gear Addict
 
Mo Facta's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by YKlein View Post
Are you over clocking guys buying a cheep mic, and then tweak it to up the quality? Are you using a cheap AD/DA and use plug in's to shape the sound?
I'm sure not! (hope so..)
If you guys have the extra "Time" to spend on "learning" the trade of overclocking and the time to get it to run stable, then you must not be a busy money making studio. Your daw is probably 90% hobby and 10% business. So go ahead and over clock.

But all others who are doing it for a 100% living income (sure, it's a hobby as well), those studios don't have the "Time" for over clocking, and those studios will buy a $7000 Xeon monster to have peace of mind that the main DAW tool is rock solid, and if there should be any issues, it's covered.

My HD NATIVE DAW is 2x 8 core Xeons 3.1ghz, 64G ram. It's an investment well worth for years to come. And I chose water cooling, so the Xeon's will stay cool sustaining its life.

All commercial OME's can't sell a low end Cpu over clocked, cus it will require more expensive cooling, and If the end user will have to pay more, they will choose to buy a better cpu! Nobody likes to pay top dollar and look in device manager and find a low end cpu...

Bottom line:
Over clocked cpu's CAN be 100% reliable and stable. But it comes with a price tag: Higher end mother boards and ram with high end cooling = more money AND time...

Most Buisnes studios don't have all of the above... So we stay with stock.
Are we all clear?
Cheers :-)
<DELETED BY MODERATOR> Read the rest of this thread. The jury is out on this one and apparently has been since 2009 and beyond. Some people have good results with overclocking and some don't. You admitted it yourself but I have a problem with you taking the high horse on this "real pros" not having the "time" business. Let it go, man.

I posted in this thread because I bought an older Q6600 quad core machine off of a gamer for my home setup that is built for overclocking (nForce 780i chipset). It's got a monster cooling system so I thought, hey, if I can squeeze another gigahertz or so out of it, what the hell? I've also pretty much stayed away from overclocking in my career and if you read the rest of the thread since I resurrected it you'll see that my main i7-2600 3.4GHz studio machine is not overclocked and I prefer to keep it that way. This topic for me started off as an experiment that now seems to be working out. I'm getting idle temps of 36 or so degrees going up to 50ish under load. No instability, nothing.

I'm also in the middle of a massive editing project for our national defense force involving 576 files and many tracks including lots of restoration processing. The processor didn't even blink and is running smooth and cool.

I think that overclocking is one of those things that has a stigma in the minds of purists. I admit I've been in that mindframe before but clearly if you know what you're doing, i.e. know how to manage cooling, voltages and clock settings, you can push a lot of stock processors.

But hey, don't get me wrong, I'm not a tweak head or anything. It's just a fun prospect to be able to get more out of what you paid for. I mean, I bought this old quad core machine for $250, complete. For my home setup, it's great.

Cheers
Old 22nd October 2013
  #44
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by YKlein View Post
Are you over clocking guys buying a cheep mic, and then tweak it to up the quality? Are you using a cheap AD/DA and use plug in's to shape the sound?
I'm sure not! (hope so..)
If you guys have the extra "Time" to spend on "learning" the trade of overclocking and the time to get it to run stable, then you must not be a busy money making studio. Your daw is probably 90% hobby and 10% business. So go ahead and over clock.

But all others who are doing it for a 100% living income (sure, it's a hobby as well), those studios don't have the "Time" for over clocking, and those studios will buy a $7000 Xeon monster to have peace of mind that the main DAW tool is rock solid, and if there should be any issues, it's covered.

My HD NATIVE DAW is 2x 8 core Xeons 3.1ghz, 64G ram. It's an investment well worth for years to come. And I chose water cooling, so the Xeon's will stay cool sustaining its life.

All commercial OME's can't sell a low end Cpu over clocked, cus it will require more expensive cooling, and If the end user will have to pay more, they will choose to buy a better cpu! Nobody likes to pay top dollar and look in device manager and find a low end cpu...

Bottom line:
Over clocked cpu's CAN be 100% reliable and stable. But it comes with a price tag: Higher end mother boards and ram with high end cooling = more money AND time...

Most Buisnes studios don't have all of the above... So we stay with stock.
Are we all clear?
Cheers :-)
What a load of condescending rubbish. I'm 100% full time professional and I run an overclocked i7. Took maybe half a day to research and carry out the overclock, having never done it before and it runs perfectly.
Old 22nd October 2013
  #45
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The dman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by YKlein View Post
Are you over clocking guys buying a cheep mic, and then tweak it to up the quality? Are you using a cheap AD/DA and use plug in's to shape the sound?
I'm sure not! (hope so..)
If you guys have the extra "Time" to spend on "learning" the trade of overclocking and the time to get it to run stable, then you must not be a busy money making studio. Your daw is probably 90% hobby and 10% business. So go ahead and over clock.

But all others who are doing it for a 100% living income (sure, it's a hobby as well), those studios don't have the "Time" for over clocking, and those studios will buy a $7000 Xeon monster to have peace of mind that the main DAW tool is rock solid, and if there should be any issues, it's covered.

My HD NATIVE DAW is 2x 8 core Xeons 3.1ghz, 64G ram. It's an investment well worth for years to come. And I chose water cooling, so the Xeon's will stay cool sustaining its life.

All commercial OME's can't sell a low end Cpu over clocked, cus it will require more expensive cooling, and If the end user will have to pay more, they will choose to buy a better cpu! Nobody likes to pay top dollar and look in device manager and find a low end cpu...

Bottom line:
Over clocked cpu's CAN be 100% reliable and stable. But it comes with a price tag: Higher end mother boards and ram with high end cooling = more money AND time...

Most Buisnes studios don't have all of the above... So we stay with stock.
Are we all clear?
Cheers :-)
Thanks for the lecture dad but you obviously have no clue how easy it is to OC these days.
Old 22nd October 2013
  #46
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by YKlein View Post
Are you over clocking guys buying a cheep mic, and then tweak it to up the quality? Are you using a cheap AD/DA and use plug in's to shape the sound?
I'm sure not! (hope so..)
If you guys have the extra "Time" to spend on "learning" the trade of overclocking and the time to get it to run stable, then you must not be a busy money making studio. Your daw is probably 90% hobby and 10% business. So go ahead and over clock.

But all others who are doing it for a 100% living income (sure, it's a hobby as well), those studios don't have the "Time" for over clocking, and those studios will buy a $7000 Xeon monster to have peace of mind that the main DAW tool is rock solid, and if there should be any issues, it's covered.

My HD NATIVE DAW is 2x 8 core Xeons 3.1ghz, 64G ram. It's an investment well worth for years to come. And I chose water cooling, so the Xeon's will stay cool sustaining its life.

All commercial OME's can't sell a low end Cpu over clocked, cus it will require more expensive cooling, and If the end user will have to pay more, they will choose to buy a better cpu! Nobody likes to pay top dollar and look in device manager and find a low end cpu...

Bottom line:
Over clocked cpu's CAN be 100% reliable and stable. But it comes with a price tag: Higher end mother boards and ram with high end cooling = more money AND time...

Most Buisnes studios don't have all of the above... So we stay with stock.
Are we all clear?
Cheers :-)
You literally have no idea what you're talking about when it comes to overclocking.

Literally.

1. It's pretty easy to do in the BIOS. Doesn't require many changes, provided you take a couple hours to figure out what's what, just so your brain is comfortable with it.

2. Overclocking and "low-end" computers are not related. The purpose of overclocking isn't just to squeeze juice out of inferior parts (like it used to be). These new CPUs are literally begging to be overclocked. So much so... Intel has plans that practically dare you to push it.

3. A nice 30% overclock is so easy.. and so noticeable.. that you're an idiot to not consider it. Even a basic 20% overclock if you're a wuss. This is with just a basic good aftermarket air cooler or water cooling kit.

Nobody is taking time out in their studios to build a custom case, with all types of highend fans and advanced liquid nitrogen custom cooling setups to get their overclocks. This is really basic stuff. Just change a few things in the BIOS, maybe set a voltage based on easily accessible advice, monitor your tempurature, tadaa.
Old 22nd October 2013
  #47
I gauss your all right and I'm wrong.
Last time I over clocked was 6 years ago. I'm tech savvy and it took so long to get it right, and was still not Enough to run a good reverb plug.
Old 22nd October 2013
  #48
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamil21 View Post
Overclocking in a studio environment is asking for trouble...your system will get very unstable...on my experience.
lack of ability (knowhow) does not make your statement true

I have literally thousands (over the yrs) of overclocked systems in pro environments.

Scott
ADK
Old 22nd October 2013
  #49
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by YKlein View Post
I gauss your all right and I'm wrong.
Last time I over clocked was 6 years ago. I'm tech savvy and it took so long to get it right, and was still not Enough to run a good reverb plug.
Times have changed my friend

Sent from my SGH-T999
Old 23rd October 2013
  #50
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kaboom75's Avatar
I got my 2.6Ghz Intel i7 in 2009 since then it's been running overclocked at 3.4 - 3.6 Ghz If I didn't overclock I would have trouble running ACE and DIVA with Soundtoys and slate plugs on top.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #51
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Quantum7's Avatar
Hey guys, I've thought about overclocking for the last year, but also thought I may do harm to my DAW. It's nice to know that it is safer in this day and age. Can someone recommend a good website for instructions on how to do so?

Thanks!
Old 23rd October 2013
  #52
Gear Addict
 
Mo Facta's Avatar
Can a mod please explain why my reply to an inciting post got censored?

Thank you.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #53
Gear Addict
 
Mo Facta's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quantum7 View Post
Hey guys, I've thought about overclocking for the last year, but also thought I may do harm to my DAW. It's nice to know that it is safer in this day and age. Can someone recommend a good website for instructions on how to do so?

Thanks!
Search google for your specific motherboard on overclocking forums. Some (read most) non-gaming motherboards don't have options for adjusting the FSB frequency, multipliers, etc. There are some apps out there, however, that can bypass the limitation and adjust these setting directly from Windows:

Best overclocking software: 15 top apps | News | TechRadar

SetFSB seems to be one of the most popular but you need to know what PLL your motherboard uses. Cooling is a big issue so make sure you have a beefy aftermarket cooler. My situation was easy because my motherboard is an XFX 780i with an nForce chipset that is designed for this sort of thing.

Good luck!

Cheers
Old 23rd October 2013
  #54
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barryfell's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamil21 View Post
Overclocking in a studio environment is asking for trouble...your system will get very unstable...on my experience.
Only if you overclock your system to a degree that makes it unstable.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #55
Gear Addict
 
Mo Facta's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPhoenix View Post
These new CPUs are literally begging to be overclocked. So much so... Intel has plans that practically dare you to push it.
Yup, Intel itself even has their own overclocking app:

Intel Desktop Control Center

This whole argument is like the old 16-bit, maximizing your input level to get "more bits". It's advice from a bygone era. Times have changed.

Cheers
Old 23rd October 2013
  #56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcschild View Post
lack of ability (knowhow) does not make your statement true

I have literally thousands (over the yrs) of overclocked systems in pro environments.

Scott
ADK
It Depends on how you overclock it as you are saying.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #57
Gear Head
 

I overclock some systems, but I have to disagree with some posters who make it seem like it's a piece of cake.
There's a difference between overclocking and what I call proper overclocking, which is perfectly stable among other things. Proper overclocking takes time, especially if you're still learning or if you want to do a moderately fine-tuned overclock (and not just have, say, 0.2V more than necessary) or do heavier overclocking.

But we're all still learning, really. New CPUs/motherboards require some different approaches, stress testing needs to be done with specific settings to be effective (Prime95 at the default 'blend' is not good enough, you have to use 'large FFT') etc.
And even if your OC is stable overall, some things might behave differently. For example, some systems won't resume from sleep when OC'd.

Overclocking is now easier than it used to be, with lots of resources. But I won't just recommend it to anyone. Be prepared to invest a lot of time if you want to do it right.
Old 23rd October 2013
  #58
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norbury brook's Avatar
 

or buy a pre overclocked system from a reputable builder like i did from Scan in the UK.

they then take out any hit or miss discrepancies with the CPU's/BIOS settings as they're guaranteed.



MC
Old 23rd October 2013
  #59
Gear Maniac
 

When I first got it I modestly overclocked my i7-920 from 2.7Ghz to 3.6GHz.

It was an interesting project and helped my learn about the capabilities of my tools. It was relatively easy and I never had any stability issues. Seemed a no brainer.

It did run hot though. So occasionally the fans would spin up at inconvenient moments. So during one project I turned off the o/c. I was amazed how little real world difference it made to performance. So I've left it off ever since.

After that I decided to build an audio only system in a rack case. Using all low power components and no fans, no moving parts. Totally silent. 2.7GHz Pentium T series (35W $50). After all I could always install something more expensive or use the old i7 (now the office box) if heavy lifting was required.

Hasn't happened so far! Not saying I'm scoring multiple full length movies or using 500 simultaneous compressors or anything but I'm still surprised how much I get done on such a supposedly low powered system.

p.s. I said 'no fans'. I do have fans, obviously, but they are temperature controlled and don't start to come on until any vital readings exceed delta T + 60. Which they don't. Even in high summer.
Old 29th October 2013
  #60
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echoRausch's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by YKlein View Post
And I chose water cooling, so the Xeon's will stay cool sustaining its life.
Uhhhh... No problem with watercooling here (have it on my own) but did you ever consider the fact that watercooling systems come to an age in a much more critical way than air cooling systems?

Your "investment" can easily turn to dust in a case of watercooling failure.

OCing a system doesn't take you days. Even "professionals" will find time therefore. But of course, you're not forced to do so. But watercooling for standard clocked systems are just silly.

There are many people modifying their mics or preamps or tube compressors. If someone has the knowledge to do so this is a major advantage. Real big studios have their own staff therefore.

And for every "professional" out there is one basic rule: know your gear. So know your computer - at least a bit.
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