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Do you connect your music production PC/Laptop to the internet?
Old 23rd January 2020
  #31
I have to, for software updates and licensing/registration. However, it's not the main computer I use to go online.
Old 24th January 2020
  #32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikael B View Post
Why are you asking about the blatantly obvious? Don't you understand what a botnet is? What do you think a bot without a net does? Well, hopefully it doesn't do much. That would be the difference anyway. No net! Why? Because the machine isn't on the net. That's a guarantee for many things, but not a cure for all ailments.
Sure. But at some point you’re probably going to connect a computer to the net briefly to achieve something that can’t be done offline. At which point....?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikael B View Post
Oh, so you're saying all the music sites are ultrasafe, just not Avast? I guess no music site could have linked to them either. Do we have to lay out how linking works? Cross-site script hijacking? Ever heard of this? What about middle-of-the-man attacks? You know what that is? Do you know in how many different places in the source code of a music site you don't even know about that could be injected? A large number of music sites have very lax security, btw. They run on ancient software that is easy to hack. You really don't have a clue, do you? At least I know I can't know what I don't know.

Easy now. I’m certainly no expert and never have claimed to be!

At the same time I have run music computers online for the last 15 years with zero issues.

As I stated from the off, I’m exclusively Mac...but then I was “schooled” how that means nothing...

I’m not denying you’re probably right about what *could* happen.

At the same time, anecdotally I’ve never heard of anyone suffering from one of these supposed attacks.

It’s a bit like driving a car. In theory it’s very dangerous, people die doing it (or being near it), and we all should be a lot more careful than we actually are. In fact we’d be safest if we inconvenienced ourself and never left our own homes.

In practice, the vast majority of us make it through life taking that risk.

It’s very similar here - IF you’re not dumb and don’t click on anything you’re not 100% sure of, or even better don’t use email/general web use on your music computer at all, have a proper firewall set up etc - you’re incredibly unlikely to have an issue, unless you’re very unlucky. After all - that’s the way the systems are set up to work.

I’m not denying your ultimately superior knowledge on any of this, only that in practice, it’s a very small risk.

You’d need to point to multiple examples of the Avast thing, with music companies (Waves, ilok, maybe steinberg or someone getting infected) to have a valid case to prove otherwise.

Much like not taking a car ever, I’d find my life hugely inconvenienced by not having my music computers online...
Old 24th January 2020
  #33
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Sure. But at some point you’re probably going to connect a computer to the net briefly to achieve something that can’t be done offline. At which point....?
There's likely a connection being made, but a botnet relies on infected machines staying on-line. That's probably obvious, just making it clear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Easy now. I’m certainly no expert and never have claimed to be!


I’m not denying you’re probably right about what *could* happen.

At the same time, anecdotally I’ve never heard of anyone suffering from one of these supposed attacks.

I’m not denying your ultimately superior knowledge on any of this, only that in practice, it’s a very small risk.
Well, that didn't stop you from giving general public advice about an area of which you know even less than what you think, did it?

I certainly don't have any superior knowledge, but might have read an article or two outlining how hacking works these days and the truth is few of us would know if we were hacked, because neither the objectives nor the tools, nor the actors are those of yesteryears.

If we choose to stay on-line we can only assume we're handling the risks involved responsibly and that our steps of prevention actually work. It's just a good thing to make that decision without naive assumptions of what those risks are. Especially if the machine in question is a money maker that also other people rely on.

I've assumed those risks myself when I've out of lack of alternatives to be on the net have stayed connected also with my music machine*. But I think that my next desktop machine won't have a connection, nor will there be anything on it not involving music. If nothing else, there will be less distractions. Music on-line I can listen to via my phone.

*A friend of mine used to boot from another disk when he went on-the net. He was conscious of the potential risks already 10+ years ago.
Old 24th January 2020
  #34
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikael B View Post
Why are you asking about the blatantly obvious?
Yet somehow it flew over your head. Or you're just dodging the obvious answer: one can get just as easily infected without being connected to the net by downloading and installing from the net elsewhere and copying later, as in the case of the Avast example. In other words, being disconnected from the net is hardly a guarantee of safety.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikael B View Post
Oh, so you're saying all the music sites are ultrasafe, just not Avast? I guess no music site could have linked to them either. Do we have to lay out how linking works? Cross-site script hijacking? Ever heard of this? What about middle-of-the-man attacks? You know what that is? Do you know in how many different places in the source code of a music site you don't even know about that could be injected? A large number of music sites have very lax security, btw. They run on ancient software that is easy to hack. You really don't have a clue, do you?
What an obnoxious reply. I'm confident I don't speak for just myself when I say I'm not impressed by your attempt to dazzle us with your alleged superior tech knowledge. Maybe it partly has to do with working in I.T. and knowing that realistically, cracking most music sites isn't half as easy as you make it out to be (e.g. Sweetwater, Thomann, and the like...mom n pop ones may be more vulnerable). If it were, we'd be reading about a lot more successful hacks. You realize many of them have I.T. people, if not entire depts, who place a premium on information security, right?

PS again you missed what psycho_monkey said and was right in front of you, i.e.:
Quote:
I’m not suggesting everything is safe,
His overall point, I think, is if you exercise some common sense - don't open suspicious emails, visit questionable sites, scan downloads, etc - you should be fine, even connected to the net.

Quote:
At least I know I can't know what I don't know.
Why are you stating the blatantly obvious?

Exiting this thread, it's digressing quickly.
Old 24th January 2020
  #35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikael B View Post
There's likely a connection being made, but a botnet relies on infected machines staying on-line. That's probably obvious, just making it clear.



Well, that didn't stop you from giving general public advice about an area of which you know even less than what you think, did it?

I certainly don't have any superior knowledge, but might have read an article or two outlining how hacking works these days and the truth is few of us would know if we were hacked, because neither the objectives nor the tools, nor the actors are those of yesteryears.

If we choose to stay on-line we can only assume we're handling the risks involved responsibly and that our steps of prevention actually work. It's just a good thing to make that decision without naive assumptions of what those risks are. Especially if the machine in question is a money maker that also other people rely on.

I've assumed those risks myself when I've out of lack of alternatives to be on the net have stayed connected also with my music machine*. But I think that my next desktop machine won't have a connection, nor will there be anything on it not involving music. If nothing else, there will be less distractions. Music on-line I can listen to via my phone.

*A friend of mine used to boot from another disk when he went on-the net. He was conscious of the potential risks already 10+ years ago.
Nope, if you reread what I wrote I’m stating exactly what I know and don’t know!

I’m really only offering advice from experience, not in depth knowledge. I’ve got a LOT more experience running music computer rigs than most - at one point I looked after 15+ systems for the studio complex I worked at, all were online, and never had any issues. In 15+ years of doing this myself, I never had an issue with my studio rigs. I had to de-virus a couple of general PCs, but not because they’d downloaded dodgy software masquerading as studio packages.

I’ll just repeat what I said - IF you stick to reputable sites for downloads, authorisations etc, IF you avoid using the machine for general emails and web browsing, and IF you avoid clicking on dodgy emails - the chances of a problem are very low.

Of course you could get unlucky, someone hacks Soundtoys or whoever and your next download results in ransomware or something - but it’s unlikely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
Yet somehow it flew over your head. Or you're just dodging the obvious answer: one can get just as easily infected without being connected to the net by downloading and installing from the net elsewhere and copying later, as in the case of the Avast example. In other words, being disconnected from the net is hardly a guarantee of safety.


What an obnoxious reply. I'm confident I don't speak for just myself when I say I'm not impressed by your attempt to dazzle us with your alleged superior tech knowledge. Maybe it partly has to do with working in I.T. and knowing that realistically, cracking most music sites isn't half as easy as you make it out to be (e.g. Sweetwater, Thomann, and the like...mom n pop ones may be more vulnerable). If it were, we'd be reading about a lot more successful hacks. You realize many of them have I.T. people, if not entire depts, who place a premium on information security, right?

PS again you missed what psycho_monkey said and was right in front of you, i.e.: His overall point, I think, is if you exercise some common sense - don't open suspicious emails, visit questionable sites, scan downloads, etc - you should be fine, even connected to the net.

Why are you stating the blatantly obvious?

Exiting this thread, it's digressing quickly.
That’s about the size of it!
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