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Slate trigger 2
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Slate trigger 2

hey, i know there might be an issue calling a snare by it's name but many companies skirt it by using a weird spelling so when you use something like a delay, a binson..they might call it a binsonette but ya get the idea .. alllusions to etc.. wtf is snare 1 ..2..3..4..5???? ..to me that's some lazy azz crap that wastes my time having to suss thru stuff during a session..yes ..the Slate locked perfect with no tweaking but come on man!!!!..

lol i have great disdain for drum replacement but i had to do it on a vamp of a ballad that had brushes but need a warm snare on the 1/4's on the end build..then i had go thru snare 1 2 3 4 5 ect ect....where is the PRIDE???? im flummoxed

i named my studio Mike Tarsia Recording ..1 because wally heider told my dad they can't write the check wrong/my name is my bizz... 2 my motto is "the QUALITY goes in before my name goes on"
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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Brian M. Boykin's Avatar
I broke down a couple weeks ago and bought this program. I have not used it yet. I’m under the assumption I’m gonna be able to make my own samples. With your connections you should be able to get a sample of any snare recorded in a perfect room. I’m hoping to build my own library with my snares and borrowed snares from my drummer friends. I know this doesn’t help in the immediate or on the session your in the middle of, but for the future.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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Blaine Misner's Avatar
 

so your problem is the naming convention?
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Yes the naming it's a PIA..I should hav an idea..like piccolo , snare size ..material at least..if not just a tweaked snare name
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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BM Grabber's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
Yes the naming it's a PIA..I should hav an idea..like piccolo , snare size ..material at least..if not just a tweaked snare name
The naming is not good. I agree...

But after some research a while back, I made this note to myself:

The drum samples that are broken into micing options:

Z1 = Close mic and overhead combined.
Z3 = Just close mic'd.
NRG = Ambient mics from NRG room.
SSDR = Ambient mics from SSD Room.


TRIGGER comes stock with a library of the industry standard STEVEN SLATE 4 drum samples. These samples were recorded to 2 inch analog tape, and were processed with the finest analog gear in order to sound polished and ready for the mix with little to no need for extra processing. The STEVEN SLATE library has several types of TRIGGER instruments.

Z1 - The Z1 mono samples are the most commonly used default sample. They have just the right amount of overhead micing combined with close micing, which gives them a three dimensional, full, and punchy sound. The Z1s have air, depth, dimensionality, and impact making them a great all around place to start when using the STEVEN SLATE DRUMS.

Z2 - The Z2 mono snare samples are similar to the Z1 snare samples, however they have been further processed with a smooth compression to lessen the attack and enhance the decay. This will make them “sit” very well in a mix with even less need for further processing.

Z3 - The Z3 samples are only printed with the very closest mics. They are very dry and do not have air but are processed to retain the punch of the Z1. Common uses for the Z3 are when mixing in with real drums, or to use for ultra dry drum mixes in certain music genres such as heavy metal.

SSDR - The SSDR samples are stereo, real room ambient mic’d samples, recorded in a large concrete warehouse. They are processed heavily with compression, EQ, and even modulation. When mixed in with the Z1 samples, the mixer can adjust the amount of stereo room sound in the drum mix. Listening to the SSDR samples soloed may sound strange, but combining them with their corresponding Z1 samples in a mix should present the listener with a very rich, deep, and natural sound.

NRG - The NRG samples are a set of ambient mics from the famous NRG Recording Studio A room. This room is big and open sounding with great depth and detail. The NRG samples are completely unprocessed allowing the user to compress, EQ, or leave them untouched.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The samples are categorised into several groups. With up to 127 velocity layers per hit, the Z1 mono samples combine overhead and close miking, but if you prefer something a little more processed, the Z2 mono snare samples have some dynamic compression to make them easier to place in a mix, while the Z3 samples were recorded with close mics only.
SSDR are stereo samples with ambient room mics plus a little creative post-processing, which can sometimes be quite obvious. However, these samples are designed to layer well with the Z1 mono samples.
The NRG samples were recorded in a large room at the NRG North Hollywood Recording Studio, using room mics, and so are pretty ambient. These have no further processing.

Most samples can be mixed, other than the Z1 and Z3 categories, in which phasing issues are likely. The designers recommend choosing either Z1 or Z3 samples and then blending these with the NRG or SSDR room samples. You can also mix multiple Z1 samples or multiple Z3 samples.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Hope this helps a bit
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Brian M. Boykin's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BM Grabber View Post
The naming is not good. I agree...

But after some research a while back, I made this note to myself:

The drum samples that are broken into micing options:

Z1 = Close mic and overhead combined.
Z3 = Just close mic'd.
NRG = Ambient mics from NRG room.
SSDR = Ambient mics from SSD Room.


TRIGGER comes stock with a library of the industry standard STEVEN SLATE 4 drum samples. These samples were recorded to 2 inch analog tape, and were processed with the finest analog gear in order to sound polished and ready for the mix with little to no need for extra processing. The STEVEN SLATE library has several types of TRIGGER instruments.

Z1 - The Z1 mono samples are the most commonly used default sample. They have just the right amount of overhead micing combined with close micing, which gives them a three dimensional, full, and punchy sound. The Z1s have air, depth, dimensionality, and impact making them a great all around place to start when using the STEVEN SLATE DRUMS.

Z2 - The Z2 mono snare samples are similar to the Z1 snare samples, however they have been further processed with a smooth compression to lessen the attack and enhance the decay. This will make them “sit” very well in a mix with even less need for further processing.

Z3 - The Z3 samples are only printed with the very closest mics. They are very dry and do not have air but are processed to retain the punch of the Z1. Common uses for the Z3 are when mixing in with real drums, or to use for ultra dry drum mixes in certain music genres such as heavy metal.

SSDR - The SSDR samples are stereo, real room ambient mic’d samples, recorded in a large concrete warehouse. They are processed heavily with compression, EQ, and even modulation. When mixed in with the Z1 samples, the mixer can adjust the amount of stereo room sound in the drum mix. Listening to the SSDR samples soloed may sound strange, but combining them with their corresponding Z1 samples in a mix should present the listener with a very rich, deep, and natural sound.

NRG - The NRG samples are a set of ambient mics from the famous NRG Recording Studio A room. This room is big and open sounding with great depth and detail. The NRG samples are completely unprocessed allowing the user to compress, EQ, or leave them untouched.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The samples are categorised into several groups. With up to 127 velocity layers per hit, the Z1 mono samples combine overhead and close miking, but if you prefer something a little more processed, the Z2 mono snare samples have some dynamic compression to make them easier to place in a mix, while the Z3 samples were recorded with close mics only.
SSDR are stereo samples with ambient room mics plus a little creative post-processing, which can sometimes be quite obvious. However, these samples are designed to layer well with the Z1 mono samples.
The NRG samples were recorded in a large room at the NRG North Hollywood Recording Studio, using room mics, and so are pretty ambient. These have no further processing.

Most samples can be mixed, other than the Z1 and Z3 categories, in which phasing issues are likely. The designers recommend choosing either Z1 or Z3 samples and then blending these with the NRG or SSDR room samples. You can also mix multiple Z1 samples or multiple Z3 samples.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Hope this helps a bit
This is super helpful. Thank you.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by BM Grabber View Post
The naming is not good. I agree...

But after some research a while back, I made this note to myself:

The drum samples that are broken into micing options:

Z1 = Close mic and overhead combined.
Z3 = Just close mic'd.
NRG = Ambient mics from NRG room.
SSDR = Ambient mics from SSD Room.


TRIGGER comes stock with a library of the industry standard STEVEN SLATE 4 drum samples. These samples were recorded to 2 inch analog tape, and were processed with the finest analog gear in order to sound polished and ready for the mix with little to no need for extra processing. The STEVEN SLATE library has several types of TRIGGER instruments.

Z1 - The Z1 mono samples are the most commonly used default sample. They have just the right amount of overhead micing combined with close micing, which gives them a three dimensional, full, and punchy sound. The Z1s have air, depth, dimensionality, and impact making them a great all around place to start when using the STEVEN SLATE DRUMS.

Z2 - The Z2 mono snare samples are similar to the Z1 snare samples, however they have been further processed with a smooth compression to lessen the attack and enhance the decay. This will make them “sit” very well in a mix with even less need for further processing.

Z3 - The Z3 samples are only printed with the very closest mics. They are very dry and do not have air but are processed to retain the punch of the Z1. Common uses for the Z3 are when mixing in with real drums, or to use for ultra dry drum mixes in certain music genres such as heavy metal.

SSDR - The SSDR samples are stereo, real room ambient mic’d samples, recorded in a large concrete warehouse. They are processed heavily with compression, EQ, and even modulation. When mixed in with the Z1 samples, the mixer can adjust the amount of stereo room sound in the drum mix. Listening to the SSDR samples soloed may sound strange, but combining them with their corresponding Z1 samples in a mix should present the listener with a very rich, deep, and natural sound.

NRG - The NRG samples are a set of ambient mics from the famous NRG Recording Studio A room. This room is big and open sounding with great depth and detail. The NRG samples are completely unprocessed allowing the user to compress, EQ, or leave them untouched.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The samples are categorised into several groups. With up to 127 velocity layers per hit, the Z1 mono samples combine overhead and close miking, but if you prefer something a little more processed, the Z2 mono snare samples have some dynamic compression to make them easier to place in a mix, while the Z3 samples were recorded with close mics only.
SSDR are stereo samples with ambient room mics plus a little creative post-processing, which can sometimes be quite obvious. However, these samples are designed to layer well with the Z1 mono samples.
The NRG samples were recorded in a large room at the NRG North Hollywood Recording Studio, using room mics, and so are pretty ambient. These have no further processing.

Most samples can be mixed, other than the Z1 and Z3 categories, in which phasing issues are likely. The designers recommend choosing either Z1 or Z3 samples and then blending these with the NRG or SSDR room samples. You can also mix multiple Z1 samples or multiple Z3 samples.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Hope this helps a bit
even though im not a fan of the "stereo drum thing" it is cool that each hit is multi sampled ..i'd just like some logical nomenclature that's all..i just feel like slate **** starts out great but they bag on the "finishing" tweaks that make something great[my raven]..hope they take note
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Lives for gear
 
BM Grabber's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian M. Boykin View Post
This is super helpful. Thank you.
I honestly don't know where I found this... But there is obviously some copy, cut, paste, and editing involved
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