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How Come there are 5 VST folders?
Old 3rd April 2017
  #1
How Come there are 5 VST folders?

Hey Gang!

I'm new to Windows (Windows 10 pro 64bit) and I started installing plugins and realized they are being installed in different locations. Studio One doesn't recognize where some of them are because the default location is set to- drive C/program/VST. I know I can add locations to the directory in S1 but I would like to reinstall everything from scratch. Which VST folder would you install all the plugins to? I want them all to be in one VST folder.

There is a VST folder in the C drive
VST folder in the program folder
Vst folder in the Program x86 folder
a Steinberg VST folder as well.

LOL!

Talk about freedom of choice. On a mac they all go to the same vst folder.

Thanks!
Old 3rd April 2017
  #2
Gear Addict
 
Lackatee's Avatar
There's a registry setting for VST plugins in Windows and you generally want to set it before you start installing plugs. Also good to make your own folders for them. I just make folders on the C drive like this

C:\VST\
C:\VST64\

32 bit plugs go in the VST folder and 64 bit go into VST64 and then obviously a sub folder for each company like for example C:\VST\Waves, C:\VST\Fabfilter.. etc

Open regedit

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>Software - Highlight the Software folder and right click New -> Key
Type VST - Highlight that VST Folder - Right click - New - String Value - Type VstPluginsPath - hit enter - Right click again and Modify it and put in the location the VST folder you created. Keep in mind this is only the setting for the 64 bit plugins. We have to do the same exact process for 32 bit plugs but inside the Wow6432Node folder a couple down from the VST entry we just made. You right click that folder and start the process all over again and then you're good to go. Most installers should recognize the path and auto set the install to the proper VST folder but you just have to check them. Some of them don't.



Anyway, good luck!
Old 3rd April 2017
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lackatee View Post
There's a registry setting for VST plugins in Windows and you generally want to set it before you start installing plugs. Also good to make your own folders for them. I just make folders on the C drive like this

C:\VST\
C:\VST64\

32 bit plugs go in the VST folder and 64 bit go into VST64 and then obviously a sub folder for each company like for example C:\VST\Waves, C:\VST\Fabfilter.. etc

Open regedit

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>Software - Highlight the Software folder and right click New -> Key
Type VST - Highlight that VST Folder - Right click - New - String Value - Type VstPluginsPath - hit enter - Right click again and Modify it and put in the location the VST folder you created. Keep in mind this is only the setting for the 64 bit plugins. We have to do the same exact process for 32 bit plugs but inside the Wow6432Node folder a couple down from the VST entry we just made. You right click that folder and start the process all over again and then you're good to go. Most installers should recognize the path and auto set the install to the proper VST folder but you just have to check them. Some of them don't.



Anyway, good luck!
This is a pretty good idea, and I've done something similar (though with different folder names).

The problem is, many plug-ins don't look to the Registry to see what you've set the path to; they just go with what the developer thinks it should be. (This is assuming the installer doesn't ask where you want the plug-in to go, and some don't.) So don't be surprised if half of the plug-ins you install don't go where you want.

Just get used to looking into the "default" folders (the ones that are already on your system) and moving whatever's there into the folders you create. And keep in mind that you can move VST3 plug-ins, too.

Another tip: Within each plug-in folder you can create sub-folders for the actual plug-ins. So you can keep Waves plug-ins together, Arturia's plug-ins together, etc. Once you have more than a dozen plug-ins, you'll see the value in having a folder for each one. And again, you can move the plug-in into its own folder even after you've installed it (98% of the time).

All that said, if you're using Cubase, forget it. I still haven't figured out why it does what it does with plug-in locations.

Steve
Old 3rd April 2017
  #4
Gear Maniac
I do some of that was mentioned above.

In one DAW (Reaper?) I just point to
C:\Program Files
C:\Program Files (x86)
and it worked

I name them
VST32
VSt64

I used to put the VST folder in the developers name
such as Native Instruments, Izotope etc. but sometimes
this is ignored by the DAW. Perhaps I should return to
this practice so at least I know what is going on.

I am still a bit confused about VST3 location.

the other problem is a few DAW's only give you one location to
point to for the VST's. The DAW may not like C:\Program Files
and C:\Program Files (x86). Now what?
Old 3rd April 2017
  #5
Lives for gear
 
rhythmtech's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by V Gardiakos View Post

the other problem is a few DAW's only give you one location to
point to for the VST's. The DAW may not like C:\Program Files
and C:\Program Files (x86). Now what?
Reaper, Sonar, Cubase & Studio 1 wil allow you to choose multiple folders by putting a semi-colon ( ; ) between locations (and i highly suspect the rest do too).

The only one that doesnt is protools, where your rtas/aax folders are tied to location by the install.
Old 3rd April 2017
  #6
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmtech View Post
Reaper, Sonar, Cubase & Studio 1 wil allow you to choose multiple folders by putting a semi-colon ( ; ) between locations (and i highly suspect the rest do too).

The only one that doesnt is protools, where your rtas/aax folders are tied to location by the install.
Bidule only allows one VST location. I have come across this before but cannot recall which VST host. Gotta say most VST hosts allow multiple locations.

I will have to look what I did in Bidlue this last time. Before I had a folder that I copied all the dll's. But then no I have duplicate dll's in the C:\Program Files
and C:\Program Files (x86) which created a problem if I recall correctly.

So who else uses
C:\Program Files
C:\Program Files (x86)
as a single VST pointer and let the VST host to sort it out?
Old 4th April 2017
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by V Gardiakos View Post
I do some of that was mentioned above.

In one DAW (Reaper?) I just point to
C:\Program Files
C:\Program Files (x86)
and it worked

I name them
VST32
VSt64

I used to put the VST folder in the developers name
such as Native Instruments, Izotope etc. but sometimes
this is ignored by the DAW. Perhaps I should return to
this practice so at least I know what is going on.

I am still a bit confused about VST3 location.

the other problem is a few DAW's only give you one location to
point to for the VST's. The DAW may not like C:\Program Files
and C:\Program Files (x86). Now what?
What are you confused about the VST3 location?

I haven't found a DAW that doesn't like the "defaults" suggested by Steinberg, or what it finds in the Windows Registry (if it looks for them). And I've installed 5 or 6 different DAWs on my system (and others).

Steve
Old 5th April 2017
  #8
I'm in front of my pc and I'm at a loss only because I'm new to this world. I have defected fro 18 years of mac use.

LOL



Quote:
Originally Posted by Lackatee View Post
There's a registry setting for VST plugins in Windows and you generally want to set it before you start installing plugs. Also good to make your own folders for them. I just make folders on the C drive like this

C:\VST\
C:\VST64\

32 bit plugs go in the VST folder and 64 bit go into VST64 and then obviously a sub folder for each company like for example C:\VST\Waves, C:\VST\Fabfilter.. etc

Open regedit

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>Software - Highlight the Software folder and right click New -> Key
Type VST - Highlight that VST Folder - Right click - New - String Value - Type VstPluginsPath - hit enter - Right click again and Modify it and put in the location the VST folder you created. Keep in mind this is only the setting for the 64 bit plugins. We have to do the same exact process for 32 bit plugs but inside the Wow6432Node folder a couple down from the VST entry we just made. You right click that folder and start the process all over again and then you're good to go. Most installers should recognize the path and auto set the install to the proper VST folder but you just have to check them. Some of them don't.



Anyway, good luck!
Old 5th April 2017
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nu-tra View Post
I'm in front of my pc and I'm at a loss only because I'm new to this world. I have defected fro 18 years of mac use.

LOL
Welcome to the world of Windows. You'll get this sorted out in no time.


Just make a folder wherever you want, call it something that makes sense to you and move your already-installed VSTs into that folder.

Here's what mine looks like, but others here have also suggested valid configurations:

(Ignore the "bACKUP" folder.)

As you can see, each developer's VST is in its own folder, and the EFFECT VSTs are also in their own sub-folder, again, stored in the developer's folder. This works for me, though you can obviously adapt it to work for you.

Since some VSTs work with multiple DAWs, I also sort the VSTs that come with DAWs based upon each DAW, so I know that if I un-install a DAW, certain VSTs will go with it.

Steve
Attached Thumbnails
How Come there are 5 VST folders?-clipboard01.jpg  
Old 5th April 2017
  #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
Welcome to the world of Windows. You'll get this sorted out in no time.


Just make a folder wherever you want, call it something that makes sense to you and move your already-installed VSTs into that folder.
I just did this a few days back, and I still haven't recovered from the mess it made.

I had Reaper locking up and freaking out about missing windows files that were part of their dependency.
Old 5th April 2017
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by xmission View Post
I just did this a few days back, and I still haven't recovered from the mess it made.

I had Reaper locking up and freaking out about missing windows files that were part of their dependency.
I'm not sure what Reaper was upset about, but VSTs have no "dependencies".

You don't want to move the .EXE file or anything else associated with the VST other than the actual VST file. There are no "dependencies", in almost all cases.

Some VST installations have other files, yes. Those will be stored in the "Program Files (x86)" (for 32-bit apps) or "Program Files" folders. Do not move those. But wherever they dump the actual VST file (which they almost always ask during install), that's the file you can move. After that, just have Reaper (or whichever DAW you're using) scan for VSTs again. It will update itself on the new locations.

Steve
Old 5th April 2017
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
I'm not sure what Reaper was upset about, but VSTs have no "dependencies".

You don't want to move the .EXE file or anything else associated with the VST other than the actual VST file. There are no "dependencies", in almost all cases.

Some VST installations have other files, yes. Those will be stored in the "Program Files (x86)" (for 32-bit apps) or "Program Files" folders. Do not move those. But wherever they dump the actual VST file (which they almost always ask during install), that's the file you can move. After that, just have Reaper (or whichever DAW you're using) scan for VSTs again. It will update itself on the new locations.

Steve
That's bizarre. I took the contents of a VST folder, and dumped it into another.

I'm not sure what I screwed up, but now reaper locks up while scanning my izotope vsts. I just uninstalled them all, cleaned up any leftover files and folders that I could find, and reinstalled, but no joy.

I'm sure it will move on and lock up other vsts when I get past these...


Edit:
just found this:

http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=187107
Old 5th April 2017
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by xmission View Post
That's bizarre. I took the contents of a VST folder, and dumped it into another.

I'm not sure what I screwed up, but now reaper locks up while scanning my izotope vsts. I just uninstalled them all, cleaned up any leftover files and folders that I could find, and reinstalled, but no joy.

I'm sure it will move on and lock up other vsts when I get past these...


Edit:
just found this:

Freeze while scanning for plugins - Cockos Incorporated Forums
It appears that Reaper has problems with iZotope plug-ins, and pretty much all of them, all the time, if you move them.

That might have something to do with iZotope's quirky authorization system, which allows you to store the authorization in the Registry or in a file on your hard drive.

Can you just put the iZotope ones back (or leave them where they are in the first place) and put the rest of them where you'd like them? Waves is similar in this regard, and that's one that I don't bother moving. (But since it's one .DLL or .VST3 file, it's not that big a deal, either.)

I haven't moved iZotope VSTs in a couple of years; I've simply installed them in my custom VST folder in the first place. For all I know, iZotope does this with every DAW. But again, there are no "dependencies", and I'll bet you this is either unique to Reaper and/or related to iZotope's screwy authorization system. (It's not supposed to store where you put the file, only that you're allowed to use it. So I'm not sure what it could be doing.)

I know the person on the link you sent me can't seem to resolve his issue, but have you tried un-installing your iZotope stuff with RevoUninstaller (free version) and then cleaned your Registry with CCleaner (free version)? Then, if you re-install iZotope where you want it (or, to be safe, wherever it defaults), I'll bet you a nickle it'll work again. Revo is much more thorough in removing files, and CCleaner will remove the remaining Registry entries. (Just don't reboot until you've had Revo completely remove everything.)

Sorry to hear about your problems with Reaper. I know I've moved VSTs in Sonar, Bitwig, Cubase, FL Studio and others. They all have quirks, but other than Pro Tools, I haven't seen one that limits where you can put VSTs.

Steve
Old 5th April 2017
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
It appears that Reaper has problems with iZotope plug-ins, and pretty much all of them, all the time, if you move them.

That might have something to do with iZotope's quirky authorization system, which allows you to store the authorization in the Registry or in a file on your hard drive.

I know the person on the link you sent me can't seem to resolve his issue, but have you tried un-installing your iZotope stuff with RevoUninstaller (free version) and then cleaned your Registry with CCleaner (free version)? Then, if you re-install iZotope where you want it (or, to be safe, wherever it defaults), I'll bet you a nickle it'll work again. Revo is much more thorough in removing files, and CCleaner will remove the remaining Registry entries. (Just don't reboot until you've had Revo completely remove everything.)

Sorry to hear about your problems with Reaper. I know I've moved VSTs in Sonar, Bitwig, Cubase, FL Studio and others. They all have quirks, but other than Pro Tools, I haven't seen one that limits where you can put VSTs.

Steve
Thanks very much for the help. I will try what you suggest if the below doesn't get me through it.

One of the responses in that thread showed how to edit the .ini file to pull out the fails. I've been forcing reaper closed each time it locks, editing out the fails from the .ini, and scanning again, and it looks like in a half hour or so of an install method that has never been included in any installation manual ever, I may wind up with them installed.

Fortunately, Reaper is just kind of a way for me to set up projects that I send to a buddy to work on. I use protools for the most part, but that's another story...

Thanks again.
Old 5th April 2017
  #15
I'm just installing everything into the same folder

Drive C/ program/ vst/

The. I make a folder for each company.

The only thing I want to know is where my vst3 is goi g. I only see one .dll file per plugin

Thanks everyone! This is really helpful
Old 5th April 2017
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nu-tra View Post
I'm just installing everything into the same folder

Drive C/ program/ vst/

The. I make a folder for each company.

The only thing I want to know is where my vst3 is goi g. I only see one .dll file per plugin

Thanks everyone! This is really helpful
Well, VST3 files are usually in (get this!) \Program Files\Common Files\VST3 (on 64-bit systems).

Why there, under the "Common Files" folder, when there's no corresponding "VST2" folder there? Who the hell knows.

Still, the VST3 files (which have a .VST3 extension) can be moved. Look for the .VST3 files in that VST3 folder, and put them wherever you want. (If you want to stay on the safe side, don't move your iZotope or Waves .VST3 files.)

Again, I still recommend further sorting them based upon developer, and also putting all the EFFECT VSTs into an "Effects" folder, with the developer folders in there, too. This will make your life MUCH easier when it comes time to troubleshoot issues with the VSTs or to remove ones you no longer want.

By the way, did you create a "Program" folder just for your VST folder, or was that a typo above?

You'll also want to keep your 32-bit and 64-bit VST files separate, in separate folders. If, for some reason, you decide to install both versions (or if you don't get an option and you're forced to install both versions), you shouldn't put them in the same folder. In some cases (say, poor choices on the part of the developer), they may have the same file name, which will cause you a lot of problems. Do yourself a favor and call your 32-bit VST folder "VST 32-bit" or something like that. Just don't put them all in the same place.

And since you're probably going to be using more 64-bit VSTs than 32-bit ones, I recommend renaming your 32-bit VST folder to something that designates that it's for 32-bit files. You won't be accessing this one as often as the 64-bit version, so that one should just be called "VSTs" (or whatever), and the one for 32-bit VSTs should say it's for 32-bit VSTs. This will be easier to type and/or to find on your system, when it comes time. Trust me.

In any case, note that if you move the VSTs from wherever the installer put them, you cannot use the developer's un-install routine to un-install the VST. Since the file won't be where the developer expects it to be, the un-installer won't find it. This is not a big deal and really is no problem at all. The un-installer will still remove Registry entries and other files and folders, and then all you have to do is manually delete the VST from wherever you put it. And, since you kept your 32-bit, 64-bit and EFFECT VSTs each in their own folders, it will be quick and easy to find the file you need to delete. See? No big deal.

And no matter what you do with moving your VSTs, don't delete the original, default VST folders that are on your system. Every so often, some installer will want to put the VST there, and may not even give you the option to change it. You'll need the folders there for the installation to work properly. (This is especially true for VST3 files.) If you can't find the VST after you install it, look in these other folders that were already on your system. It will be in one of them. Move it to where you want, and run your DAW's plug-in scanner again to update itself (and Windows' Registry).

Happy VST-ing!

Steve
Old 5th April 2017
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
Well, VST3 files are usually in (get this!) \Program Files\Common Files\VST3 (on 64-bit systems).

Why there, under the "Common Files" folder, when there's no corresponding "VST2" folder there? Who the hell knows.

Still, the VST3 files (which have a .VST3 extension) can be moved. Look for the .VST3 files in that VST3 folder, and put them wherever you want. (If you want to stay on the safe side, don't move your iZotope or Waves .VST3 files.)

Again, I still recommend further sorting them based upon developer, and also putting all the EFFECT VSTs into an "Effects" folder, with the developer folders in there, too. This will make your life MUCH easier when it comes time to troubleshoot issues with the VSTs or to remove ones you no longer want.

By the way, did you create a "Program" folder just for your VST folder, or was that a typo above?

You'll also want to keep your 32-bit and 64-bit VST files separate, in separate folders. If, for some reason, you decide to install both versions (or if you don't get an option and you're forced to install both versions), you shouldn't put them in the same folder. In some cases (say, poor choices on the part of the developer), they may have the same file name, which will cause you a lot of problems. Do yourself a favor and call your 32-bit VST folder "VST 32-bit" or something like that. Just don't put them all in the same place.

And since you're probably going to be using more 64-bit VSTs than 32-bit ones, I recommend renaming your 32-bit VST folder to something that designates that it's for 32-bit files. You won't be accessing this one as often as the 64-bit version, so that one should just be called "VSTs" (or whatever), and the one for 32-bit VSTs should say it's for 32-bit VSTs. This will be easier to type and/or to find on your system, when it comes time. Trust me.

In any case, note that if you move the VSTs from wherever the installer put them, you cannot use the developer's un-install routine to un-install the VST. Since the file won't be where the developer expects it to be, the un-installer won't find it. This is not a big deal and really is no problem at all. The un-installer will still remove Registry entries and other files and folders, and then all you have to do is manually delete the VST from wherever you put it. And, since you kept your 32-bit, 64-bit and EFFECT VSTs each in their own folders, it will be quick and easy to find the file you need to delete. See? No big deal.

And no matter what you do with moving your VSTs, don't delete the original, default VST folders that are on your system. Every so often, some installer will want to put the VST there, and may not even give you the option to change it. You'll need the folders there for the installation to work properly. (This is especially true for VST3 files.) If you can't find the VST after you install it, look in these other folders that were already on your system. It will be in one of them. Move it to where you want, and run your DAW's plug-in scanner again to update itself (and Windows' Registry).

Happy VST-ing!

Steve
Drive C/program files/ vst is where my 64 bit vst2 is going. I don't want to use VST3 so I will delete the stuff in the common files/vst3 folder. Windows is weird!

LOL

Thanks again!
Old 5th April 2017
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nu-tra View Post
Drive C/program files/ vst is where my 64 bit vst2 is going. I don't want to use VST3 so I will delete the stuff in the common files/vst3 folder. Windows is weird!

LOL

Thanks again!
You can delete the VST3 files, but if your DAW supports VST3, you might want to reconsider that.

The VST3 versions of plug-ins are generally more efficient with processor and memory usage, allow for re-sizable GUIs, and can also give you the ability to pitch-bend individual notes in a chord (for example, with a guitar). There are several more improvements and enhancements over the VST2 versions.

https://www.steinberg.net/en/company...gies/vst3.html

Half-way down, the "New VST3 Features" tells you what's improved.

Steve
Old 5th April 2017
  #19
I keep reading that vst3 is buggy. I'll give it a shot
Old 6th April 2017
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nu-tra View Post
I keep reading that vst3 is buggy. I'll give it a shot
When it first came out, the support for it was spotty and had some problems, yes. But that was 9 years ago.

Most DAWs and developers have had time to learn how to implement it better, and Steinberg has updated and improved the specifications based upon feedback.

Steve
Old 6th April 2017
  #21
Lives for gear
It's never a good idea to move files that were installed by an installer. In some cases Windows will notice they are missing and attempt to reinstall them.

If the list of plugins in c:....program files(x86)..\vst is the same as c:. \program files and you run Reaper in 64-bit mode then you don't need the x86 ones, so don't bother to install them. You don't need both 32 and 64 bit versions of the same plugins if you run a 64-bit DAW. 64-bit Reaper will load the 64-bit versions. If there some unique plugins that are only in the x86 folder (because they are 32bit) then keep them, and Reaper will invoke the 64/32 bridging to call them.
Old 6th April 2017
  #22
Lives for gear
 
wakestyle's Avatar
VST is about as 'open' as a plugin format that there is. Therefore, many different developers share the format thus, many different directories exist.
You have to control them or use multiple directories. It doesn't matter.
VST3 - you don't try to sort, just leave it. Sorting is automatic by the plugin developer.
Old 7th April 2017
  #23
Gear Addict
 
Dzilizi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lackatee View Post
There's a registry setting for VST plugins in Windows and you generally want to set it before you start installing plugs. Also good to make your own folders for them. I just make folders on the C drive like this

C:\VST\
C:\VST64\

32 bit plugs go in the VST folder and 64 bit go into VST64 and then obviously a sub folder for each company like for example C:\VST\Waves, C:\VST\Fabfilter.. etc

Open regedit

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE>Software - Highlight the Software folder and right click New -> Key
Type VST - Highlight that VST Folder - Right click - New - String Value - Type VstPluginsPath - hit enter - Right click again and Modify it and put in the location the VST folder you created. Keep in mind this is only the setting for the 64 bit plugins. We have to do the same exact process for 32 bit plugs but inside the Wow6432Node folder a couple down from the VST entry we just made. You right click that folder and start the process all over again and then you're good to go. Most installers should recognize the path and auto set the install to the proper VST folder but you just have to check them. Some of them don't.



Anyway, good luck!
Shoot, wish I had seen this before my last load. I set up 2 folders - one for 64 bit in the Program Files and one for 32 bit in Program Files(86) thinking this will be easy.

When the plugin gave me a choice? I put them in the correct folder. But many just loaded with no questions. So I still have around 8 or 10 folders.

There's the 2 I set up, Steinberg has around 4 loaded for Cubase between the actual program and the VST2 and VST3 folders, there's the Sonar ones, and then there are some in the Common Files folder. It is crazy. I know I've loaded things and I still can't find them.

Plus stated 64bit stuff is loading in the Program Files(86). It is just weird.
Old 7th April 2017
  #24
Gear Addict
 
Dzilizi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilDW View Post
It's never a good idea to move files that were installed by an installer. In some cases Windows will notice they are missing and attempt to reinstall them.
This has been my experience.

And? If it is just a dll file? It is usually not a problem to move. But if it is a dll file and other files? It can be messed up if it doesn't know where to look for the sub files. Especially if the developer didn't give you a choice on where to put them.
Old 8th April 2017
  #25
Windows doesn't track where most of the files go during an installation, and if you're just copying a .DLL into a VST folder (as many of the free plug-ins make you do), Windows doesn't track any of that.

Windows also does not replace files that did not come with Windows (and from Microsoft) just because you moved a .DLL. Since Windows doesn't track them, it wouldn't know you moved them, and it wouldn't be able to replace a .DLL from Waves or NI or anyone else, anyway.

No one's forcing anyone to move VSTs, but many people have found it to be much easier to keep track of what they have installed by keeping all the VSTs in the same 2 or 3 folders. I've never had troubles with mine, in any of the DAWs listed in my signature (other than Steinberg and its location of Waves VST3 files). Your mileage may vary, but as a computer consultant for more than 20 years, I can tell you that Windows will not replace third-party .DLLs that you've moved, simply because it won't "know" you've moved them.

Steve
Old 10th April 2017
  #26
Gear Addict
 
Dzilizi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowsOfLife View Post
Windows doesn't track where most of the files go during an installation, and if you're just copying a .DLL into a VST folder (as many of the free plug-ins make you do), Windows doesn't track any of that.

Windows also does not replace files that did not come with Windows (and from Microsoft) just because you moved a .DLL. Since Windows doesn't track them, it wouldn't know you moved them, and it wouldn't be able to replace a .DLL from Waves or NI or anyone else, anyway.

No one's forcing anyone to move VSTs, but many people have found it to be much easier to keep track of what they have installed by keeping all the VSTs in the same 2 or 3 folders. I've never had troubles with mine, in any of the DAWs listed in my signature (other than Steinberg and its location of Waves VST3 files). Your mileage may vary, but as a computer consultant for more than 20 years, I can tell you that Windows will not replace third-party .DLLs that you've moved, simply because it won't "know" you've moved them.

Steve
Sorry, for me it isn't Windows, it is the plugin program. Usually it is plugins that tell the program where the related files are installed that cause the problems if you move anything.

The freebies? Or really any plugin that is just a dll and no other files? I will move. There's always one or two that make their own directories that have more than the dll, so I end up with a mess.

Some of the files can be moved and reconnected. But sometimes it is just easier to set up the DAW to look for all the different places than dealing with moving everything.
Old 10th April 2017
  #27
Gear Addict
 
Lackatee's Avatar
I don't know what's so complicated about it.

Set the registry as I showed above - Install plugs - When the installer shows the location it's going to install, check that it's your VST folder you set in the reg + the companies name - If it's not then change the path... Hit install and the plugs show up in that folder. This is installing software 101. I've never had plugs show up in places I didn't want them to. If you don't just click next next next.. and actually change the location of the path if its wrong, then you would never run into this issue.

For example.. Let's say I'm installing JoeBlowAudio plugs(not real plugs!), and when I go to install the plugs the installer says the VST's will be installed in C:\Program Files(x86\vstplugins\JoeBlowAudio.... Well, we know that JoeBlowAudio hasn't set up their installers correctly and is not reading the VST registry setting I have set, so I just highlight that path or paths and change it to C:\VST\JoeBlowAudio and/or VST64\JoeBlowAudio depending on what I'm installing. (32 or 64 bit or both) Once done, hit install and the plugs show up in those folders.

Again, most installers check the registry these days, but there are some that do not. You will just have to keep an eye on it as you install them.

Old 10th April 2017
  #28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lackatee View Post
I don't know what's so complicated about it.

Set the registry as I showed above - Install plugs - When the installer shows the location it's going to install, check that it's your VST folder you set in the reg + the companies name - If it's not then change the path... Hit install and the plugs show up in that folder. This is installing software 101. I've never had plugs show up in places I didn't want them to. If you don't just click next next next.. and actually change the location of the path if its wrong, then you would never run into this issue.

For example.. Let's say I'm installing JoeBlowAudio plugs(not real plugs!), and when I go to install the plugs the installer says the VST's will be installed in C:\Program Files(x86\vstplugins\JoeBlowAudio.... Well, we know that JoeBlowAudio hasn't set up their installers correctly and is not reading the VST registry setting I have set, so I just highlight that path or paths and change it to C:\VST\JoeBlowAudio and/or VST64\JoeBlowAudio depending on what I'm installing. (32 or 64 bit or both) Once done, hit install and the plugs show up in those folders.

Again, most installers check the registry these days, but there are some that do not. You will just have to keep an eye on it as you install them.

There's nothing particularly complicated about it.

And where can I get these JoeBlowAudio plug-ins you speak of? They sound interesting, and I've read quite a bit about them in the past 6 minutes.

Steve
Old 14th April 2017
  #29
Gear Addict
 
Dzilizi's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lackatee View Post
I don't know what's so complicated about it.

Set the registry as I showed above - Install plugs - When the installer shows the location it's going to install, check that it's your VST folder you set in the reg + the companies name - If it's not then change the path... Hit install and the plugs show up in that folder. This is installing software 101. I've never had plugs show up in places I didn't want them to. If you don't just click next next next.. and actually change the location of the path if its wrong, then you would never run into this issue.

For example.. Let's say I'm installing JoeBlowAudio plugs(not real plugs!), and when I go to install the plugs the installer says the VST's will be installed in C:\Program Files(x86\vstplugins\JoeBlowAudio.... Well, we know that JoeBlowAudio hasn't set up their installers correctly and is not reading the VST registry setting I have set, so I just highlight that path or paths and change it to C:\VST\JoeBlowAudio and/or VST64\JoeBlowAudio depending on what I'm installing. (32 or 64 bit or both) Once done, hit install and the plugs show up in those folders.

Again, most installers check the registry these days, but there are some that do not. You will just have to keep an eye on it as you install them.

This is great if they ask. I just have had some that don't ask where to install. They just install where they want to. Changing the registry will help, I think. But it doesn't help now that I have already installed them all.
Old 14th April 2017
  #30
Lives for gear
 
brockorama's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by xmission View Post
That's bizarre. I took the contents of a VST folder, and dumped it into another.
Reaper looks for folder paths you have added . You can even add an empty directory if that is where you are putting them. Next time Reaper starts it will scan that directory (where you dumped them)
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