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one fast drive vs 2-3 drives raid0
Old 2nd February 2007
  #1
Here for the gear
 

one fast drive vs 2-3 drives raid0

the story: i definitely need some kind of speed increase with BFD. one 7200rpm drive is not cutting it as i increasingly use this thing. i searched around a little but couldn't find a definitive answer so i ask...

would it be better to get one faster (10k or 15k) drive or a 2-4 drive raid0 setup? for how much a 15k drive costs i can go to 4 drives with a controller, and have speed _and_ way too much storage =P (since samples and all that are just on dvds to install i don't really care about redundancy, if it breaks i'll just reinstall the thing)

i read a lot about 2 drive fw800 drives for stuff like ivory (i don't have it but i know it's a drive hog), but i also have no fw800 so internal and a pci controller is my only option...

thanks for any help.

-a
Old 2nd February 2007
  #2
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HI,
i doubt its your drive
BFD is predominately a memory loading sample. BFD by itsself will not exaust a standard drive.

now if you had the full EWQL platiunum bundle or vienna symphonic then yeah raid drives would make sense.

more than likely its your overall system specs.

Scott
ADK
Old 2nd February 2007
  #3
Registered User
 

my setup is as follows:

c: system drive - 150GB Raptor
d: recording drive 1TB - 4 x 250GB Seagate 7200rpm drives Raid 0
e: samples drive 500GB - 2 x 250GB Seagate 7200rpm drives Raid 0
f: Spare - 150GB Raptor (might try a Vista install on here but understand that XP dual boot sucks)

the throughput for my recording drive is up around 160MB / sec - the sample drives are about 100MB / sec - if you are running tons of samples you will want the throughput and my thinking was the extreme fast single drive access times on the raptors.

the raptors are sata1 whereas the seagates are sata2 - thus the seagates can provide the higher throughput overall but the raptors give the higher rpm seek times for the system files and programs.

hope this helps.
Old 2nd February 2007
  #4
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amino's Avatar
The first thing you should do is to get separate disks for different uses like ABGen. If you can get four disks, make a setup like his with C:, D: and E: and use two disks and raid for D:. Tha't's better than one big raid configuration. But still...if the problem is only BFD, I agree with Scott that the problem isn't the hard drive.
Old 2nd February 2007
  #5
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crufty's Avatar
you will always be better with raid vs faster disks.
Old 3rd February 2007
  #6
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thanks for the advice... i ordered an extra gig of ram which was at least cheaper than new HDs. i also already have 3 drives, OS, audio, samples (or at least bfd is on its own drive, small one shot type things are on my system drive as they so rarely get used) plus externals for backups but, they don't stay attached. still, even at high buffer sizes the thing skips up when i use a LOT of the drum samples at once sometimes (especially the larger ones)
Old 9th January 2010
  #7
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DanRock101's Avatar
 

Did you ever get your RAID config? If so, how's it working for you?
Old 9th January 2010
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrniss View Post
the story: i definitely need some kind of speed increase with BFD. one 7200rpm drive is not cutting it as i increasingly use this thing. i searched around a little but couldn't find a definitive answer so i ask...

would it be better to get one faster (10k or 15k) drive or a 2-4 drive raid0 setup? for how much a 15k drive costs i can go to 4 drives with a controller, and have speed _and_ way too much storage =P (since samples and all that are just on dvds to install i don't really care about redundancy, if it breaks i'll just reinstall the thing)

i read a lot about 2 drive fw800 drives for stuff like ivory (i don't have it but i know it's a drive hog), but i also have no fw800 so internal and a pci controller is my only option...

thanks for any help.

-a
A 4 hard drive (7200RPM) RAID 0 will outperform any single SCSI, SAS, SATAII regardless of RPM. Add another 4 or 8 drives to that RAID0 and you'll be copying files so fast, your cables melt
Old 9th January 2010
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcschild View Post
HI,
i doubt its your drive
BFD is predominately a memory loading sample. BFD by itsself will not exaust a standard drive.
BFD HAS to be using disk streaming.
Old 9th January 2010
  #10
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this is a very old thread 07.

1) Raid is not recommended and in fact you will get better performance from spliting your libraries over 2 non raid drives than trying to do it from 1 raid array.

yes a raid array has more bandwidth that a single drive but its not the issue with samples. memory load is the issue. this included how big the cache is on the drive.
Old 9th January 2010
  #11
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25ghosts's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcschild View Post
this is a very old thread 07.

1) Raid is not recommended and in fact you will get better performance from spliting your libraries over 2 non raid drives than trying to do it from 1 raid array.

yes a raid array has more bandwidth that a single drive but its not the issue with samples. memory load is the issue. this included how big the cache is on the drive.
With Kontakt and any other VI ( I dont own BFD) I am getting superior results with a raid0. Superior. THat is why I did it. 1 Drive aint cutting it for me.
Old 9th January 2010
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcschild View Post
this is a very old thread 07.

1) Raid is not recommended and in fact you will get better performance from spliting your libraries over 2 non raid drives than trying to do it from 1 raid array.

yes a raid array has more bandwidth that a single drive but its not the issue with samples. memory load is the issue. this included how big the cache is on the drive.
I don't think its possible to make a generic statement like jschild's. A lot depends on the drives used, their seek times and transfer specs, the bus type, the bus performance, the chipset used and it's performance, NCQ capabilities, the patterns of usage, fragmentation state, etc. On my last system I didn't use RAID and things were fine, but when I rebuilt my system, I decided to use RAID on the same drives to increase the throughput. So far I haven't had any issues.

I do know that RAID puts a much greater strain on the drives. RAID 0 is an accident waiting to happen and I keep a mirror backup of my RAID 0 on an external drive for this reason (I've lost 2 RAID 0 arrays due to disk failure over the years). That's why it's generally recommended that higher spec drives be used for RAID.

But I'm curious about what you mean by memory load: could you elaborate on that? Thanks.
Old 24th March 2010
  #13
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newrigel's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by undertone View Post
I don't think its possible to make a generic statement like jschild's. A lot depends on the drives used, their seek times and transfer specs, the bus type, the bus performance, the chipset used and it's performance, NCQ capabilities, the patterns of usage, fragmentation state, etc. On my last system I didn't use RAID and things were fine, but when I rebuilt my system, I decided to use RAID on the same drives to increase the throughput. So far I haven't had any issues.

I do know that RAID puts a much greater strain on the drives. RAID 0 is an accident waiting to happen and I keep a mirror backup of my RAID 0 on an external drive for this reason (I've lost 2 RAID 0 arrays due to disk failure over the years). That's why it's generally recommended that higher spec drives be used for RAID.

But I'm curious about what you mean by memory load: could you elaborate on that? Thanks.
With velociraptors in RAID 0 you'll be smoking! This guy doesn't know what he's talking about... this is back when drives were slow as molasses and today, the caches are so big that it's not an issue! Look!
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