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How many SSD does one need in a PC for music creation?
Old 18th February 2016
  #1
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How many SSD does one need in a PC for music creation?

I have a relatively new PC running Windows 10. It presently has two SSD drives one for OS/application and one for data and samples. Is it still a best practice to utilize 3 separate drives one for OS/Apps, one for Samples, and one for Data Writing? The reason I asked is my OS/App SSD is stating it is almost full and I was going to replace it with a new larger SSD. Thoughts?
Old 18th February 2016
  #2
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Guitarist9891's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hattrick View Post
I have a relatively new PC running Windows 10. It presently has two SSD drives one for OS/application and one for data and samples. Is it still a best practice to utilize 3 separate drives one for OS/Apps, one for Samples, and one for Data Writing? The reason I asked is my OS/App SSD is stating it is almost full and I was going to replace it with a new larger SSD. Thoughts?
I have one SSD inside my computer for OS. Then 4 External Drives - 3 of them are SSDs.

1) SSD for Projects (250gb)
2) SSD for sample libraries (250gb)
3) SSD for more sample libraries (250gb)
4) HDD for backing up my Projects. (1TB)
Old 18th February 2016
  #3
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yes, that's about right. But I ended up using a WD Black HDD for data. Although the better SSDs are rated for 10 years of pretty hard use, so I'll probably replace with an SSD at some point.
Old 18th February 2016
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guitarist9891 View Post
I have one SSD inside my computer for OS. Then 4 External Drives - 3 of them are SSDs.

1) SSD for Projects (250gb)
2) SSD for sample libraries (250gb)
3) SSD for more sample libraries (250gb)
4) HDD for backing up my Projects. (1TB)
I see you are follow the rule of utilizing 3-4 drives. Being SSD is there an advantage to have so many drives verses one very large drive to do everything or maybe just two?
Old 18th February 2016
  #5
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Guitarist9891's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hattrick View Post
I see you are follow the rule of utilizing 3-4 drives. Being SSD is there an advantage to have so many drives verses one very large drive to do everything or maybe just two?
Well I could do one larger drive for sample libraries instead of 2. But 250gb SSD are not that expensive. So I just got them over time. But OS/Samples/Projects should be on separate drives for optimal performance. And I always like to backup my projects daily - So thats another drive.
Old 18th February 2016
  #6
Gear Maniac
My HDD/SSD setup:

1 120 GB SSD for OS (Win 7 64-bit) and other PC programs (Office, etc.)
1 50 GB SSD for DAW, audio programs and plugins
1 250 GB HDD for audio (projects, data, wav)
1 500 GB HDD for audio samples (Toontrack EZX/SDX, Reason and Sonar libraries)

+ 50 GB SSD (my old OS drive) for videos, games, etc.
+ 300 GB HDD for iTunes library and photos
Old 19th February 2016
  #7
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1 SSD primary for OS and apps. 1 high speed HDD (WD Velociraptor) secondary for storage of everything including projects. I have other HDD drives for additional storage also Velociraptor's. I have what would be local folders like "downloads" "documents" etc as symbolic links that are actually on the secondary drives should the SSD fail.

The theory here is the SSD has finite write limit and after which it starts to corrupt and or die. When it does data is not recoverable. If an HDD dies, there are a few ways to retrieve the lost data, at the extreme you can pull the platters off and put them into another similar drive and it's possible to recover the data.

Surprisingly the WD Velociraptor is very quiet in the roll of secondary drive. As a primary disk aka system OS drive it's pretty damn noisy constantly read/writing data. The SSD is quiet and lightning fast. Nice combo imho.
Old 19th February 2016
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Mulcahy View Post

The theory here is the SSD has finite write limit and after which it starts to corrupt and or die. When it does data is not recoverable. If an HDD dies, there are a few ways to retrieve the lost data, at the extreme you can pull the platters off and put them into another similar drive and it's possible to recover the data.
This the reason I use an HDD for my session files that are always being changed and edited.

But when you think about it, a spinning platter has an even shorter life. My Samsung 850 Pro has a 10 year warranty based on writing 20 GBs a day (if I remember correctly). There's no way I write 20 GBs a day to this SSD, so let's be conservative and say it has a 20 year life. Now, I can't remember what HDD I was using 20 years ago, but I'm pretty sure it's not functioning right now. Even if I could find a computer with the right interface. At the promised 10 years of life it's still outlasting most HDDs.

As far as recovery, backups are paramount (for ANY drive actually).

I would make an argument that a quality SSD has a longer practical life than an HDD. Although my math may be screwed up, I used to cut math class to go play with the band.

And also the fact that SSDs haven't been around long enough to physically prove their claims. It's all magic to me anyway.
Old 19th February 2016
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Me_Likey View Post
But when you think about it, a spinning platter has an even shorter life.
On paper probably? My take? Either one could die tomorrow for whatever reason, so plan accordingly. Mmmhmmhmmhmmwah ha ha ha ha
Old 19th February 2016
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Mulcahy View Post
1 SSD primary for OS and apps. 1 high speed HDD (WD Velociraptor) secondary for storage of everything including projects. I have other HDD drives for additional storage also Velociraptor's. I have what would be local folders like "downloads" "documents" etc as symbolic links that are actually on the secondary drives should the SSD fail.

The theory here is the SSD has finite write limit and after which it starts to corrupt and or die. When it does data is not recoverable. If an HDD dies, there are a few ways to retrieve the lost data, at the extreme you can pull the platters off and put them into another similar drive and it's possible to recover the data.

Surprisingly the WD Velociraptor is very quiet in the roll of secondary drive. As a primary disk aka system OS drive it's pretty damn noisy constantly read/writing data. The SSD is quiet and lightning fast. Nice combo imho.
Well it sounds like everyone still prefers separate HD's in the below configuration.

OS/APP
Sample
Data (Song File)
Back UP


I think I am going to purchase one more 500 SSD. This is how I am going to configure my PC

OS/APP SSD 250G
Sample SSD 500G (new)
Write Data Drive SSD 128G
Cloud Drive (backup) 1T

The write drive is my work in process drive. Once my projects are completed I will move them to the cloud where they will be in storage for retrieval for any reason such as editing if need be and copied back to the Write Drive. Thoughts?
Old 19th February 2016
  #11
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I do cloud backups on top of that also. Part of me just likes the knowledge that I have a working copy that's easily accessible right on my computer. Data can get corrupted when transferred, it's rare but it happens. If a hard drive dies that's the last thing I want to find out if restoring something, i.e. that the only copy I can pull is a cloud copy that's corrupted.

For me the cloud backups are more about the idea that if a major disaster hit, my projects and important data is in another location as a means of fault tolerance.
Old 19th February 2016
  #12
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what cloud are you using?
Old 19th February 2016
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soundgeezer View Post
what cloud are you using?
I use One Drive by MS. I subscribe to Office 365 and get free 1T storage, Skype video/phone for 60 minutes a month, and of course Office. I like it. I use Studio One for DAW and they have a share drive like Cubase and Pro-Tools but I have to see if it data storage. That might be subscription as well. There seems to be much redundant back up on these cloud servers that I am not that concerned with corrupt data. I work for a cloud based software company with thousands of customers data all very sensitive and cannot be corrupted ever for over 8 years. No issues.
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