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What's in a Word Clock distributor? Audio Interfaces
Old 5th August 2015
  #1
What's in a Word Clock distributor?

I know there are already some Word Clock threads here, but this is in a totally different direction. Having learned quite a bit about Word Clock - where before I knew nothing - I still have a lot to learn, and I'm left wondering...

I do know it's 75 Ohm, and ordinary 75 Ohm TV coax cable & connectors works with it.

There are "T" connectors...which apparently some say work fine, while others say that they actually reflect signals, which is not a good thing. It 'seems' that those who claim they work well, possibly are only being 'tolerant' of this signal reflection..?

No matter what, it appears that using a Word Clock distribution device with multiple Word Clock Outs is always the best way to do it...as opposed to both daisy-chaining & the use of "T" connections.

But what's in a Word Clock distributing device? As far as I know, they have a built in distribution amp, which is opposed to dumb "T" connectors (no amp). I do not know the amount of voltage drop 'per' output if distributing Word Clock signals without the use of a distributing amp. I have to assume that the more you device a single output, into a number of outputs, the voltage drop increases. I also do not know if and what voltage drops are acceptable', if at all.

This leads me to some uneducated pondering thoughts.

1) If 75 Ohm TV cable & connections work, would using an ordinary dumb TV splitter work the same as a "T" connection? (splitter having 1 input - with 2 or more outputs).

2) If an ordinary TV distribution amp would work? (having 1 input - with 2 or more outputs, but with an amp).

3) If a more professional video distribution amplifier, which are used in professional & home video applications would work? They can have select a number of input sources to any particular destination, or multiple destinations with distribution amplification.

4) If a video Matrix Switcher would work? These are the most versatile kinds of video distribution devices meant for elaborate systems, of both sources & destinations. They also have video distribution amplification, can accept & route an input to any output destination, or several destinations simultaneously, and any number of inputs to any combination of outputs independently. Obviously, with Word Clock, you would only use a single Master Input.

Again, things I don't know are the typical voltage of a Work Clock is...though I could research and/or test with my multi-meter I guess. I'm assuming that these above devices are also 75 Ohm inputs/outputs.
But being this is 'Word Clock', I do not know if the above video distribution devices - even IF would work fine (electrical spec wise) for only '1' source to '1' destination, but would they take a Word Clock source to multiple output/destinations and arrive at the 'same time' as an actual Word Clock distribution device?

Now I know you're thinking...Hell, just use a device that is actually designed for Word Clock! Or, you may chance damaging something, etc, etc! But after all, I believe Word Clock was actually decided to be used over 'existing' 75 Ohm TV spec devices, connectors & cabling.The bottom line being, on whether such devices mentioned above are electrically compatible or not...?

This really brings me to the last item (#4) that is a video Matrix Switcher that are giving me the most interesting pondering thoughts. Because, unlike the Word clock distributing devices I've seen, they do not have Matrix Switching...allowing you to switch between ANY source to ANY destination, without connection of any other device full time...but just only what you need at any given time, and elimination any other connections/devices that are not being used at times. Having more devices connected in a system may introduce more issues etc.

Currently, I already have a video Matrix Switcher, with VGA type connections for multiple computers & LCD video monitors, allowing me to switch any computer to any video screen in any combination, or one computer to all screens if I want. I also have a Matrix Switcher for audio... analog & digital, both RCA for analog, or s/pdif. I'm considering a Matrix Switch for Toslink as well.

This is what brought me to wondering about Word clock distribution, especially with Matrix Switching capability. And if the above video equipment can be used for this purpose, this would be very interesting.

What say you?

?

?

?

?
Old 5th August 2015
  #2
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Fogal View Post
There are "T" connectors...which apparently some say work fine, while others say that they actually reflect signals, which is not a good thing. It 'seems' that those who claim they work well, possibly are only being 'tolerant' of this signal reflection..?

No matter what, it appears that using a Word Clock distribution device with multiple Word Clock Outs is always the best way to do it...as opposed to both daisy-chaining & the use of "T" connections.

1) If 75 Ohm TV cable & connections work, would using an ordinary dumb TV splitter work the same as a "T" connection? (splitter having 1 input - with 2 or more outputs).

2) If an ordinary TV distribution amp would work? (having 1 input - with 2 or more outputs, but with an amp).

3) If a more professional video distribution amplifier, which are used in professional & home video applications would work? They can have select a number of input sources to any particular destination, or multiple destinations with distribution amplification.

4) If a video Matrix Switcher would work? These are the most versatile kinds of video distribution devices meant for elaborate systems, of both sources & destinations. They also have video distribution amplification, can accept & route an input to any output destination, or several destinations simultaneously, and any number of inputs to any combination of outputs independently. Obviously, with Word Clock, you would only use a single Master Input.

Again, things I don't know are the typical voltage of a Work Clock is...though I could research and/or test with my multi-meter I guess. I'm assuming that these above devices are also 75 Ohm inputs/outputs.
Some thoughts:

A "T" connector is definitely going to generate reflections. You're connecting a 75-ohm source into two 75-ohm destinations in parallel, which yields 37.5 ohms as the destination impedance. When you have mismatched impedances (here, 75 and 37.5 ohms), some of the source signal is going to be reflected back at the point of the mismatch (the T connector in this case).

So as you've correctly guessed, that's the purpose of splitters and distribution amps. A splitter is basically a transformer that's wound so the impedances are kept the same, at the expense of the input voltage being divided among the outputs (i.e. a 1 into 2 splitter divides the input voltage in half). A distribution amp boosts the signal level going into the transformer so by the time it comes out, the voltage levels at the outputs are roughly the same as they were at the input to the distribution amp.

A typical word clock signal is a 5V peak-to-peak square wave at whatever sampling frequency is being used. Typically this is going to be between 32 and 192 kilohertz. An RF/video signal is a much lower voltage, usually under 0.1 volts.

The transformers used in radio frequency video splitters are typically designed to work from about 40 megahertz up to several hundred megahertz (1000 times higher) -- well above the frequency of a word clock signal. TV RF distribution amps, switchers, etc. are also designed for this frequency range.

I guess the main thing to check is what is the frequency range that the equipment you're contemplating is designed to work at, keeping in mind that your word clock signal is going to be in the 32 to 192 kilohertz range, 5 volts peak-to-peak. While anything is possible, it seems unlikely that equipment designed for television / RF signals (even though they're 75 ohm impedance) would work well with a word clock signal.
Old 5th August 2015
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Herb's Avatar
 

It might help if you describe the scenario in which the connections are being used.

I've used a few different clocking setups in the past and haven't had problems but I suppose it depends on the complexity of the setup.

If the setup is simple enough I think properly terminated T connectors would be better than trying to use a device not designed for the job.
Old 6th August 2015
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by TechnoRoom View Post
Some thoughts:

A "T" connector is definitely going to generate reflections. You're connecting a 75-ohm source into two 75-ohm destinations in parallel, which yields 37.5 ohms as the destination impedance. When you have mismatched impedances (here, 75 and 37.5 ohms), some of the source signal is going to be reflected back at the point of the mismatch (the T connector in this case).

So as you've correctly guessed, that's the purpose of splitters and distribution amps. A splitter is basically a transformer that's wound so the impedances are kept the same, at the expense of the input voltage being divided among the outputs (i.e. a 1 into 2 splitter divides the input voltage in half). A distribution amp boosts the signal level going into the transformer so by the time it comes out, the voltage levels at the outputs are roughly the same as they were at the input to the distribution amp.

A typical word clock signal is a 5V peak-to-peak square wave at whatever sampling frequency is being used. Typically this is going to be between 32 and 192 kilohertz. An RF/video signal is a much lower voltage, usually under 0.1 volts.

The transformers used in radio frequency video splitters are typically designed to work from about 40 megahertz up to several hundred megahertz (1000 times higher) -- well above the frequency of a word clock signal. TV RF distribution amps, switchers, etc. are also designed for this frequency range.

I guess the main thing to check is what is the frequency range that the equipment you're contemplating is designed to work at, keeping in mind that your word clock signal is going to be in the 32 to 192 kilohertz range, 5 volts peak-to-peak. While anything is possible, it seems unlikely that equipment designed for television / RF signals (even though they're 75 ohm impedance) would work well with a word clock signal.
Thanks for all that information TechnoRoom!

Regarding the idea of using video Matrix Switcher ... A while back I had communicated with a few manufacturer reps of Matrix Switchers, when I was inquiring about one's that had analog audio & digital audio specifically (as well as having video). At one point one of the reps said something to the effect that the inputs & outputs are simple switches that just pass what's going in, out as if going through a cable & connector. If that's so, voltages & impedance may be unaffected. But then again, that doesn't account for the amplification circuits during multiple distributions.
Old 6th August 2015
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb View Post
It might help if you describe the scenario in which the connections are being used.

I've used a few different clocking setups in the past and haven't had problems but I suppose it depends on the complexity of the setup.

If the setup is simple enough I think properly terminated T connectors would be better than trying to use a device not designed for the job.
"T" connectors ... Perhaps. The full complexity of my set up has yet to become a reality...but I have ideas. For the past couple/few years I've been clocking via my s/pdif digital audio connections, successfully. I've also used my Word Clock connections with my audio cards, although as a secondary connection, not fully knowing how much good it was actually doing.

It's hard to describe my scenario exactly, part is current, and part is a future scenario. But basically it involves multiple computers with 1 to 3 audio interfaces installed in each. All interfaces have Word Clock & digital audio.

Most of the time I work with only one computer powered on at a time, but at other times I need 2 or more (or all) to be clocked together...or will need. For this reason, like with my digital & analog audio, and also video monitoring, I have the matrix Switching capability...that is, being able to matrix switch these signals in any way I can dream of, as needed.
Now with multiple computers (I currently have 3, but will be 4 soon) and with multiple audio interfaces between them...this could be 6 to 8 or more audio interfaces among 4 computers to deal with. I'm now only using coaxial s/pdif between computers, sending digital audio as needed and have no problems, that I can't deal with at least.
My thoughts are that, the more Word Clock connections I have at any given time, the more complicated and the more problematic it may become...in this future scenario that is. It would take a heck of a lot of WC patch cables, connectors, "T" connectors or daisy-chaining... which in this future elaborate scenario may actually be much worse. Again, that's where the idea of a Matrix Switcher for the WC comes in...so only the WC connections/cables that are needed at any given time are actually used. I 'thought' that if the electrical properties were compatible between video equipment & WC, that would be a good solution. All this is really too much to be crawling behind equipment, making cable changes. But as TechRoom pointed out, there are those considerations!
Old 8th August 2015
  #6
Gear Head
One thing to add....

The post I made above applies to the case where the word clock inputs on your devices all have built-in 75 ohm termination, which is fairly typical.

However, some devices either do not have built-in termination, or let you switch whether you want the input to be unterminated or terminated with 75 ohms.

In the case where the input is always unterminated, or where you have the termination switched off for whatever reason, you must place a 75 ohm terminator (essentially a BNC connector with a 75 ohm resistor soldered across its terminals) at the end of the cable run. A T connector can be used for this.
Old 8th August 2015
  #7
nkf
Lives for gear
 

I have several Lake People word clock distribution amps which route an AES/EBU clock or regular wc to up to 16 outputs. These devices are simply great and they run since so many years without giving any problems.
To answer the question: "But what's in a Word Clock distributing device?" I quote from the manual to make clear that it is much more than a massive T connector:
"The 16 outputs are situated on the back panel and marked according to their function. Each output is equipped with its own driver. Under no load conditions the output voltage exceeds 5 Volt.
In order to avoid common impedance matching problems like often faced when dealing with wordclock signals, impedances can be altered internally. Jumpers on the circuit bord will set either 22, 47 or 75 ohm output impedance. Factory preset is 47 ohms. Because the internal output impedance of the drivers is 25 ohm, together with 47 ohm a correct output impedance of nearly 75 ohm is realized ."
Old 11th August 2015
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by TechnoRoom View Post
One thing to add....

The post I made above applies to the case where the word clock inputs on your devices all have built-in 75 ohm termination, which is fairly typical.

However, some devices either do not have built-in termination, or let you switch whether you want the input to be unterminated or terminated with 75 ohms.

In the case where the input is always unterminated, or where you have the termination switched off for whatever reason, you must place a 75 ohm terminator (essentially a BNC connector with a 75 ohm resistor soldered across its terminals) at the end of the cable run. A T connector can be used for this.
Thanks for that addition... the equipment that I'm using which has standard Word Clock are several audio interfaces, specifically older Aardvark Q10's & Aark 24 cards. I do not know whether their Word Clock inputs have built-in 75 Ohm termination. I've never noticed any mention of this in the manual, nor seen any such option in the Aark software control panel. I had not considered that when I had them connected via Word Clock before. How can I tell, or what would I look for specifically?

Not long ago, to prep for WC I've collected a bunch of BNC connectors, "T" connectors & 75 Ohm terminators. I already have 75 Ohm coax cable by the 1000 ft rolls (I use for my electrical business.)

PS, I have been researching those Matrix Video Switchers in the mean time still, and have found one that's rated for 60-359KZ ...close to the 32-192 kilohertz you had mentioned in your previous post (?).

Last edited by Steve Fogal; 11th August 2015 at 02:17 PM..
Old 11th August 2015
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkf View Post
I have several Lake People word clock distribution amps which route an AES/EBU clock or regular wc to up to 16 outputs. These devices are simply great and they run since so many years without giving any problems.
To answer the question: "But what's in a Word Clock distributing device?" I quote from the manual to make clear that it is much more than a massive T connector:
"The 16 outputs are situated on the back panel and marked according to their function. Each output is equipped with its own driver. Under no load conditions the output voltage exceeds 5 Volt.
In order to avoid common impedance matching problems like often faced when dealing with wordclock signals, impedances can be altered internally. Jumpers on the circuit bord will set either 22, 47 or 75 ohm output impedance. Factory preset is 47 ohms. Because the internal output impedance of the drivers is 25 ohm, together with 47 ohm a correct output impedance of nearly 75 ohm is realized ."
Thanks nkf, I've never heard of those units, do you have a link to post? In the mean time I'll try to look that up to see if it's what I have in mind....which was Matrix Switching, and if this doesn't exist I think it should.
At this stage, this is all contemplative..if that's the correct word/term

[EDIT] I did find this...

http://www.lake-people.de/produktdet...Sync-Unit.html

It looks similar to something I already have by Motu

Last edited by Steve Fogal; 11th August 2015 at 02:29 PM..
Old 11th August 2015
  #10
nkf
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Fogal View Post
Thanks nkf, I've never heard of those units, do you have a link to post? In the mean time I'll try to look that up to see if it's what I have in mind....which was Matrix Switching, and if this doesn't exist I think it should.
At this stage, this is all contemplative..if that's the correct word/term

[EDIT] I did find this...

MULTI-SYNC-UNIT - violectric.de

It looks similar to something I already have by Motu
No, it's more like this:
DIGI-TOOL F622 - violectric.de

The ones I have (DSA F63), one wc input to 16 outputs, are not made anymore.
Lake People DSA F63 1 in 16 Wordclockverteiler
Old 13th August 2015
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkf View Post
No, it's more like this:
DIGI-TOOL F622 - violectric.de

The ones I have (DSA F63), one wc input to 16 outputs, are not made anymore.
Lake People DSA F63 1 in 16 Wordclockverteiler
I can't open the bottom link, but 16 WC outputs is abundant. That could work, but not exactly how I was thinking in term of matrices, but maybe with using a dedicated mater WC generator full time, then splitting that up with say a 1X16 WC distributor.


_____________________________

I also found what appears to be some generic pass through devices with BNC connectors, one such interesting unit is this one...



Remote BNC switch Boxes from LinkBone

It said Matrix Swicher, but I'm not 100% sure it's designed for multiple outs, or just point to point, which could be a handy box for generic purposes. It does show this, which looks like 1 input to multiple//



It's 50 Ohms, not 75 Ohms. They also make boxes for XLR's etc.

Last edited by Steve Fogal; 13th August 2015 at 06:43 AM..
Old 13th August 2015
  #12
nkf
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Fogal View Post
I can't open the bottom link, but 16 WC outputs is abundant. That could work, but not exactly how I was thinking in term of matrices, but maybe with using a dedicated mater WC generator full time, then splitting that up with say a 1X16 WC distributor.
The link works for me, just double checked it. Anyway, these devices work very good, Lake People makes usually broadcast equipment for German radio and TV stations and reliability is a must. There were several variants of these devices, I have one which can be separated into three separate word clock distributors (WCD F64), some have the option for a master clock generator. In my situation the master clock is my Yamaha DM2000. I have no need to switch between several word clock sources. I did this long time ago and I found it to cumbersome with my extensive setup and streamlined everything to one fixed word clock scheme. Several SRCs with word clock input are used for synths with non-clockable digital outputs like V-Synths etc.
Old 13th August 2015
  #13
Hi nkf, the link is actually working this morning, last night I tried several times and no go...huh. A 1 IN X 16 OUT WC distribution unit would certainly cover any number of devices my current, or future scenario.

You do make a good point about one fixed WC scheme. It would be very cumbersome to have to connect/disconnect/connect WC's as needed, without the use of some kind of WC matrix switcher...which would allow easy switching of only which devices you need, and eliminate all other stuff not being used...if that really even matters!(?).

Like I mentioned, this was something I was contemplating. And I realize what techRoom was saying ... that my 'bright idea' is unlikely to work properly. My last link of the LinkBone stuff, likely does not allow for the proper distribution circuitry necessary to divide WC signals. Where as the typical video matrix switchers do have distribution circuitry, but then are often designed with a different frequency in mind. Neither specifically stated as being designed for WC.

I do have a Motu clocking generator/distributor unit, though it doesn't have 'multiple' WC outputs, which ultimately I think is best, rather than use "T" connections or daisy-chaining. Although I'm currently only using s/pdif digital audio among different PC's audio interfaces (which I have an s/pdif Matrix Switcher for), and digital audio carries it's own clock (I also have adat lightpipe capability that I may implement)... I was thinking it may be best to also combine regular WC...especially if I expand my system.

Last edited by Steve Fogal; 13th August 2015 at 04:16 PM..
Old 14th October 2015
  #14
Ok, update to my crazy idea for this ...

I contacted a matrix switcher manufacturer (Extrons technical support). And as I 'understand' it, the guy said that their BNC video matrix switcher is capable of receiving a 5 volt signal source (0.5 to 5 volts) and will send out a 5 volt signal on it's outputs. Although will cut of anything over 150 Mhz, which I'm thinking should be ok as I always use a 44.1 sampling frequency. Though I'm unclear about whether it's just the dedicated 'sync' ports, and/or the video I/O ports as well...?

Here's a quote of what he said..

EXTRON TECH SUPPORT;
Quote:
Steve,

The "sync" channels on our switcher can accept a 0.5V - 5Vp-p signal. However there's typically an Auto Gain Controller (AGC) which brings the level on the output up to 5Vp-p.

There are two sync channels, horizontal and vertical. Only the horizontal can operate within a range of kHz, typically 15kHz to 150kHz. This is going to be the problem point for you, anything over 150kHz will be clipped off.

Therefore, the Matrix will provide input & output routing (any to any) however the circuitry will not perform at 192kHz.

Having some things unclear, I then responded & sent a 2nd email question, asking/clarifying this...

ME;
Quote:
The sampling rate I always use/record at is 44.1 Khz (the low end of the word clock 32 Khz to 192 khz range/capability) and I'll never record at, nor have a need to go up to 192 Khz, therefore the BNC word clock outputs of my audio sound card interfaces will be sending a corresponding 44.1 Khz signal. So it at least seems that a word clock signal- as long as it's set within/under the Extrons range/capability will pass through to the selected outputs....or is that just the 'sync' output?

To clarify, you said the "sync" channels can accept a 0.5V - 5Vp-p signal... but will the BNC video input channels also accept a 0.5V - 5Vp-p signal too? And send 5 volts to it's video outputs? Or just it's dedicated 'sync' input/output?
I realize/understand the dedicated BNC 'sync' input/output is designed to accept/send a master clock signal source (assuming standard word clock source), and it's video I/O's are designed to receive/send actual 'video' sources to selected destinations.
Although what I had in mind - slightly different to the intended design - is being able to route any one of my sound cards BNC word clock outputs (as my selected master clock), to any other one, or several other sound cards BNC word clock receiving inputs (as slaves) simultaneously. The way to accomplish this, would be to only use the Extrons 'video' BNC I/O's (not the dedicated 'sync' I/O's)...again, if the video inputs could simply pass-through an incoming 44.1 Khz @ 5 volts signal (any to any) and/or (any one to several simultaneously).

Alternatively, I own a master word clock device, by Mark Of The Unicorn (MOTU), a Digital Time Piece (DTP) it's capable of sending a master clock signal source (at my selected sample rate of 44.1 Khz), this could be fed into the Extrons 'sync' input...as long as the 'video' outputs can pass-through the 44.1 Khz @ close to 5 volts. I was told by someone, that word clock may not be reliable under 3 volts, however I don't how true this is (?)
I'd prefer to not use a separate master clock device (my MOTU), but rather use any one of my selected audio interfaces as my master clock at any given time.

PS, currently I'm using my RCA coaxial s/pdif digital audio I/O's on my sound cards for my clock source, along with my digital audio among my audio recording PC's. The s/pdif's run in/out of an 8X8 video/audio/digital audio matrix switcher of a different manufacturer. I'm just using it for it's RCA digital audio connections, not using the RCA video capabilities. I'm using it in the same way I described for the Extron units with word clock. Although, my current matrix switchers s/pdif digital audio I/O's are actually designed for s/pdif digital audio, and it works excellent. I was hoping for the same success for my standard BNC word clock, as I'm told BNC word clock is more accurate & reliable than clocking via digital audio (s/pdif, Toslink, optical adat, and AES/EBU etc).
Old 14th October 2015
  #15
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Fogal View Post
Ok, update to my crazy idea for this ...

I contacted a matrix switcher manufacturer (Extrons technical support). And as I 'understand' it, the guy said that their BNC video matrix switcher is capable of receiving a 5 volt signal source (0.5 to 5 volts) and will send out a 5 volt signal on it's outputs. Although will cut of anything over 150 Mhz, which I'm thinking should be ok as I always use a 44.1 sampling frequency. Though I'm unclear about whether it's just the dedicated 'sync' ports, and/or the video I/O ports as well...?

Here's a quote of what he said..

EXTRON TECH SUPPORT;



Having some things unclear, I then responded & sent a 2nd email question, asking/clarifying this...

ME;
While I commend your motivation to research all of this, as a guy who has a lot of experience with Word Clock and high end audio over the last 20 years, allow me to make a recommendation.

The quality of the waveform of the WC signal you provide, specifically the squareness of the rising and falling edges, can have an audible impact on your gear, depending on the gear. Also, WC prefers high quality cables and the shorter the better.

I would suggest you drop $100 US on something like this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I've been using an Aardync DA for the last 15 years as a part of a large setup and it has been flawless. An excellent WC DA without any trial and error or guessing/hoping involved.
Old 14th October 2015
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Getalife2 View Post
While I commend your motivation to research all of this, as a guy who has a lot of experience with Word Clock and high end audio over the last 20 years, allow me to make a recommendation.

The quality of the waveform of the WC signal you provide, specifically the squareness of the rising and falling edges, can have an audible impact on your gear, depending on the gear. Also, WC prefers high quality cables and the shorter the better.

I would suggest you drop $100 US on something like this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I've been using an Aardync DA for the last 15 years as a part of a large setup and it has been flawless. An excellent WC DA without any trial and error or guessing/hoping involved.
Thanks, but your link shows a USB to midi adapter

Did you mean an older AardSync by Aardvark? I'm actually running several Aardvark audio interfaces. If so, I've had been eyeballing those on eBay, but doesn't quite have enough WC outputs... that is, if planning on running an individual WC cable to every single piece of gear from a WC distributor unit.


And yes, this idea has a lot of guessing, hoping involved. And you make a good point, in that especially not having much experience in using BNC WC myself, I wouldn't have anything to compare this 'matrix thing' against a well known 'proper' device....even if it works...?

Although with another crazy idea I had, using a matrix switcher (designed for video/audio applications) for my RCA coxial s/pdif I/O's (digital audio & clocking through it), it actually works much better than running all s/pdif's in & out of several audio interfaces in a daisy-chain. I can send the master out, into the matrix to any one, or all others at once as needed.

Then again, with a well established piece of clocking distributor device, the WC signals would be distributed to all devices, at all times, whether power on at any given time or not....which may not be as bad as I thought. I just get caught up in my wild idea's sometimes.


Last edited by Steve Fogal; 14th October 2015 at 07:06 PM..
Old 14th October 2015
  #17
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Fogal View Post
Thanks, but your link shows a USB to midi adapter

Did you mean an older AardSync by Aardvark? I'm actually running several Aardvark audio interfaces. If so, I've had been eyeballing those on eBay, but doesn't quite have enough WC outputs... that is, if planning on running an individual WC cable to every single piece of gear from a WC distributor unit.


And yes, this idea has a lot of guessing, hoping involved. And you make a good point, in that especially not having much experience in using BNC WC myself, I wouldn't have anything to compare this 'matrix thing' against a well known 'proper' device....even if it works...?

Although with another crazy idea I had, using a matrix switcher (designed for video/audio applications) for my RCA coxial s/pdif I/O's (digital audio & clocking through it), it actually works much better than running all s/pdif's in & out of several audio interfaces in a daisy-chain. I can send the master out, into the matrix to any one, or all others at once as needed.

Then again, with a well established piece of clocking distributor device, the WC signals would be distributed to all devices, at all times, whether power on at any given time or not....which may not be as bad as I thought. I just get caught up in my wild idea's sometimes.

What the heck? How did that get there? Sorry, try this:

What's in a Word Clock distributor?Aardvark Sync Da Universal Synchronization Distribution Unit 1x6 Word Clock | eBay

If you need more outs, get 2. The quality of the Aardvard clocking gear is excellent, even compared to some of the $5000 sync generators I've used in high end settings.
Old 15th October 2015
  #18
I thought you were pulling my leg with that USB to midi thing at 1st, ha,ha.

Thanks, I DO like Aardvark stuff. I assume that these Aarkvark Sync's do not generate a Word Clock signal themselves? If not, then there would be a need for a master clock source to feed it. How would two of these be best connected for more outputs?
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