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Sound Card Advise?
Old 2nd May 2015
  #1
Gear Head
 

Sound Card Advise?

I currently own a Focusrite Scarlett 8i6 and I'm recording at 96Khz. When reading the manual it states that the frequency response for inputs and outputs is 20hz to 20khz.

http://uk.focusrite.com/usb-audio-in...-specification

Does this mean I'm not actually recording at 96Khz due to the 20Khz frequency response?

I'm planing on upgrading the Focusrite and would like some advice on alternatives that have inputs and outputs with a minimum of 96Khz frequency response?


Thanks
Old 2nd May 2015
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by sound girl View Post
I currently own a Focusrite Scarlett 8i6 and I'm recording at 96Khz. When reading the manual it states that the frequency response for inputs and outputs is 20hz to 20khz.

Technical Specification | Focusrite

Does this mean I'm not actually recording at 96Khz due to the 20Khz frequency response?

I'm planing on upgrading the Focusrite and would like some advice on alternatives that have inputs and outputs with a minimum of 96Khz frequency response?


Thanks
That's just the standard audio spec they are stating, 20Hz to 20kHz. When recording with a 96kHz sample rate you will capture a frequency response of half that number, which would be 48kHz. This is due to the way sampling works.

If you want to capture an actual frequency response of 96kHz you would have to record with a 192kHz sample rate.

The best way to see what you have actually captured is to view your file as a spectrogram. I use RX4, but there are other ways to do this. I'm sure there's free software somewhere that can do it too. Here's an example to show what I mean. The other day I recorded some wood floor creaks in 24/96. Here's the spectrogram in RX4:




If you click and view the full size image you can see that my mics have content up to about 35kHz and there is background noise captured all the up to 48kHz.
Old 2nd May 2015
  #3
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dheming View Post
That's just the standard audio spec they are stating, 20Hz to 20kHz. When recording with a 96kHz sample rate you will capture a frequency response of half that number, which would be 48kHz. This is due to the way sampling works.

If you want to capture an actual frequency response of 96kHz you would have to record with a 192kHz sample rate.
Thanks for the informative response. Yeah I'll use the spectrum in max msp and check some vinyl samples to see what's going on.

When you mention 'stating the standard audio spec.' Does that mean all analogue inputs and outputs on many devices have a wider frequency response than whats stated?

Do you have any recommendations for sound cards that can actually record full frequency samples at 192Khz?
Old 2nd May 2015
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by sound girl View Post
Thanks for the informative response. Yeah I'll use the spectrum in max msp and check some vinyl samples to see what's going on.

When you mention 'stating the standard audio spec.' Does that mean all analogue inputs and outputs on many devices have a wider frequency response than whats stated?

Do you have any recommendations for sound cards that can actually record full frequency samples at 192Khz?
It gets complicated because there are filters involved in both the inputs (ADC) and the outputs (DAC) of sound cards and interfaces. Since the filters change depending on the sample rate being used manufacturers would have to quote specific frequency responses for each and every sample rate that the device supports. Most do not do this and simply quote 20Hz to 20kHz to keep it simple. That's the way I understand it at least.

As for recommendations, what is your budget and what is the application? MAC or PC? How many channels I/O? Mic preamps or line level only?
Old 2nd May 2015
  #5
Jtt
Gear Addict
 
Jtt's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dheming View Post
That's just the standard audio spec they are stating, 20Hz to 20kHz. When recording with a 96kHz sample rate you will capture a frequency response of half that number, which would be 48kHz. This is due to the way sampling works.

If you want to capture an actual frequency response of 96kHz you would have to record with a 192kHz sample rate.

The best way to see what you have actually captured is to view your file as a spectrogram. I use RX4, but there are other ways to do this. I'm sure there's free software somewhere that can do it too. Here's an example to show what I mean. The other day I recorded some wood floor creaks in 24/96. Here's the spectrogram in RX4:




If you click and view the full size image you can see that my mics have content up to about 35kHz and there is background noise captured all the up to 48kHz.
I think this is confusing two different things, and I doubt that there is anything wrong with the interface.

The 20-20 figure is the audio range that is represented. The 96k is the sample rate and has no practical effect on the range that is captured (within the limitations of human hearing).
Old 2nd May 2015
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jtt View Post
I think this is confusing two different things, and I doubt that there is anything wrong with the interface.

The 20-20 figure is the audio range that is represented. The 96k is the sample rate and has no practical effect on the range that is captured (within the limitations of human hearing).
Right, but the OP's question was if she was capturing data above 20kHz when recording at 96kHz sample rate. My example shows this visually. You capture data up to 48kHz when recording at 96kHz sample rate, regardless of its specs saying the inputs have 20Hz to 20kHz response.

She wasn't asking if the data in between 20Hz to 20kHz was more accurately captured when recording at 96kHz, nor was I implying that to be that case.
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