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I Want To Be A Recording Engineer - US STATISTICS
Old 18th June 2012
  #61
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplesky View Post
So are alot of the well paid studio guys in a union? I am guessing the Hollywood folks making the $30hr range are probably in a union and have benefits.
If you are anti-union keep it to yourself plz. My guess is the recording pros making good consistent money are in a union.
I make good, consistent money and I am not in any union.
Old 18th June 2012
  #62
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Eppstein View Post
Out of recording school? Jobs in the music industry?

Please elaborate - exactly where are these "jobs"? Did they involve working for a relative?

Now, out of LAW SCHOOL, well, I'd have a hard time believing that, either, but it sounds somewhat less dubious. Even doctors don't make that kind of money right out of school.
After 25 years of being a musician and audio engineer, I just graduated from law school. Law students are seeing very similar problems with employment. While the top tier of students are getting some good jobs at over $100k a year (along with the several $100k of debt), I know some that have graduated in the last few years that still don't have jobs. Through 2008, a law degree meant guaranteed employment, but law schools are now doing the same kind of massaging of employment specs that we're talking about for audio schools. In fact, a group of New York area students have filed a class action suit against some schools for misrepresentation. Add to that the huge increase in tuition and debt load and you have yet another speculative bubble.

One thing that a law career had that a music career didn't was the idea of being able to work your way up in a company so that there would be some financial security and of course, there were company benefits. As a partner, you have to hustle for business, but the rewards are pretty good. However, now most lawyers are like engineers or musicians, you have to be constantly lining work up. Clients no longer want to support the lifestyle lawyers had made for themselves, so they are more skeptical of the hours that are being billed and less willing to pay for the resources that lawyers use (I was flabbergasted to find out that a small to medium firm can be paying $40k a month for a single legal research tool! Westlaw and Lexis are making a killing off of the online research world).

So, for myself, it looks like more years of scraping by, but hopefully my music career can support my law habit.
Old 18th June 2012
  #63
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgrotto View Post
I make good, consistent money and I am not in any union.


Post production. The unionized engineers are exclusively in post production (TV/Advertising/Films) from what I've seen. In close to 30 years, I've never seen a unionized music engineer doing albums.

AND, there is no "consistent" even with unionized engineers unless you are employed by a busy stage and have some seniority. At least that's been my experience.
Old 19th June 2012
  #64
Gear Maniac
 

So do many engineers have any ownership in studios?
Seems like it would make sense to try and maybe work out a deal where you buy into a piece of a studio.
Not straight out of school but for a guy who is getting established.
I am just wondering.
Old 19th June 2012
  #65
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplesky View Post
So do many engineers have any ownership in studios?
Seems like most studio's are owned by engineers, so I'd say the answer to your question is yes. I personally can't think of any engineers that I know who don't have a personal studio of SOME sort....
Old 19th June 2012
  #66
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AwwDeOhh's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
Seems like most studio's are owned by engineers, so I'd say the answer to your question is yes. I personally can't think of any engineers that I know who don't have a personal studio of SOME sort....
+1
There are definetly 'freelancer' types that don't own a building, but certainly they'll have at least a modest setup of their own, if not a "home-base" [not necessarily 'home-base' as in based in their home, but someone else's facility that they'll rent] studio they frequently use.
Old 19th June 2012
  #67
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinhurwitz View Post
So, for myself, it looks like more years of scraping by, but hopefully my music career can support my law habit.
................Sound of crickets chirping in response................back to thread.
Old 20th June 2012
  #68
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
................Sound of crickets chirping in response................back to thread.


What? No love for the attorney's plight???

Somehow, I just don't think their situation is quite as dire as the typical musicians. But maybe I'm just naive.....


So yes, back to $25 an hour being a normal wage for someone who's been working in the field for a decade or two with high end success.....

Like someone said in another thread,,,,,,,we should have been plumbers if we wanted to eat.
Old 20th June 2012
  #69
Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post


What? No love for the attorney's plight???

Somehow, I just don't think their situation is quite as dire as the typical musicians. But maybe I'm just naive.....
A barista is still a barista!

Old 22nd August 2012
  #70
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajbianco View Post
Thats some pretty shocking pay figures. Here in australia basic tradespeople like bricklayers or carpenters are making 2 to 5 times that depending on how far they go with their business. U can even make more than that working in a call centre.
Old 22nd August 2012
  #71
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinhurwitz View Post
After 25 years of being a musician and audio engineer, I just graduated from law school. Law students are seeing very similar problems with employment. While the top tier of students are getting some good jobs at over $100k a year (along with the several $100k of debt), I know some that have graduated in the last few years that still don't have jobs. Through 2008, a law degree meant guaranteed employment, but law schools are now doing the same kind of massaging of employment specs that we're talking about for audio schools. In fact, a group of New York area students have filed a class action suit against some schools for misrepresentation. Add to that the huge increase in tuition and debt load and you have yet another speculative bubble.

One thing that a law career had that a music career didn't was the idea of being able to work your way up in a company so that there would be some financial security and of course, there were company benefits. As a partner, you have to hustle for business, but the rewards are pretty good. However, now most lawyers are like engineers or musicians, you have to be constantly lining work up. Clients no longer want to support the lifestyle lawyers had made for themselves, so they are more skeptical of the hours that are being billed and less willing to pay for the resources that lawyers use (I was flabbergasted to find out that a small to medium firm can be paying $40k a month for a single legal research tool! Westlaw and Lexis are making a killing off of the online research world).

So, for myself, it looks like more years of scraping by, but hopefully my music career can support my law habit.
lawyers deserve nothing more than the minimum wage! heh
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