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Copywriting songs DAW Software
Old 2nd January 2011
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
Bilic's Avatar
 

Copywriting songs

Planning on recording an album in the future.. want to know how i can get it copyrighted? I heard if you just burn it to a cd and mail it to yourself, is that true?

Thanks
Old 2nd January 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
 
w_stylz's Avatar
Poor mans copyright..

Technically, as soon as you record it, you are the copyright owner but that is not always going to stand up in court so I would suggest paying the copyright office to copyright the song. If you want to save some money, you can register a "collection of songs" for the one copyright fee but this can cause issues in the long run if you start licensing/selling them to different people so it is best to just pay the per song fee in order to avoid any problems later.

Im not a lawyer but I sometimes play one on GS
Old 2nd January 2011
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
Unexplainedbacon's Avatar
 

That's the "poor" mans copyright and really not a strong argument in court.

You need to write to the Library of Congress, Copyright Office (101 Independence Ave., S.E., Washington, D.C. 20559-6000) Or find them online, U.S. Copyright Office and obtain a bunch of forms.

The Form for sound recordings is called an "SR Form", you can get it under the Forms link, along with any other applicable forms like form "VA" for your album artwork etc.

I cant remember it all exactly, but you have to copyright the songs individually as a performance (aka your performance of original/cover material) then also the intellectual property that the songs contain. I think that requires sending in Lyrics and transcriptions of the sheet music etc. A fairly complicated process, and thats only registering a "claim to copyright". They get so many submissions, It's impossible for them to guarantee your submission doesn't infringe on another copyright. Therefore If there were to be a dispute you'd essentially have a dated claim, and a judge would review each and decide if there were an infringement and then issue a ruling.


Hope that helps!
Old 5th January 2011
  #4
Lives for gear
 
fastlane's Avatar
 

The above posts are bang on and for the US you should register with the us copyright office. But for the rest of the world prove of copyright will cover you for both statutory and actual damages.

As far as I know canada doesn't have a copyright registry office but feel free to correct me on that one if anyone knows better
Old 5th January 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 
AwwDeOhh's Avatar
 

Since you're in Canada, start here:
Canadian Intellectual Property Office - Copyrights


I believe* you can register in the US L.O.C. too, if you're planning on releasing product in the States.
U.S. Copyright Office


*something to look up!
Old 26th April 2011
  #6
Gear Maniac
 

Hi, I have a question
If I live in Europe and want to release my album in USA in stores like Itunes Amazon etc through Tunecore or CD Baby
-the album consists of 6 songs
Is it absolutely necessary to register them in LOC each independently or
registering as a collection will suffice
what is a fundamental difference ?
Old 1st May 2011
  #7
Lives for gear
 
sventvkg's Avatar
 

I have the earliest demos made of my tunes and all digital files are time stamped. I could provide them as proof that I wrote the songs and there are records of me performing many of the songs I have written in public. If the thief that stole them can't prove he wrote them and I have proof of concept the jury will rule in my favor. When you write a song it's copywritten. Just be smart and record a demo in Pro Tools etc.
Old 3rd May 2011
  #8
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilic View Post
Planning on recording an album in the future.. want to know how i can get it copyrighted? I heard if you just burn it to a cd and mail it to yourself, is that true?

Thanks

That was made inadmissible in a court of law under the 1976 Copyright Act. SO don't do it. It's pointless and will only give you a FALSE idea that you have your bases covered.

The moment you put your creative idea into a tangle medium (write it down, record it, sing it into a recorder, etc..)... the moment it is put into something tangible it become copyrighted!! You do not need to register it. You are now the proud owner of whatever you created.

NOW, here's the part people often over look. If you ever find yourself in a situation that you feel someone has infringed upon your copyright and wish to take them to court. The law is that you must first register it with the Library of Congress before you can do so.

This is why many people go ahead and register it with the LOC.gov website. B/c while you're protected, you will have to prove that you created the item first and this is but one more piece of ammunition that you will have should you find yourself infringed upon.

It's super super simple to register at the LOC.gov site. You can do it all online and you can submit MULTIPLE works at the same time for the basic fee. You can group them all together and claim them as a series of works (think movements in a symphony). So for 35.00 you can register pretty much every song you've written thus far.

So in short: no, you don't have to register... but you really really really should.
Old 3rd May 2011
  #9
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TankT34 View Post
Hi, I have a question
If I live in Europe and want to release my album in USA in stores like Itunes Amazon etc through Tunecore or CD Baby
-the album consists of 6 songs
Is it absolutely necessary to register them in LOC each independently or
registering as a collection will suffice
what is a fundamental difference ?

If you wish to register them at the US LOC you can do them as a collection.... the real question is: do you need to? Under the Berne Convention copyright laws between like minded countries is held up regardless of process. So if you live in a bigger european country that is part of the berne agreement then I'm not so sure you even have to.

See if your country is listed. It's likely you don't need to do more than what your country of origin requires:

List of parties to international copyright agreements - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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