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The modular bug, I may have caught it.
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Lives for gear
 

The modular bug, I may have caught it.

Still just shopping around but I have most everything picked out. My experience and understanding of hardwired synths is proving useful, though I understand the differences as well. I may downsize my current pieces to finance the modular set up but still undecided on all what to do.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Congratulations Sir. A wise choice. I tried to innoculate myself with a Moog SubPhatty (and software modular) but I keep buying things that can be connected. Similar to Toxoplasma gondi where the infected mouse loses it's fear of cats.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Study everything. YouTube has a heap of stuff to watch and listen to in order to learn.

Try to set aside your assumptions and previous ideas about sequencing, sound design, synthesis and workflow. Modular comes at a lot of things sideways compared to normal DAWs, sequencers and synths. It's important to learn about these alien approaches and decide whether you want to use some of them before you buy too much since it can completely revolutionise how you approach your rig, your music and your whole creative process.

Download VCV rack and muck about with it quite a lot. It lets you test a whole bunch of modular concepts as well as effectively trial similar virtual versions of modules before you spend a lot of coin. It's a great sandpit to learn and explore. I keep finding things in here that confuse me entirely, but researching how to use them often sends me to an "OMG that's a whole new approach I didn't realise was possible" point when I "get it".

Get an account on modulargrid. Look at what other people are including in their racks and what modules are the most popular - there are good reasons why they are popular even if you don't understand why yet. Build any aspirations you have virtually on modulargrid before proceeding to check HP, power requirements etc.

Having a decent idea of what you want from your modular system would probably help even though it will evolve as you learn.

Buy slowly. I kinda wish I'd bought a USB+MIDI to CV module, a USB audio interface module and a powered rack as my first items. Then I should have researched and tested ideas extensively in VCV before buying one or a few modules to put into that rack (you could substitute with interfaces to existing gear if you're already hardware based). That way I would not have bought so many modules that don't see much use any more. I could have incrementally bought just what I was missing and bought wisely at each increment.

Speaking of $ and increments and avoiding too many issues there: Setting up an account with a non-threatening deposit from each pay check (or similar) where the balance grows while you are researching your next step might be a sensible scheme. When the balance exceeds the price you are good to buy that way. The anticipation and reward from this approach would sure beat buyer's regret.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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drxcm's Avatar
 

^^

Definitely one approach - the other is to just buy some stuff - plenty of great second hand modules around too. Figure it out for a while and then buy more stuff.

Best advice I have is buy a the case size you eventually want to have - don't skimp - good power and the right size case makes you set for the future - which of course involves buying a ton of modules.

Part of the fun is experimenting - don't get bogged down in over-researching it
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Lives for gear
 

Whatever plan you start with, will likely not be where you end up with. Modular is just like that.. it's hard to really know how you're going to interract with it until you really dig in. It's a fun process, just kind of expensive and time consuming.

I find it interesting, because unlike traditional synths the workflow and interaction is completely different.

in my experience (yours may vary):
the good - I can sit down at the modular and noodle and come up with something resembling a piece of music in a fairly short amount of time.
the bad - that piece of music is pretty much never what I intended.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
Even if the modular rush is slowing, its still growing and pretty much here to stay... Sure you'll find the odd exception, but you don't have to look into even semi-modular to find almost everything released these days has some form of CV/gate capabilties.

Its also not an either/or proposition - you don't need to get rid of everything else and you don't have to start with a completely fleshed out case. Think of the hump of your first case and power supply as just setting up some infrastructure and capability - after that there's no barrier to picking up single modules here and there, be they for the modular itself, or things like filters or sequencers that can transform the rest of your gear... otherwise think you'll increasingly find youself frustrated and if you're interested at this stage, its pretty much inevitable that you'll end up there sooner or later, so why not start now... its really not the plunge all these "going modular" posts might make it out to be... enjoy!
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Gear Guru
 
Derp's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by drxcm View Post
Definitely one approach - the other is to just buy some stuff - plenty of great second hand modules around too. Figure it out for a while and then buy more stuff.
This is the approach I recommend. Get the stuff that caught your eye in the first place, add modules that get them to play together, and then once you've done that, you'll have a better understanding of what it is that you want to get out of modular and can buy/sell accordingly.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
IEC
Gear Nut
 
IEC's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drxcm View Post
^^

Definitely one approach - the other is to just buy some stuff - plenty of great second hand modules around too. Figure it out for a while and then buy more stuff.

Best advice I have is buy a the case size you eventually want to have - don't skimp - good power and the right size case makes you set for the future - which of course involves buying a ton of modules.

Part of the fun is experimenting - don't get bogged down in over-researching it
agree! I just bought whatever was cheaply available at first, then continued adding stuff if i really wanted it or it was available cheap. ended up loving lots of stuff i probably wouldnt have tried otherwise. my only advice would be to be wary of buying things that you *think you might need/use later.*.. i did this myself and just ended up selling it when i ran out of space!
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