The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Thank You, This is the End.
Old 2 days ago
  #31
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth Guru View Post
During my years of buying an album based on a song I heard on the radio and realizing that the rest of the tracks were crap. I realized just how many musicians are out there that become a "One hit Wonder" never to be heard again. Not everyone makes it to the top.
Actually it's more like hardly anybody makes it to the top.
Old 2 days ago
  #32
Lives for gear
 
GeneHall's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
Actually it's more like hardly anybody makes it to the top.
Exactly.
The top is bought and paid for and served up in dizzying flurry backed up by massive marketing budgets to the collective narcissistic populists far more interested in the branded celebrity profile attached to it, little to no regard whether or not any actual musical substance is obvious and in the mix (so to say). What I see on the charts is not indicative of musical prowess or great songwriting necessarily, in alarming disproportion. And celebrity is bought and paid for , music is just about numbers and without strong numbers, seems only incidental to the celebrity' branding campaign. I don't mean that to come off as cynical, rather it's really all I'm seeing , unless I want to participate in any delusions that would sway that observation. Above all, I believe now more than ever we as creators must be as true to ourselves as possible, come to terms with the hostile volatility of whatever semblance of music business remains in the realm of music, and just do what we do, for ourselves and our own truth.
I do understand the urge to quit and say there can be no possible ascension to a wider audience or capacity to be solely self sustaining with music, but that is a misnomer that is fueled by not having a realistic view of success actually is, and what that top tier is really all about or has become about.

Most of the younger artists coming into my world are from bucked up middle class families who have the money to throw at a childs desire, but sadly I also notice it is also a way in which these enabling parents avoid having a relationship/ or speak using their words with their kids.., and the perception of success that I hear back is similar to some of the core issues in this thread.., "if I can't be famous and rich than I am wasting my time". Very rare if ever do I hear anything like " How can I improve my abilities as an artist?". Pathetic and nauseating to know so many can only define themselves as artists by whether or they have attained celebrity status or seen as temporary greatness via some reality tv show contest ( for example). Maybe it has always been this way, I don't know, but in my years of experience working as everything from a production assistant to an artist manager, amongst the most successful, there has always been years and years of dues, struggles, humility and extraordinary efforts to translate their unique gift to the world. I can relate to and understand the OP to an extent but at some point, ffs, we have to pull it together and get a eyes wide open grip on the bigger picture.
Old 2 days ago
  #33
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneHall View Post
Exactly.
The top is bought and paid for and served up in dizzying flurry backed up by massive marketing budgets to the collective narcissistic populists far more interested in the branded celebrity profile attached to it, little to no regard whether or not any actual musical substance is obvious and in the mix (so to say). What I see on the charts is not indicative of musical prowess or great songwriting necessarily, in alarming disproportion. And celebrity is bought and paid for , music is just about numbers and without strong numbers, seems only incidental to the celebrity' branding campaign. I don't mean that to come off as cynical, rather it's really all I'm seeing , unless I want to participate in any delusions that would sway that observation. Above all, I believe now more than ever we as creators must be as true to ourselves as possible, come to terms with the hostile volatility of whatever semblance of music business remains in the realm of music, and just do what we do, for ourselves and our own truth.
I do understand the urge to quit and say there can be no possible ascension to a wider audience or capacity to be solely self sustaining with music, but that is a misnomer that is fueled by not having a realistic view of success actually is, and what that top tier is really all about or has become about.

Most of the younger artists coming into my world are from bucked up middle class families who have the money to throw at a childs desire, but sadly I also notice it is also a way in which these enabling parents avoid having a relationship/ or speak using their words with their kids.., and the perception of success that I hear back is similar to some of the core issues in this thread.., "if I can't be famous and rich than I am wasting my time". Very rare if ever do I hear anything like " How can I improve my abilities as an artist?". Pathetic and nauseating to know so many can only define themselves as artists by whether or they have attained celebrity status or seen as temporary greatness via some reality tv show contest ( for example). Maybe it has always been this way, I don't know, but in my years of experience working as everything from a production assistant to an artist manager, amongst the most successful, there has always been years and years of dues, struggles, humility and extraordinary efforts to translate their unique gift to the world. I can relate to and understand the OP to an extent but at some point, ffs, we have to pull it together and get a eyes wide open grip on the bigger picture.
Taylor Swift's folks bought her a label...
Old 2 days ago
  #34
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
Taylor Swift's folks bought her a label...
Well, her father bought a 3% interest in the label. Just as she was signed. That's the equivalent to buying her the deal, sure. Which is what lots of people do. Most of them, to no avail. Imagine how many banks would be happy to loan you $120,000 to make a record, because it's a sure bet that you will get a million-dollar career out of it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
At an industry showcase at Nashville's Bluebird Cafe in 2005, Swift caught the attention of Scott Borchetta, a DreamWorks Records executive who was preparing to form his own independent record label, Big Machine Records. She became one of the first signings, and her father purchased a three percent stake in the fledgling company at an estimated cost of $120,000.[31][32] The singer began working on her eponymous debut album shortly after signing the record deal. She persuaded Big Machine to hire her demo producer Nathan Chapman, with whom she felt she had the right "chemistry".[13] Swift wrote three of the album's songs alone, and co-wrote the remaining eight with writers Rose, Robert Ellis Orrall, Brian Maher, and Angelo Petraglia.[33] Taylor Swift was released on October 24, 2006.[34
$120,000: about the budget for a slick commercial album with the top Nashville people. That's enough $$ to make the record. Stories like this are popular in hindsight about the people for whom it worked. They give the impression that you can buy your way in. But omitted (because its boring) are the large numbers of people who put up similar dough and it did not work.

We all know that for every TS, there are thousands whose parents, husbands, boyfriends, whatever, sank small fortunes into having a record made and yet have nothing to show for it. People who mortgaged their family homes, blew their inheritances, etc. I know some of them personally. If some money was all it took, there would be 100 new "successful" artists every week. We wouldn't have the time to actually listen to their music. Or even learn all their names.

Most will fail to achieve that commercial success. That's just the reality.
Old 2 days ago
  #35
Lives for gear
 
JayTee4303's Avatar
For the record, I re-thought my earlier post, and while it has the tone I felt necessary, it overshot and the message was unlikely to make it thru, so I went to delete it, and the delete failed, several times. Onward.
Old 2 days ago
  #36
Find happiness, Goodbye
Old 2 days ago
  #37
Lives for gear
 
donsolo's Avatar
The beauty of music as a career is that in your 20s, everyone wants to get famous. It makes sense since fame = record sales to some extent. It's why acts like Radiohead or NIN can go it alone without a label and still make small fortunes.

The whole crowd sourcing thing works if you're already famous. If you're not, then that's not a viable option for you.

But, you don't need to sell 100,000 copies on your own to make good money. The beauty of the DIY thing is that you keep all of it after you make the initial investment back.

Where that goes wrong is thinking that spending $120,000 to hire the best players in the best room is going to help sell these copies. Newsflash: they won't.

Like, I don't mean to poo poo all over the system, but working with a name producer may generate some sales from their sycophant fans who collect everything they work on, but not enough to offset the cost of hiring that producer. But, there's that voice in the back of your head saying "If I work with them, they will make it a hit." Repeat for big-name mixers, mastering engineers, etc.

So, too many times I see guys who are going to sell 1,000 copies spending $8k on the album. Well, after you pay to make the album, and make copies, there's nothing left over from those 1,000 sales.

If you can keep your costs under control in the right way (don't hire subpar musicians and engineers, but you don't need household names) and spend say $1,000 to make your album without driving your engineer crazy (these projects tend to turn into a few very long days) then you've made $7,000 from the sales of that 1,000 (I factor 1k for recording, 2k for manufacturing) and now you're net positive.

The best part is you can turn around and spend twice as much on the next record (hopefully in promotion) and maybe instead of selling 1,000, this time you sell 2,000, and you've probably learned a lot of lessons about how to make things better with the same recording budget for the next time as well.

But, this is where your typical 20-something "I want to be famous" type gets turned off: how do you actually sell those 1,000? Gigs. You're going to have to book them, play them, and work hard for them. Some will pay ok, a couple will pay great, most will pay badly.

If you can sell 3 CDs a day, you're going to sell 1,000 over the course of a year. If you can sell 10 CDs per show, that means you need to gig twice a week to make that happen.

It's starting to sound like work, isn't it? Yeah...

It's not impossible to break into the full-time musician status, but it's a long road to getting 2 shows per week, and it's a longer road to get to 4-5 shows per week (40-50CDs sold per week, so 200/mo) which is 2,400 sold for a year.

But, if you're paying say $3000 to sell $24,000 worth of CDs, that's $21k you made that year after your costs, plus a lot of those gigs are paid, and all of a sudden you find yourself making something resembling a living. If those 5 shows a week pay say $50 and you keep selling, you're making $750/week as a musician.

But, the reality is that gigs don't fall into your lap unless you're famous so you've got to hustle to line them up.

We're not talking about lotto winner major label stuff here. You can make the CDs yourself at home with not a ton of equipment, you can book the gigs yourself, and you can play them, but it takes a lot of work, something that someone who is trying to get "famous" is averse to.
Old 2 days ago
  #38
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
Well, her father bought a 3% interest in the label. Just as she was signed. That's the equivalent to buying her the deal, sure. Which is what lots of people do. Most of them, to no avail. Imagine how many banks would be happy to loan you $120,000 to make a record, because it's a sure bet that you will get a million-dollar career out of it.




$120,000: about the budget for a slick commercial album with the top Nashville people. That's enough $$ to make the record. Stories like this are popular in hindsight about the people for whom it worked. They give the impression that you can buy your way in. But omitted (because its boring) are the large numbers of people who put up similar dough and it did not work.

We all know that for every TS, there are thousands whose parents, husbands, boyfriends, whatever, sank small fortunes into having a record made and yet have nothing to show for it. People who mortgaged their family homes, blew their inheritances, etc. I know some of them personally. If some money was all it took, there would be 100 new "successful" artists every week. We wouldn't have the time to actually listen to their music. Or even learn all their names.

Most will fail to achieve that commercial success. That's just the reality.
Swift was obviously quite motivated and while never got her appeal millions do! Besides, I'm the opposite of her demo.

Her folks buying 3% of her label is the cherry on the sundae. Bs he grew up with money and was encourage and supported by her folks... Who moved to Nashville to get her closer to the machine.

That level of support is awesome; however, it'd not make a difference if the kid was a musical nightmare and was ugly.

Looks ain't the only thing... In the 80s, 90s I worked as a session player/writer Plenty of "vanity projects"... Ugh. They're still here, though. Watch any of the Housewives of Orange County, New Jersey, etc... One of the cast always ends up doing a vanity project. What the hell, they have a captive audience.
Old 2 days ago
  #39
" Hopefully some of you guys still find the joy in making music."

Damn right!

Because of good intentions. Good feelings.

Not false hopes for non-existent perfection...or "success" in the eyes of everyone else but yourself.

So do not let others dictate your happiness. Do not let a "goal attainable" dictate your happiness.

Attaining Perfection is a silly dream for the Lost people of this world.....


Striving for perfection, is a gift...a joy....an art....a pleasure


While Understanding there is no such thing....it is priceless


If your music is not bringing you joy....yes, quit now...quit fast...just quit.



OR


maybe you could find the joy in it,


Since you KNOW there COULD Be joy in it, somewhere
Old 2 days ago
  #40
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
Swift was obviously quite motivated and while never got her appeal millions do! Besides, I'm the opposite of her demo.
oh same here, but I have seen her concerts and watched as every young girl in the place is singing along to every word of every song as if it was written about their own lives. I guess that's a talent, too.


Quote:
Her folks buying 3% of her label is the cherry on the sundae. Bs he grew up with money and was encourage and supported by her folks... Who moved to Nashville to get her closer to the machine.

That level of support is awesome; however, it'd not make a difference if the kid was a musical nightmare and was ugly.
exactly
and I would take it one step farther and say they could be good looking and talented but still miss because of 1000 different things they have no control over. Maybe they are just not as 'relatable'. Maybe they had the wrong timing. Maybe their record dropped on the same day as Beyonce's new album. Maybe a DJ played record A instead record B on a whim and a ball got rolling in a certain direction. Maybe they are too much like some other artist. Maybe they are ahead of their time. So many maybes. So many rolls of the dice.

What is inescapable is that there can only be so many people who are 'famous'. If everyone is famous, then no one is famous - they would all blend back into the general population. There are easily tens of millions of wannabees. If there was something that reliably "worked" - anything - be it buying a label, being good looking, sticking to your "dream", or even simply just "being talented" there would still be too many 'successes'. I am sure a cursory survey could find 100,000 good looking. talented people who are sticking to their dream.

Is there room for 100,000 "famous" musicians?

Not only does the industry prefer to concentrate its efforts on a smaller amount of huge artists rather than a larger amount of medium artists, the public too has a rather low saturation point for their Attention. And that point is probably in the dozens at the most for any given genre.

Dozens vs millions - clearly the default must be failure. Big time commercial success is the true anomaly.
Old 2 days ago
  #41
Lives for gear
 
noiseflaw's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothjazz View Post
get plenty of sunlight.
And perspective!

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothjazz View Post
get plenty of sunlight.
Would that you apply this figuratively too...

best.
Old 2 days ago
  #42
Lives for gear
 
GeneHall's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by donsolo View Post
The beauty of music as a career is that in your 20s, everyone wants to get famous. It makes sense since fame = record sales to some extent. It's why acts like Radiohead or NIN can go it alone without a label and still make small fortunes.

The whole crowd sourcing thing works if you're already famous. If you're not, then that's not a viable option for you.

But, you don't need to sell 100,000 copies on your own to make good money. The beauty of the DIY thing is that you keep all of it after you make the initial investment back.

Where that goes wrong is thinking that spending $120,000 to hire the best players in the best room is going to help sell these copies. Newsflash: they won't.

Like, I don't mean to poo poo all over the system, but working with a name producer may generate some sales from their sycophant fans who collect everything they work on, but not enough to offset the cost of hiring that producer. But, there's that voice in the back of your head saying "If I work with them, they will make it a hit." Repeat for big-name mixers, mastering engineers, etc.

So, too many times I see guys who are going to sell 1,000 copies spending $8k on the album. Well, after you pay to make the album, and make copies, there's nothing left over from those 1,000 sales.

If you can keep your costs under control in the right way (don't hire subpar musicians and engineers, but you don't need household names) and spend say $1,000 to make your album without driving your engineer crazy (these projects tend to turn into a few very long days) then you've made $7,000 from the sales of that 1,000 (I factor 1k for recording, 2k for manufacturing) and now you're net positive.

The best part is you can turn around and spend twice as much on the next record (hopefully in promotion) and maybe instead of selling 1,000, this time you sell 2,000, and you've probably learned a lot of lessons about how to make things better with the same recording budget for the next time as well.

But, this is where your typical 20-something "I want to be famous" type gets turned off: how do you actually sell those 1,000? Gigs. You're going to have to book them, play them, and work hard for them. Some will pay ok, a couple will pay great, most will pay badly.

If you can sell 3 CDs a day, you're going to sell 1,000 over the course of a year. If you can sell 10 CDs per show, that means you need to gig twice a week to make that happen.

It's starting to sound like work, isn't it? Yeah...

It's not impossible to break into the full-time musician status, but it's a long road to getting 2 shows per week, and it's a longer road to get to 4-5 shows per week (40-50CDs sold per week, so 200/mo) which is 2,400 sold for a year.

But, if you're paying say $3000 to sell $24,000 worth of CDs, that's $21k you made that year after your costs, plus a lot of those gigs are paid, and all of a sudden you find yourself making something resembling a living. If those 5 shows a week pay say $50 and you keep selling, you're making $750/week as a musician.

But, the reality is that gigs don't fall into your lap unless you're famous so you've got to hustle to line them up.

We're not talking about lotto winner major label stuff here. You can make the CDs yourself at home with not a ton of equipment, you can book the gigs yourself, and you can play them, but it takes a lot of work, something that someone who is trying to get "famous" is averse to.
This is exactly right. My partner and I finally found a niche by forging our own path. It has and will most likely never lead to any sort of "fame" or even noteriety but nonetheless, it has enabled us in the long run, but each project seems to lead to another and so on..
After 2 label releases went absolutely nowhere, and a 3rd solo self produced effort only managed to generate debt, we had to wise up. It all came down to finding our personal happiness in what we do with our lives .
With the 4th effort, we embarked down a path that I'm certain most would look their nose down but it worked well for us and without the internet, a label or a huge marketing budget, we managed to sell just over 14,000 CD's at 15-20 bucks a pop, over the course of 15 months.
It meant standing there to close each sale following a live performance as sort of busker of types, but much more . It was a rough start but we started learning about council rules regarding temporary live installations and positively exploiting the opportunity to work for us. An artist named Passenger also did this and in his case, he has gone on to secure a cult following that will probably endure throughout his life. In our case, we chose to b uy a home and build a decent home studio to learn how to start making our own records. We are only just now starting to see the returns of our investment and efforts pay off in the form of our personal happiness and a huge sense of achievement that we would never have experienced if we had handed the lollies off to someone else and took another chance with an outside producer really only interested in their own interests. Not that that is a problem but we could not afford the time, money or potential for another effort obscured by a 3rd party. I think for really good songwriters, it's a very great risk to have a solid vision and then hand it off to someone who may or may not have the the same interests at heart. Our preservation as artists would fall solely to us and while there are times that I look at artists like Ms Swift and think that 120k is getting off really light, we knew the business of music was floundering and tightening it's focus and efforts/cash on the few , the marketable, and those artists which also serve to support the infrastructure of the systems/people already in place. At the time, I was working for an artist who was on the EMI label and at a time when the whole business went pear shaped, swiftly capsizing, no one could find their own arse with both hands all the while this once remarkable company was ravaged [gutted destroyed] by it's current non musical owners . An extraordinary amount of recognisable established artists around the world were suddenly, homeless in a manner of speaking.
Though we started out wanting to write and release and tour our own work, we wound up finding a lot of satisfaction and sustainability in being contributors to others efforts, writing string parts, helping with harmonic structure, writing bridges, guitar parts, vocals, etc and whatever, sans the stress and pressure of also conjuring under funded marketing schemes we knew we would be throwing money into the void any way.
But we were and are still making music and still quite happy with our choices. It really meant letting go of preconceived notions of "success" and filtering out the raging persistent superficiality of an industry ( not the business of music) with a widened platform of the internet giving a cyber outlet for any one and everyone who could string together a cover song. And even in that , we found a stream of income in putting together backing tracks for a string of delusional self absorbed singers whose greatest hope was to find stardom on some reality tv talent show. Not our finest hour but we learned to keep our opinions to ourselves and contribute our little bit in service of their plight and cause. Not a great living but we still manage a cafe life style and keep the lights on. Happy as. Never what we expected but we realised when we stopped trying to force our preconceived expectations and adapted to what was really happening around us, we found peace and sustainability in our small world. Another thing I have learned over the years is that everyone, everywhere having even the slightest role in music is quite insane ( not a bad form of.. but still ) and it is of paramount importance that we find people who share in a particular shared version of insanity that is productive and sustaining. Anyone in this business who does not think that they are insane is either a well behaved work - in- progress or lying to themselves. And the types that pride themselves on being the most highly of "professionals", are actually just really reliably and behaviorally predictable ( see: boring), which is critical to opportunity but yea, is what it is. I would argue that music related people are the most intelligent and sophisticated, highly organised nutters on the planet. Like scientists but even more OCD.
Whether any one agrees with me or not does not matter, I mention this only because at the core of it all, is personal well being and acceptance of oneself above all else. Whether it's music or carpentry or wrapping fish or boat building, we must find a way to accept and respect ourselves if we are to find a path that allows us to define ourselves and embrace our highest most true form. I really believe music makers have no real choice, music decides whether you belong or not, we either listen to that internal voice or we suppress it and go on about leading a miserable lackluster uneventful existence void of depth or personal meaning. The OP's whole notion of I'm just gonna "quit" ****s me to no end and for whatever reasons or circumstances that have led him to air this unhealthy self deprecated thought process, my contribution to this thread is only to lend another voice to the echoing message of so many others who have lived through and persevered in making their music and their living via the only thing that might come naturally to them. At 23, quitting anything is a dangerous endeavor that can lead to a pattern of.. quitting. I know plenty of professional quitters and they are all very effective at quitting because they have had so much practice at it.
I remember having an fortunate experience around the OP's age and I had very profound life changing conversation with a gentleman named Michael Been ( The Call, BRMC) that really put many things into perspective for me. Though Michael sadly is no longer with us, his voice of reasoning at a critical time in my personal development has stuck with me to this day, and every chance I get to repay that universal message extended to me, I will go on this very rant. I'll post this rant with a certain amount of cringe factor, I know how easily ones intentions can be twisted around on them here in a forum..but yea, **** it.

Last edited by GeneHall; 1 day ago at 08:00 AM.. Reason: incoherent bamble ****e
Old 1 day ago
  #43
I sense a lot of bitterness in this post.

The music business is difficult to break into. And the only thing harder than getting into the music business is staying in the music business.

So cheer up and have a go at it. If it doesn't work, it doesn't work. There is no reason to feel defeated and to tear down others who are working to succeed.
Old 1 day ago
  #44
Lives for gear
 
boombapdame's Avatar
 

Old 1 day ago
  #45
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
Swift was obviously quite motivated and while never got her appeal millions do! Besides, I'm the opposite of her demo.

Her folks buying 3% of her label is the cherry on the sundae. Bs he grew up with money and was encourage and supported by her folks... Who moved to Nashville to get her closer to the machine.

That level of support is awesome; however, it'd not make a difference if the kid was a musical nightmare and was ugly.

Looks ain't the only thing... In the 80s, 90s I worked as a session player/writer Plenty of "vanity projects"... Ugh. They're still here, though. Watch any of the Housewives of Orange County, New Jersey, etc... One of the cast always ends up doing a vanity project. What the hell, they have a captive audience.
It also doesn't hurt that she has real talent. Sometimes it seems like there's something that pushes mediocrity and suppresses talent. I know that's not fair to the vast majority of people who get even a little attention, but sometimes it's hard to understand the appeal. But in her case, I can't begrudge her any of her success.
Old 15 hours ago
  #46
Lives for gear
 
GeneHall's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
It also doesn't hurt that she has real talent. Sometimes it seems like there's something that pushes mediocrity and suppresses talent. I know that's not fair to the vast majority of people who get even a little attention, but sometimes it's hard to understand the appeal. But in her case, I can't begrudge her any of her success.
Ms Swift does have a genuine talent and for millions of young music listeners she is the benchmark of modern greatness. Whatever cringe factor older or more refined listeners may feel towards her [music], and artists like her, is probably as much or more to do with the gentrification of the music business. The heartfelt sincerity of an advantaged person is remarkably different to the noticeably different genuineness of a struggling artist/writer who battles through each and everyday of their life to arrive at their personal artistic expression. I think the arguable superficiality of some mass marketed music presented as being of profound depth is gauged to a different audience, unaware or uncaring that their version of depth might seem highly underdeveloped or immature to a listener with more experience in years. Where once the opportunity may have been available to the less fortunate or less enabled budding artist, it is certainly not the case today, access fame and super stardom is, or seems reserved for the affluent. Not so much simply because a parent or family can afford to back a career getting off the ground, but also a collective unwillingness on the part of labels to take any/very few risks on anything profound that might challenge the stream lined status quo. No one is going to risk their very secure station and income at a job for the sake of art, for vanity and ego maybe, but not for art. So the less affluent - least enabled artist is on their own and up against epic odds to challenge this.
This is not a grievance on my part but merely an observation when surveying the terrain and trying to understand as much as possible about mass marketed music today and what listeners are regarding as great.
Art and the artist must see past the veneer and illusion of great fame, avoid sacrificing ones every effort to live in envy and jealousy of something that has little to do with be a creator and wanting to live a life immersed and sustained in creativity. Most of the art, music and artists I am personally fond of were all products of reflecting a life of hardship, endurance rarely interrupted by extended periods of prolonged happiness or comfort with their finest efforts all seeming to manifested during their darkest of hours where I can only imagine it was their strength of character and trust in themselves that helped get those creations to their finished stage. Ironically, those same creators , including the ones I would come to know first hand in my life, all seemed to look at their fame with a certain level of embarrassment and humility. And those dark times that were fodder to their most regarded works, are in their unique terms, "the good old days". An artist who has lived a life with little discomfort and every advantage can never fully appreciate or even come close to emulating the raw depth of those that struggled to create. I think so long as we are alive, and we have the even the remotest ability to create, to make music, to write..then we should instead of complaining aloud about all that we as creators don't have, we should be writing and translating those feelings through music.., for ourselves for those listeners who may only ever have the music in their lives to relate to.
Quitting just seems such a waste.

Last edited by GeneHall; 12 hours ago at 10:19 AM..
Old 1 hour ago
  #47
Lives for gear
 
donsolo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
@donsolo I'd take #2 and #3 over #1 anytime.
I see where you're coming from, and there's truly nothing wrong with it. But, I'm sure you can appreciate that OP may be interested in becoming a 1, as I am.

IMO if you're in category 2 and not trying to get to category 1, you're a category 3 that happens to make a few bucks in the process.

I've been playing gigs that pay $150/guy lately and if I could figure out how to do that daily, I'd happily leave the day job. At 5 days a week, that's not far off of what I make at the day job and the difference would be made up in things like merch sales.

But, I'm also a guy who will do 3 shows a day if I can.

That's the only real upside as a jazz musician. Because it's so institutionalized and because I can basically play every other style of music on demand, I can possibly string together a full time career out of it. That being said, I have no illusions of getting past the weekend warrior status, but goals are goals and we need to work towards our goals. It's good that you don't share the same goal because there's still room for everyone.
Loading mentioned products ...
New Reply Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook  Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter  Submit Thread to LinkedIn LinkedIn  Submit Thread to Google+ Google+  Submit Thread to Reddit Reddit 
 
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get instant access to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump