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Mastering frequencies? Studio Monitors
Old 16th September 2011
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Mastering frequencies?

hi , guys!
i'm gonna ask you one important question to me, that is chasing me from years...

I work with magix samplitude for mix & master. i've watched timbaland's mixes, sctorch's mixes any hit's mix and when look at the spectrum (set to show me average freqs, not peaks, at med speed) i see all that songs sound great, clear and loud, but in mixes i see frequency dips... dips araound 300hz and 5khz...i know that definition for 300hz is MUDDY, and 5khz is presense, but what i'v noticed is that other people masters sound like their 300hz and 5khz are cut or compressed and gained down seriously... is it right what i hear and think?
i work with krk rokit8, i work also in a bar, where we play with cerwin vega... and always these vegas "show" me differences in that freqs between my masters and other people's ones...
i read about the ear' frequency responce, about the spls and loudness levels, but the real question for me is : do i have to be careful with these freq in the mix, or i have to do the mix and then in the master to compress these freqs, or cut with linphase eq (i work with software :( )
thanks in advance!
Old 16th September 2011
  #2
Gear Head
 

Batepesho -

There are really no rules! Nobody does anything all the time. If a mix or mastering engineer thinks a mix sounds muddy, they might look for that frequency and reduce it with EQ. If they don't think it sounds muddy, they won't. It's all about your ears, what YOU think sounds great, on a mix by mix basis. Asking if 300hz is always reduced in a good mix is like asking if a painter always starts with the color blue.

A muddy mix is often caused by the mix engineer not being careful enough that the various tracks are not stepping on each other, during mixdown.
Old 16th September 2011
  #3
Here for the gear
 

summing freqs make reso on some freqs... incorrect eq-ing , or missed eq on some tracks could do that mud... i guess
Old 16th September 2011
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Mud is most often caused by subsonic content not noticed by the mix and master engineers, and which subsequently gets slammed into a limiter. So the best thing you can do is USE A SUBWOOFER while monitoring. Those Cerwin Vegas in the bar should do the job nicely and also give you an idea of how your song will sound in a typical venue, but you should also have a sub at home so you can judge for yourself.

Most nearfield monitors start rolling off at 60Hz. Having a system that is flat to 20Hz is tough (i have a system that absolutely blasts at 20Hz, but has a big hole from 25 to 40Hz), but having a system that is flat to 35-40Hz will give you a totally new impression on the music you are working on. While the midrange is the most important for the vast majority of consumer audio equipment, the control of the low end becomes crucial if your track needs to really pound in a club.
Old 18th September 2011
  #5
Here for the gear
 

really thankyou, unique!
i work mostly on hiphop and pop music. here in bulgaria, in our popfolk music, mastering levels are very high (for me) -8dbfs rms, loudness -9, -10 and the dynamic range is almost destroyed, but still sound good and crystal clear (i talk about the best masters in out country)... When i went to the store to buy monitors, i was planning to buy and a sub, but i didnt, when i listened to these rokit8s...everyday i have to work with subbass - 40-70hz, i think you know how's it in the hiphop, and i'm tryin do my best with what i have...the studio is small and i plan when we can offer bigger rooms, to get main monitors, sub and so on...
thanks again!
Old 18th September 2011
  #6
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by batepesho View Post
really thankyou, unique!
i work mostly on hiphop and pop music. here in bulgaria, in our popfolk music, mastering levels are very high
Well, i'm just around the corner so i know how it is. I've been to Bulgaria, but i haven't worked there. But the levels thing is the same here... and while everyone else has started to back off just a tad, things seem to be going worse in here. You know how we always are several years behind the wave...

Quote:
Originally Posted by batepesho View Post
everyday i have to work with subbass - 40-70hz, i think you know how's it in the hiphop, and i'm tryin do my best with what i have...the studio is small and i plan when we can offer bigger rooms, to get main monitors, sub and so on...
thanks again!
If you work hiphop you really should have a sub. The rokit 8 monitors say they're flat to 45Hz, and that's good enough for pop and dance but not for hiphop. I'd be careful about those 808 bassdrums with those monitors. So also check with headphones, in the car, in the club.
Old 18th September 2011
  #7
try this tip
(sorry for my english)

in samplitude make a submix bus at the end (maybe with a compresor with light settings to reduce only 2-3 db, like "the glue" before send all to master chain.

master chain with no equalizers plizzz . . . only limiter and multiband from samplitude and one freq analyzer (post fader vst and advanced dinamics) i like frequalizer fron roger nichols.

then put in the bus a file wave/mp3 with pink noise , another with your favourite songs.

put FFT after this compresor, and select each file and click on LEARN and save like presets "noise" "Heavy" "pop"

delete files in the bus

put your song sending to this bus and select chorus (or the most important part of the song) and select the presets.

i like to use signal from pink noise and low the level to 70%, (maybe need a little manual touch in highs )

and voila . . . you have a start point to make a new mix , and when you have a new mix, again go to fft and select the same . . . in 3 or 4 minimixes you have a very similar sound to other bands.

then put on visulaization with rms window

push multibands to reach -10 db of rms
and you have a new start point to make a good master.

if you have distorted sound, then you have a bad mix, maybe lots of transients with no control . . . put mexoscope vst in some chanels and see the transients, if you have lots, put compresors here and there to make a soft signal before mastering . . . a very glued mix, very good balanced is the most important.
Take car of sub-bass region.
If you need more control, you can put a good compresor in mastering, like alpha master, and cut transients with clipper, and make a soft mix . . .

hope this help you
Old 19th September 2011
  #8
Gear Addict
 

Another few tips on things that might have bass but shouldn't, especially if you're working with samples:

Hihats: highpass at around 160Hz, if not even higher.
Snares and percussion: Highpass at around 80Hz.
Reverb without a low cut can also be troublesome.

A highpass filter applied to the whole mix, at the mastering stage, can actually make the limiter work harder and make it sound worse. So it is best that the frequency balance is correct in the mix.

This of course applies when you are the mixing engineer, but even if you're the mastering engineer you should communicate with the guy who did the mixing if you feel the mix sounds muddy.
Old 19th September 2011
  #9
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huejahfink's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Th3_uN1Qu3 View Post
Hihats: highpass at around 160Hz, if not even higher.
Snares and percussion: Highpass at around 80Hz.
Well that all depends on the type of sound that you are going for doesn't it?
Not saying that this isn't potentially good advice, but there are times where settings such as these might make a mix a bit overly sterile especially if you are going for a really natural sound on those drums for instance.
Old 19th September 2011
  #10
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by huejahfink View Post
Not saying that this isn't potentially good advice, but there are times where settings such as these might make a mix a bit overly sterile especially if you are going for a really natural sound on those drums for instance.
I was talking specifically about samples, which may have unwanted frequencies accidentally present. When you're recording a live drumkit, if you need highpass, you apply it in the mixer for that particular mike, else you just leave it be.
Old 19th September 2011
  #11
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huejahfink's Avatar
 

Verified Member
In which case I would be more inclined to clean up the samples before they get programmed into the arrangement, rather than to try to clean up 'the mess' afterwards. To each their own tho'.....

Of course, if you end up doing stuff with pitching (particularly pitching down a considerable amount) then I def' agree with you about a high-pass filter on the channel just to catch any subsonic nonsense.
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