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Brick limiters vs regular Limiters Dynamics Plugins
Old 10th February 2010
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Brick limiters vs regular Limiters

Was wondering what the difference between a "brick limiter" and a "regular limiter" is.

I know that a brickwall limiter prevents ANYTHING from going over the set output, but does this mean that the regular limiter once in a while lets some transients pass through?

What is the typical one to use as a last insert on my 2 bus in my DAW?

And why even create a Limiter plugin thats NOT brickwall? Whats the benefit?



Is there any wiz out there who knows the difference?

Many thanks for any help here!


/R
Old 10th February 2010
  #2
Lives for gear
 
hazelmossobrien's Avatar
 

Yes a brick wall limiter can be set to allow nothing to pass the set threshold. A regular limiter will be more forgiving and allow (depending how you set it's parameters) transients to kiss past the threshold.

A brick wall limiter, to me, has it's benefits in live situations. Live sound engineers often strap a brick wall limiter over their mixes to protect from sharp unexpected spikes, like a dropped microphone, from blowing their speakers or (or damaging ears!). Radio broadcasts also use brick wall limiters for the same reason, and to ensure the sound never gets louder past a certain threshold. There are strict laws that radio broadcasts can't be loud past a certain point, and likely there are steep fines, hence the absolute necessity of a brick wall limiter.

I don't do mastering, but I doubt brick wall limiters are used often in mastering. Maybe a mastering engineer can chime in?
Old 10th February 2010
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelmossobrien View Post
Yes a brick wall limiter can be set to allow nothing to pass the set threshold. A regular limiter will be more forgiving and allow (depending how you set it's parameters) transients to kiss past the threshold.

A brick wall limiter, to me, has it's benefits in live situations. Live sound engineers often strap a brick wall limiter over their mixes to protect from sharp unexpected spikes, like a dropped microphone, from blowing their speakers or (or damaging ears!). Radio broadcasts also use brick wall limiters for the same reason, and to ensure the sound never gets louder past a certain threshold. There are strict laws that radio broadcasts can never be louder past a certain point, and likely there are steep fines, hence the absolute necessity of a brick wall limiter.

I don't do mastering, but I doubt brick wall limiters are used often in mastering. Maybe a mastering engineer can chime in?
Thanks for the input. I was more thinking in the digital domain though.

/R
Old 11th February 2010
  #4
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Adam Dempsey's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quick reply..
Typically, a digital "brick wall" limiter has a ratio of infinity: 1, and will use a look-ahead delay to analyze & process peak transients with extremely fast attack and release, relative to that of a compressor.
In general audio terms a "limiter", especially in the analog realm, may be known to have a ratio greater than 10:1. Many broadcast limiters were valve designs, though definitely not "brick wall".
I'm sure if you try a Search for "peak limiter" or "brick wall limiter" you'll get more detailed info.
Old 11th February 2010
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Dempsey View Post
Quick reply..
Typically, a digital "brick wall" limiter has a ratio of infinity: 1, and will use a look-ahead delay to analyze & process peak transients with extremely fast attack and release, relative to that of a compressor.
In general audio terms a "limiter", especially in the analog realm, may be known to have a ratio greater than 10:1. Many broadcast limiters were valve designs, though definitely not "brick wall".
I'm sure if you try a Search for "peak limiter" or "brick wall limiter" you'll get more detailed info.
thanks for the info!!

/R
Old 12th February 2010
  #6
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wado1942's Avatar
 

One more note, brickwall limiters often turn down the level BEFORE a spike which is made possible by the look-ahead delay. A normal limiter does not have look-ahead and thus a period of time can pass before clamping down on the signal.
Old 14th February 2010
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelmossobrien View Post
I don't do mastering, but I doubt brick wall limiters are used often in mastering. Maybe a mastering engineer can chime in?
Actually it's become a must for commercial stuff
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