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Summit Audio EQ-200 Review - Analog EQ With Digital Control
Old 27th May 2009
  #1
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Summit Audio EQ-200 Review - Analog EQ With Digital Control



Picture © 2009 Holger Lagerfeldt, not to be used without permission. The EQ-200 is in the middle of the photo, sitting right above the Crane Song STC-8/M.


Summit Audio EQ-200 Review

Pros
· Sounds clean, pleasant and detailed
· Unparalleled flexibility and workflow for an analog equalizer
· True stereo control, digital recall, and A/B comparison feature
· Full range of equalizers: HPF, LPF, parametric bands, low and high shelf

Cons
· Not suitable for extreme surgical cuts
· Built-in fan, though it is small, slow and low noise

Summary Of Features
· Analog design by Mr. Rupert Neve
· Class A solid state
· Digital control of all functions
· True stereo control or dual mono
· Recall and user presets
· A/B comparison feature
· MIDI or TDM plug-in controllable
· 2 flexible LPF or HPF filters
· 4 bands of parametric EQ
· Low and high shelf EQ (swappable for low and high band of parametric EQ)
· Coarse and fine gain settings

Background Of This Review
I was looking for an alternative unit to complement my Gyraf G14 Parallel Passive Tube Equalizer and Flux Epure II digital equalizer. In my mastering workflow I prefer to work with stereo controllable equalizers if possible, so I was looking for a true stereo linked, solid-state, mastering quality equalizer.

Appearance And Feel
The Summit Audio EQ-200 is quite a looker with its shiny anodized metal frontplate and an intriguing interface design. The original official packshot shows it in a blue shade, but it is in fact a highly reflective metal surface.

At 27 pounds it is heavy machinery, but that comes as no surprise considering how much functionality and quality Mr. Neve and Summit have managed to cram into this 2 unit machine.

Apart from a power cord and rack screws, a concise 22 page manual as well as a stapled 4 page quick start guide are included in the box. A MIDI implementation chart for SysEx and CC codes can be requested from Summit Audio by email.

Front Panel Quick Overview
The front consist of 6 sections: the input and filter section, 4 equalizer sections, and the master output and preset section. The input and output sections each have a LED display which doubles as a button, and one digital rotary encoder. Each equalizer section also has a LED button, and two rotary encoders for gain and frequency respectively. The frequency encoder controls bandwidth when toggled.

The square LED buttons have a quality cushioned feel to them, and change status color when pushed. The text in the displays has good contrast and is easy to read, even for a myopic like myself.

The rotary encoders initially look more plastic-ey and light but feel reassuringly comfortable when turned. They let off very discrete muffled clicks as they rotate through the steps, and the small orange indicator light follows the movement in the outer ring of the knob.

Filter Section
The EQ-200 has two very flexible filters. Each can work as a 12dB/Octave high-pass or low-pass filter. This means you can have a HPF and a LPF at the same time or you can stack two filters of the same kind for a steeper 24dB/Octave slope. Since the filters are completely independent you can even have two filters of the same kind at two different frequencies.

High-pass filter
The HPF sounds smooth and natural in the 20 to 80 Hz range, where it will see most action during mastering. There is no weird phase shift and there is no noticeable filter ringing. Above 80 Hz the HPF itself becomes increasingly audible, though I attribute this to the unavoidable increase in perception of the filter ringing in most equalizers at higher HPF frequency settings.

Low-pass filter
Since I am not a big fan of low-pass filtering in mastering, I was pleasantly surprised by the smooth high end dampening qualities of the higher settings in the LPF. It can be set from 30 kHz and down, not just the 20 kHz maximum setting you often find. This extended range enables you to control the cutoff point around the Nyquist frequency more precisely or with greater subtlety. The 18 kHz setting worked well on a mix with a brittle and “digital” high end; the LPF instead keeping the top end smooth and natural.

Since the LPF can be combined with boosting the high parametric or more likely the high shelf, the LPF in the EQ-200 is definitely an option to consider once in a while when aiming for an open but rounded top end.

Filter frequencies
The HPF cutoff frequency ranges from 20 Hz to 320 Hz in the following steps:
Off, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 95, 115, 135, 160, 190, 225, 270, 320 (Hz)

The LPF cutoff frequency ranges from 30 kHz to 4 kHz in the following steps:
Off, 30, 26, 23, 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 11, 10, 8.7, 7.6, 6.6, 5.8, 5.1, 4.5, 4 (kHz)

Parametric And Shelving Bands
The EQ-200 offers a choice of 4 bands of peak/parametric equalizers: Low, Low Mid, High Mid, High. The low and high bands can be swapped for a low or high shelf respectively, and all bands have plenty of frequency overlap.

Gain
All bands provide you with -16 dB to +16 dB of gain in 2 dB or 0.5 dB increments. You toggle between coarse and fine gain mode by clicking the gain knob. The coarse/fine setting is remembered as long as the unit is on but it is reset to coarse when shut down.

Low peak/shelving
The low band peaking filter ranges from 30 Hz to 300 Hz and has a fixed bandwidth of Q=1.1, which makes it a quasi-parametric. The low peak equalizer is great for adding or subtracting bass in a particular area, but it is not effective in removing a narrow resonance problem. The fixed bandwidth in the low band is a limitation but it’s part of a valuable tradeoff: It gives you the option of swapping the peak equalizer for a low shelf equalizer.

The low shelf equalizer operates in the same frequency area (30 to 300 Hz) and sounds very good. The EQ-200 is generally a clean unit in all respects but the shelving equalizers have slightly more color to them than the rest of the bands. I found that the subtle coloration made the low shelf effective in enhancing the “oomph” even at moderate settings of +1.5 dB or less.

Low mid parametric
The low mid band is a parametric equalizer with adjustable bandwidth. The frequency area ranges from 100 Hz to 1 kHz with the bandwidth adjustment ranging from Q=0.60 to Q=2. The narrowest bandwidth of half an octave is more than adequate for most cuts but it will not act as an extreme surgical tool. I found the low mid band perfect for finding and carving out common resonance problems in the 150 - 800 Hz area.

By default the frequency knob controls the frequency. The selected frequency is shown in the LED button as well as being indicated by the orange light in the ring around the knob. Clicking the frequency knob toggles to bandwidth control (Q). The LED button now shows the Q value but the frequency is still shown in the frequency ring. Gain amount is always controllable and is displayed in both the LED button and in the ring around the gain knob at all times.

High mid parametric
The high mid band is also a parametric equalizer with adjustable bandwidth. It ranges from 500 Hz to 5 kHz with identical bandwidth options to the low mid band. Just like the low mid it sounds great for both cutting and boosting, always pleasant and effective, especially in bringing forward lead vocals - or pulling back harsh ones. The available steps will suffice in most situations or alternative frequencies can be reached via the high band peak equalizer via the overlapping frequency range, but you are likely using the high band for something else already.

High peak/shelving
The high band ranges from 2 kHz to 20 kHz, and similar to the low band you have a choice of either peak or shelving EQ. The high shelf equalizer works well with very gentle gain settings of +0.5 dB or +1 dB, lifting the high end in a subtle and agreeable manner. As is the case with the the low shelf, it is clear that the high shelf in the EQ-200 is different to its often lifeless generic digital counterpart, instead sounding detailed and wide.

Frequency ranges
The low band peak/shelving ranges from 30 Hz to 300 Hz in the following steps:
30, 35, 40, 46, 53, 61, 70, 82, 95, 110, 125, 145, 1750, 195, 220, 260, 300 (Hz)

The low mid band parametric ranges from 100 Hz to 1 kHz in the following steps:
100, 115, 135, 160, 180, 200, 235, 275, 315, 365, 420, 480, 560, 650, 750, 870, 1000 (Hz)

The high mid band parametric ranges from 500 Hz to 5 kHz in the following steps:
500, 580, 670, 770, 890 (Hz), 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.k, 2.1, 2.4, 2.8, 3.2, 3.8, 4.3, 5 (kHz)

The high band peak/shelving ranges from 2 kHz to 20 kHz in the following steps:
2, 2.3, 2.7, 3.0, 3.6, 4.1, 4.7, 5.5, 6.3, 7.3, 8.5, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20 (kHz)

Bandwidth
Q is adjustable in the low mid and high mid parametric bands from Q=0.60 to Q=2. Rotating through the following settings is a fluid experience:

0.60, 0.65, 0.70, 0.75, 0.81, 0.87, 0.94, 1.0, 1.1 (default), 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, 2.0 (Q)

Operation And Interface
Using the EQ-200 is easy and intuitive, in fact I predicted most of the controls without reading the manual first. However, I advice you read the part in the manual about switching and locking presets.

True Stereo Or Dual Mono Control
The overall functionality is quite amazing for an analog equalizer. Having true stereo operation in an analog equalizer not only gives you completely accurate left/right settings but it can speed up the workflow significantly. And you still have the choice of working in dual mono to address frequency imbalances in the stereo image.

Recall, Presets, And A/B Compare
The EQ-200 is 100% digitally controlled which means you get full and accurate recall, 25 user presets, easy A/B comparison of presets, and MIDI or TDM plug-in automation or control. A/B’ing of presets is brilliantly conceived: Double clicking the master rotary encoder automatically switches between the current and previously loaded preset. Presets switch instantly and without artifacts.

Working With Presets
There is no need to store presets. Any adjustment you make to a preset is saved in real-time unless the preset is locked. When a preset is locked any changes you make still take place but they will reset if you switch off the unit or switch to another preset.

Another benefit of having presets is being able to use your own favorite default settings as a starting point, and naturally it makes it possible to do old-skool mastering on-the-fly equalizer adjustments between segments without worrying about shaky hands.

The inability to copy presets is a minor disappointment though, especially when you want to use the A/B function. Instead you have to manually dial in the alternative preset first - which in all fairness only takes about 15 seconds. You quickly come to expect all the things associated with a plug-in equalizer when working with the EQ-200!

Bypassing
You can bypass each band individually by pushing the associated LED button once. This switches the color to amber and changes the channel select symbol in the display. You can bypass all 4 equalizer bands at the same time by holding the master LED button and pushing any band LED button.

Bypassing can as expected sometimes yield a small sound. For critical automation purposes it is however possible to get a completely silent bypass by making a preset with all bands active but with zero gain. Then you A/B or automate a preset switch. Since the EQ-200 is clean and flat even with all bands are engaged, it can almost sit permanently in your chain without much to worry about.

For some design reason the filter section is not bypassed when using the master bypass function. A minor irritation but fortunately the above preset switching work-around will take care of this too.

Automating the gain knobs during a pass can result in very, very low and muffled clicks in the audio chain as also known from equalizers with kobs using real switches instead of physically detented pots. Fortunately the clicks do not contain sub or high frequencies and will not be audible at all during normal use. It could be an issue if you are automating gain during a very low volume and soft sounding solo instrument or acapella passage with absolutely no transient masking, in which case you have to make separate passes and splice later.

Bonus Info
The EQ-200 has lots of small and well thought out touches. Not only does it have a grade A audio chain by Rupert Neve but it is evident that great care has been put into designing a user friendly interface, currently in its 2.23 version.

The input section shows a small input peak meter, and in identical manner to the master section, it will flash red 3 dB before overloading the +21 dBu input. The input section also controls L/R polarity and MIDI ID.

The master section also has a peak meter, showing the output of course. The master section equalizer gain trim (+/- 16 dB of gain) actually occurs prior to the equalizer modules.

The master section also has what Summit terms an “output fader”. It offers the possibility of doing an analog fade out approximating a standard fader curve with -20 dB occurring mid scale, according to the manual. In real life I find little use for this function but since it can be automated and even unlinked someone, somewhere may find it useful.

Another somewhat superfluous feature: Installing an internal jumper can kick up the potential output from the standard +21 dBu to +28 dBu.

The unit can be turned off completely on the back only but you can put it into sleep mode from the front panel.

Conclusion
I think that the Summit Audio EQ-200 is a hidden gem, especially for mastering. Considering the amazing sonics, excellent technical specifications, true stereo control and recallability there is simply no reason for this unit not to live side by side with another high quality analog mastering equalizer or in combination with a digital/plug-in equalizer.

Perhaps the explanation for its lack of market penetration into the mastering world is to be found in its origin: it was originally designed as part of the TEC Award winning MPE-200 preamp/equalizer. A no-compromise unit which Mr. Rupert Neve considered his best work at the time.

The sound is clean and detailed, yet pleasant with the extra width and depth perception associated with good sounding analog. It has the lowest self-noise in my gear park and is extremely flat with all bands engaged without gain. The interface is ingenious and very intuitive to use, and the whole unit simply oozes no-compromise design.

I paid the equivalent of USD $6,083 including shipping and taxes in Denmark. The price is cheaper in the US, about USD $4,000-$4,500, so all things considered it is an absolute bargain for mastering.

Communication and support from Summit Audio have been top-notch at all times, something I really appreciate as a professional customer.

Summit Audio Makers of fine Pro Audio Gear (soon opening with a new website)

I plan to include some audio clips soon.
Old 27th May 2009
  #2
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ONDRAY's Avatar
thx for sticking to it, this is a great review. I
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #3
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Ben F's Avatar
 

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1 Review written
Very detailed and concise review. I'd never really given this EQ the time of day until reading this. I wonder how it compares sonically with Rupert Neves other mastering EQ, the Focusrite Blue?
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #4
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Gr8 review and nice photo as well. I'm also looking forward to hearing the sonic samples.

Cheers & Beers

bcg
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #5
Gear Nut
 

This looks really cool!

Does it have any communication with the DAW? Or how do you operate the recall data?

I mean, the whole idea with a digital controlled analog equipment should be that the settings would be stored in the DAW-project. This could be done if it had a (control-)plugin connected to it; you could control it by either the plugin or the knobs and the entire setting would be stored with the plugin.

But I guess it doesn´t work like this...
Or does it?
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #6
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ThatSoundsWHAMMY's Avatar
 

Awesome review.
I must say this unit looks a lot better that I though it would.
Compared to the image Summit are pushing it looks like a completely different unit.
You'd wonder how Summit allowed such an unflattering photo of their own product to reach the masses.
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #7
Audio Alchemist
 
Lagerfeldt's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by skuttbergsveen View Post
This looks really cool!

Does it have any communication with the DAW? Or how do you operate the recall data?

I mean, the whole idea with a digital controlled analog equipment should be that the settings would be stored in the DAW-project.
The concept behind digital control is first and foremost to have recall and true stereo control on the unit itself, but you certainly can control and store presets in the DAW by using MIDI (CC and SysEx) or the dedicated TDM plug-in. I'm working on a Logic Pro environment to control the machine.

Quote:
This could be done if it had a (control-)plugin connected to it; you could control it by either the plugin or the knobs and the entire setting would be stored with the plugin.

But I guess it doesn´t work like this...
Or does it?
Yes, it does. :-) The EQ-200 has MIDI In, Out, and Thru.

Quote:
· MIDI or TDM plug-in controllable
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #8
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Paul Gold's Avatar
 

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8 Reviews written
What is the slope of the HPF/LPF?
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #9
Gear Addict
 

A very good review! thanks!

This unit looks like a very very good tool!

But one of the biggest Cons for me is that there is only one bandwith for the lower and higher band...which makes the low and high frequencies choice more limited that it looks.

I would maybe have changed my Maselec with this Summit, but i'm scared it won't be as versatile as the MEA-2 in the low and high-end, especially for electronic music.
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #10
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MAzevedo's Avatar
 

I really liked this EQ when I demo'd it a few years back. It's a shame they dropped the blue faceplate for grey, though. I liked the blue.
Old 27th May 2009
  #11
Mastering
 

Thanks for the great review, Lagerfeldt. Under Midi control can you advance the presets with program changes or are you reduced to using CC ("control voltage") changes, which for mastering can be slower and more awkward. With my Weiss gear I can count the number of times I need CC on half the fingers of one hand in one year! I nearly always just recall a program change and hope that would be equivalent to loading a preset from the equalizer. What are the ergonomics of Sysex? Can you preload a bunch of presets via Sysex? What are the ergonomics of the MIDI control?

Basically I want to know how well the equalizer fulfills its ability to be remote controllable from a sequencer in a mastering workflow.

BK
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #12
Audio Alchemist
 
Lagerfeldt's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Gold View Post
What is the slope of the HPF/LPF?
It's all there ;-) :

Filter Section
The EQ-200 has two very flexible filters. Each can work as a 12dB/Octave high-pass or low-pass filter. This means you can have a HPF and a LPF at the same time or you can stack two filters of the same kind for a steeper 24dB/Octave slope. Since the filters are completely independent you can even have two filters of the same kind at two different frequencies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartacus View Post
But one of the biggest Cons for me is that there is only one bandwith for the lower and higher band...which makes the low and high frequencies choice more limited that it looks.

I would maybe have changed my Maselec with this Summit, but i'm scared it won't be as versatile as the MEA-2 in the low and high-end, especially for electronic music.
I think the EQ-200 is great as the alternative EQ, i.e. in combination with another analog unit (perhaps a parametric tube EQ) or a digital EQ.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bob katz View Post
Thanks for the great review, Lagerfeldt. Under Midi control can you advance the presets with program changes or are you reduced to using CC ("control voltage") changes, which for mastering can be slower and more awkward. With my Weiss gear I can count the number of times I need CC on half the fingers of one hand in one year! I nearly always just recall a program change and hope that would be equivalent to loading a preset from the equalizer. What are the ergonomics of Sysex? Can you preload a bunch of presets via Sysex? What are the ergonomics of the MIDI control?

Basically I want to know how well the equalizer fulfills its ability to be remote controllable from a sequencer in a mastering workflow.
I should probably get back when I have some spare time and write more about the MIDI functionality. Stay tuned.

What sequencer would you be using for that? There is also a fully implemented TDM plug-in available. I'm working on a Logic Pro environment, perhaps I can upload it when finished or share some data for others to make their own.
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #13
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Paul Gold's Avatar
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagerfeldt View Post
It's all there ;-) :
Ooops. So it is. Thanks. It's a very good review.
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #14
Audio Alchemist
 
Lagerfeldt's Avatar
Thanks!
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #15
Hi Lagerfelt, how do u feel the EQ for mixing? ...and it is totall trasnparent or the EQ has a personal/unique sound?
Old 27th May 2009
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagerfeldt View Post
Perhaps the explanation for its lack of market penetration into the mastering world is to be found in its origin: it was originally designed as part of the TEC Award winning MPE-200 preamp/equalizer. A no-compromise unit which Mr. Rupert Neve considered his best work at the time.
Is your EQ-200 exactly the same as the MPE-200, except for the preamps in the other version?

Thanks,

Mychal
Old 27th May 2009 | Show parent
  #17
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Tom H's Avatar
 

Cheers for the review!

Very intriguing piece of gear... if indeed all the functions of this eq can be automated, a bunch of these would make a sweet setup in combination with a Matrix and TDM. Throw a Weiss eq and dynamics on the 2 buss after the AD and you should have one sweet sounding setup with full automation and recall... Sorry for this little sky castle but it would be awsome!
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #18
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Nice review, Holger. I've always thought this EQ looked kinda interesting, but if I'm not mistaken, the TDM control plugin was orphaned so long ago, they didn't even mention it anymore in the product/web blurbage. IIRC, it might not even have been compatible beyond ProTools 5.

Any idea if there's plans to refresh that thing?

-dave
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #19
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It's ironic that people try to avoid VCA's in mixing and now they are in analog mastering equalisers.

MIDI in mastering? What's next, crying in baseball?


DC
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #20
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WunderBro Flo's Avatar
Thanks for the in depth review! I have the MPE-200 (the version with micpres) and loved it from the start. The units should be identical concerning the eq section, but on the MPE-200 the filters are on the MicPre Input before the Line("EQ") Inputs. Afaik the filters of the EQ200 come after the EQ section. On the MPE you can access Mic and EQ separately as they have their own XLR ins and outs. The Mic in also accepts line level signals at unity gain, so you can use it including the filters for masterung and you can patch the filters either before or after the EQ.

The slopes of the shelving EQs deserve some mentioning. The bass shelf affects frequencies way above it´s number. the 35Hz setting goes way up in the 100Hz+ region. So it´s not your EQ to treat the subbass only. The settings around 125Hz affects the 300Hz region and even higher as well, just to keep it in mind. It sounds fantastic though.
The high shelf also starts a bit "early" as many Neve designs. The 20kHz setting for example starts around 8kHz and up. So any lower setting like 10kHz will dig deep in the high mids. The hishelf curve is also slightly resonant, when you boost 20kHz for example you will push the 4-8k region down just a little and then lift the region above 8kHz. Now the good thing is you can swithch it to bell, then the slight dip under the boosted area turns into a slight liftup. Pretty useful&versatile for an analog eq in that regard.
Great that it is not a sought after legendary piece on GS. The prices these go for are silly low sometimes. If you find one, get it! I paid under 2000.- for mine some years ago. Sick price for what these puppies can do. Just think about it, Rupert has done many amazing pieces. The fact that he considered the Summit units the best work he had ever done (back then as he did not have his own product line) should mean something.

Rock on!
Pat
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #21
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Lagerfeldt's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildCowboys View Post
T
The slopes of the shelving EQs deserve some mentioning. The bass shelf affects frequencies way above it´s number. the 35Hz setting goes way up in the 100Hz+ region. So it´s not your EQ to treat the subbass only. The settings around 125Hz affects the 300Hz region and even higher as well, just to keep it in mind. It sounds fantastic though.

The high shelf also starts a bit "early" as many Neve designs. The 20kHz setting for example starts around 8kHz and up. So any lower setting like 10kHz will dig deep in the high mids. The hishelf curve is also slightly resonant, when you boost 20kHz for example you will push the 4-8k region down just a little and then lift the region above 8kHz.
Thanks for your thoughts. I think that explains my comment about the shelving filters being the most colored part of the unit, which I like a lot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AMIEL View Post
Hi Lagerfelt, how do u feel the EQ for mixing? ...and it is totall trasnparent or the EQ has a personal/unique sound?
A bit of both in fact, which should be clear from the review.
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #22
Mastering
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dcollins View Post
It's ironic that people try to avoid VCA's in mixing and now they are in analog mastering equalisers.

MIDI in mastering? What's next, crying in baseball?


DC
How about crying all the way to the bank? As your workflow and productivity improve so do your income. But seriously, Lagerfeldt said nothing about the exact technology used inside the Summit. I await word from Summit as to the technology that they use. But that won't prevent me from trying a unit out to see how it sounds. If it sounds bad and the MIDI ergonomics are good it won't sell to me. If it sounds good and the MIDI ergonomics are bad it also won't sell to me!

Unfortunately, they have to build them to order. We shall see.
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #23
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WunderBro Flo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob katz View Post
How about crying all the way to the bank? As your workflow and productivity improve so do your income. But seriously, Lagerfeldt said nothing about the exact technology used inside the Summit. I await word from Summit as to the technology that they use. But that won't prevent me from trying a unit out to see how it sounds. If it sounds bad and the MIDI ergonomics are good it won't sell to me. If it sounds good and the MIDI ergonomics are bad it also won't sell to me!

Unfortunately, they have to build them to order. We shall see.
Afaik all parameters have their own midi controller message. All that can be done on the unit can be automated via MIDI, recalling presets or changing the gain of a single band, changing the f of the filter, everything. They also had a PT plugin that is not officially available anymore. They sent it to me about 3 years ago I think, never tried it, but I am sure I can dig it out somewhere. I am also sure that if you want to control it via MIDI for mastering that it will work beautifully (as long as you do not blend between two songs where changing the preset would have to happen "morphing" during the fade....it won´t do that. I was considering buying a second one at one day to be able to work around this potential problem, each odd song gets unit A, the even songs get unit B.
The only drawback I know of is that there are no more than 16 presets. You can set a midi command at the beginning of each song to switch to "their" preset. You can set up the Summit so that while the song plays and you adjust the EQ, the setting will be automatically stored as the active preset. This way you can jump between songs and listen, tweak the EQ and jump to another song.....the adjustments you make will be automatically saved for the preset that is activated for each song. Pretty cool, but when you have more than 16 songs, you´re f*cked. Too sad.....memory is so cheap, 16 presets is so 80ies.....

Best,
Pat
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #24
Mastering
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildCowboys View Post
Afaik all parameters have their own midi controller message.

snip

Pat
I go that from the MIDI implementation manual. I haven't yet finished reading the main manual, so maybe this next question is answered. It seems from the MIDI implementation there is no easy method of storing the parameters of all the presets that you used. So you can then change to another project. How is that done?
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #25
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Waltz Mastering's Avatar
 

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1 Review written
FWIW, I cried when the ball went through Bill Buckner's legs, but I'm ok now.
Old 28th May 2009 | Show parent
  #26
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WunderBro Flo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob katz View Post
I go that from the MIDI implementation manual. I haven't yet finished reading the main manual, so maybe this next question is answered. It seems from the MIDI implementation there is no easy method of storing the parameters of all the presets that you used. So you can then change to another project. How is that done?
I am not totally sure, but I remember that there is a midi command which makes the unit put out all it´s data - if you record that and play it back into the machine at the beginning of a recalle dsession, this might set all presets up for the songs of the project. But it might be possible I am wrong and this "send all data" command only sends the data of the active preset, not the entire machine and all presets.....I guess Summit can answer that via email!

Best,
Pat
Old 30th May 2009 | Show parent
  #27
Mastering
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildCowboys View Post
I am not totally sure, but I remember that there is a midi command which makes the unit put out all it´s data - if you record that and play it back into the machine at the beginning of a recalle dsession, this might set all presets up for the songs of the project. But it might be possible I am wrong and this "send all data" command only sends the data of the active preset, not the entire machine and all presets.....I guess Summit can answer that via email!

Best,
Pat
It looks to me like from the MIDI implementation manual that it outputs the ACTIVE preset. This means that to output 16 presets back to the computer would involve a many hop, skips and jumps for what could be a rather simple thing to program. It would be a BIG omission if store and restore could not be done in one fell swoop.
I hope that I am reading the manual wrong.

Holger or anyone else with the EQ-200, please respond. Thanks,

BK
Old 30th May 2009 | Show parent
  #28
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e-cue's Avatar
 

I still think Summit Audio should dust off the Extension 78 controller "plug in".
Old 30th May 2009 | Show parent
  #29
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WunderBro Flo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by e-cue View Post
I still think Summit Audio should dust off the Extension 78 controller "plug in".
I can send it to anyone who wants it, summit gave it away for free. It´s just that I cannt go to the studio next week, out of town...
Old 30th May 2009 | Show parent
  #30
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WunderBro Flo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob katz View Post
It looks to me like from the MIDI implementation manual that it outputs the ACTIVE preset. This means that to output 16 presets back to the computer would involve a many hop, skips and jumps for what could be a rather simple thing to program. It would be a BIG omission if store and restore could not be done in one fell swoop.
I hope that I am reading the manual wrong.

Holger or anyone else with the EQ-200, please respond. Thanks,

BK
I can look into this when I am back in the studio in 10 days.
Even if it only worked for the active preset only, it would be easy to set up one MIDI track for that purpose which does
step1:program change preset1
step2:send all data
step3: program change preset2
step4:send all data
and so on...


That would automate the process. Just import that MIDI track at the end of the session, play it back while recording the summit´s output to a new track.

Best,
Pat
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