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relationship between mix engineer and mastering engineer.
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
relationship between mix engineer and mastering engineer.

hi, i'm a mix engineer, it's been just a few months since i started to work with artists.
since my clients are indie artists, they're limited in budget so they always want, and expect me to also master their songs.
so my mixes have never been mastered by mastering engineer.

when i watch interviews of some mix engineers who i really look up to,
they would say something like, 'these days, i use joe la porta to master my mixes',
instead of saying 'these days, i recommend joe la porta to master my mixes'.
i thought it would be the artists, who hires the mastering engineer,
but it sounds like those mix engineers hire mastering engineers.
so, do some mixers include the mastering rates in their rates so the mix engineer would directly pay mastering engineer?
or is it just the way of saying it and they would just say to their clients the mastering engineer they recommend?

i know, it's such a weird question.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
I have a lot of mixer clients who I master (at least mostly) all of what they mix.

I'm sure different ones work it different ways, but typically they'll recommend me and make the clients aware of my rates from the outset of the project (on their end).

Some of them deal with me themselves, others just do a quick intro email and let the client handle it. I've made sure to set up my workflow so that anyone who wants to be involved (artist, mixer, producer, label, mgmt) can easily be worked looped into the process, because it's always different.


I do think I do my best work with these longstanding repeat clients - they notice pattens in my masters and push me to do better work, and I do the same in their mixes. Communication is key and it only gets better as the projects stack up.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by the3030club View Post
I have a lot of mixer clients who I master (at least mostly) all of what they mix.

I'm sure different ones work it different ways, but typically they'll recommend me and make the clients aware of my rates from the outset of the project (on their end).

Some of them deal with me themselves, others just do a quick intro email and let the client handle it. I've made sure to set up my workflow so that anyone who wants to be involved (artist, mixer, producer, label, mgmt) can easily be worked looped into the process, because it's always different.


I do think I do my best work with these longstanding repeat clients - they notice pattens in my masters and push me to do better work, and I do the same in their mixes. Communication is key and it only gets better as the projects stack up.
thank you for sharing your experience, it helps me much.
i'm just listening to your works and they sound pretty awesome.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldvodka View Post
thank you for sharing your experience, it helps me much.
i'm just listening to your works and they sound pretty awesome.
Thank you for the kind words! I haven't updated my site for over a year now - Just too busy with mastering. I've been fortunate to work on some great records in that time, so i'm due for an update.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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MASSIVE Master's Avatar
 

Verified Member
What you're really asking about is the relationship between the artist and the mixing engineer.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
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Jerry Tubb's Avatar
 

Verified Member
it can go either way, depending on various factors.

we have dozens of studios & mix engineers that are our “regulars”.

they refer most of their clients to us, and in turn we send inquiries to them,

it’s the old school referral system, word of mouth, based on relationship & results.

occasionally a producer in the mix will send the project to a diff ME, based on their preferences.

the worst case scenario is uploading their mixes to one of those silly automatic “mastering” algorithms, due to no budget.

best, jt
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Lives for gear
for me it's just like the 3030 club said.

a few mixers/producers pay me directly, most just introduce me to the artists and away we go.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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Chris Chapelle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by the3030club View Post
I have a lot of mixer clients who I master (at least mostly) all of what they mix.

I'm sure different ones work it different ways, but typically they'll recommend me and make the clients aware of my rates from the outset of the project (on their end).

Some of them deal with me themselves, others just do a quick intro email and let the client handle it. I've made sure to set up my workflow so that anyone who wants to be involved (artist, mixer, producer, label, mgmt) can easily be worked looped into the process, because it's always different.


I do think I do my best work with these longstanding repeat clients - they notice pattens in my masters and push me to do better work, and I do the same in their mixes. Communication is key and it only gets better as the projects stack up.
More or less the same.
It depends of what the project and musicians need.

But
Having people who can speak and critic, positively, you back about what you have Enhance on their vision of the production, without searching to know how you did it, is a really mega plus.
I really admire my mixing guys, because I would not be able to do what they are doing. Too many faders....

For me, it is more than control, it's mastery driven by a skilled crew.

With 2 of my mixing engineers, we have setup a deal where mixing + mastering is only 1 price, kind of an all included quote. In that case I never deal with the customer. On my side, mixing engineers are better skilled as producers than I am.

With the others, if the client mixes at one of my men, he knows that he would have a price coming to my studio, but he can go everywhere else he wants.
In that case my mixing guy introduce me to the customer.

I hope this helps.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
An added bonus (at least in my case) of longstanding relationships with mixers is the ability to ping them when you're experimenting.

I have a few such clients that don't miss ANYTHING sonically, and it's great to ask them when i'm trying out some new gear, or a new limiter, or even a new dither or something stupid like that.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
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I.R.Baboon's Avatar
Well colour me disappointed, from the thread title i was hoping for some salacious gossip like "Bob Power has Chris Athen's love child".....
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by MASSIVE Master View Post
What you're really asking about is the relationship between the artist and the mixing engineer.
that's also true. haven't thought about it that way.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
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Justin P.'s Avatar
 

I think it's common for some of the busier mixing engineers to push to use their "go to" mastering engineer because there is less likely to be any surprises or hassles with file/project delivery. Smooth sailing is more of a guarantee.

There are a handful of mixing engineers that send me a majority of their projects but I understand they can't all come my way. Sometimes it's not the right fit for whatever reason.

A significant amount of projects I get are mixed by somebody I do not know or have never worked with and then that often results in repeat projects from that particular band/artist and sometimes that also results in having that particular mix engineer send more work my way.

I really don't see much difference between "These days I use X" vs. "These days I recommend X" to be honest.


A big part of why I ended up mastering full-time is because my recording/mixing clients didn't know what mastering really was, expected me to be able to do it, and this was before it was easy to transmit and coordinate revisions via Internet so I ended up being one of the main options in my area which ended up working out in the long run.

Having been through a similar situation, I would say that do everything in your power to convince bands/clients that budgeting for an outside mastering engineer will be a huge benefit to their project in the end. That's the advice I would have given myself 20 years ago though I may have not ended up where I'm at now which I'm truly happy and thankful for.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
thank you all for confirming it, which has been a mystery to me.

i think it'd be a good idea to stick with one or maybe two mastering guys,
so that they'll know and understand each other well,
mixer would be able to be aware of which aspects does he have to be changed
to improve the final result, by knowing what does that mastering engineer wants -
some might like what i'm doing in my mix bus, some might not appreciate it.
and the mastering engineer will also understand mixer's style and know how to enhance it,
thus the result may come expectedly and in right direction.
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin P. View Post
I think it's common for some of the busier mixing engineers to push to use their "go to" mastering engineer because there is less likely to be any surprises or hassles with file/project delivery. Smooth sailing is more of a guarantee.

There are a handful of mixing engineers that send me a majority of their projects but I understand they can't all come my way. Sometimes it's not the right fit for whatever reason.

A significant amount of projects I get are mixed by somebody I do not know or have never worked with and then that often results in repeat projects from that particular band/artist and sometimes that also results in having that particular mix engineer send more work my way.

I really don't see much difference between "These days I use X" vs. "These days I recommend X" to be honest.


A big part of why I ended up mastering full-time is because my recording/mixing clients didn't know what mastering really was, expected me to be able to do it, and this was before it was easy to transmit and coordinate revisions via Internet so I ended up being one of the main options in my area which ended up working out in the long run.

Having been through a similar situation, I would say that do everything in your power to convince bands/clients that budgeting for an outside mastering engineer will be a huge benefit to their project in the end. That's the advice I would have given myself 20 years ago though I may have not ended up where I'm at now which I'm truly happy and thankful for.
great answer. thank you.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
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Justin P.'s Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by coldvodka View Post
great answer. thank you.
No problem. I should have said:

"budgeting for THE RIGHT mastering engineer will be a huge benefit to their project in the end."
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by the3030club View Post
I have a lot of mixer clients who I master (at least mostly) all of what they mix.

I'm sure different ones work it different ways, but typically they'll recommend me and make the clients aware of my rates from the outset of the project (on their end).

Some of them deal with me themselves, others just do a quick intro email and let the client handle it. I've made sure to set up my workflow so that anyone who wants to be involved (artist, mixer, producer, label, mgmt) can easily be worked looped into the process, because it's always different.


I do think I do my best work with these longstanding repeat clients - they notice pattens in my masters and push me to do better work, and I do the same in their mixes. Communication is key and it only gets better as the projects stack up.
+1

at least 70% of my jobs are because the mixing engineer prefer to work with me.
mixing (-engineer) / mastering (-engineer) is in best case a symbiosis.
Old 1 week ago
  #17
working in a well grown relationship between mixers and masterers leads to better overall results. That's the matter why most mixers suggest particular masterers to clients. Sometimes the production wants some specific guy/studio/brand.
Old 1 week ago
  #18
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da goose's Avatar
Same here, but actually it also works the other way around. Sometimes people come to me for mixing as well, but I don't do mixing. In that case I forward them to a mixing engineer which suits the project. I have a couple of mixing engineers in my direct area that I work with in these cases.
I even have a dedicated page on my site for it: Mixing |
Old 1 week ago
  #19
Gear Addict
 
karibu's Avatar
 

It's pretty common that the mixing engineer has a regular partnership with a mastering engineer (sometimes more than just one, but never hundreds...), I think it's a natural evolution of a personal and professional trust.

I have (as many colleagues) several mixing engineers who I master a high percentage of jobs, the same happens with producers.

Sometimes happened that also artists directly contacted me after a job I've done through another professional, simply they have changed engineer/producer and when was looking for a ME they contacted the one who did the previous.

I'm also used to encourge this kind of partnership, for example I offer other professionals a reduced rate than what I ask to artists, that happens a lot in my Country because unfortunately there is a "low profile" mastering culture, many recording studios offers full packages so it's pretty common that people don't know exactly what a specialized ME can do, so I try to change this behaviour...in fact I do the most of my jobs for foreign productions...

Last edited by karibu; 1 week ago at 03:25 PM.. Reason: minor change
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