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Mastering Loudness - LUFS and "Dynamic Range >9?"
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Mastering Loudness - LUFS and "Dynamic Range >9?"

I have a legitimate question for Mastering Pros...

According to this link I read (which you can read it here), LUFS standards for streaming recommends certain streaming levels along with having a dynamic range of ">9" according to the LRA meter on LUFS meters.

Dynamic Range greater than 9?
I've gone out to iTunes, both in the Store (which does NOT recalibrate uploaded levels) and I've checked out iTune Radio commercial audio (which does set everything to the same loudness levels, regardless of dynamic range, and this is what I've noticed...
  1. I've been lucky to find current commercial mixes, streamed or otherwise, that have a dynamic range of 5 or 6.
  2. I've checked out the iTune radio (which does set everything to the same loudness levels, regardless of dynamic range.

I understand the tricks of adjusting elements such as kick, snare, and bass on verses and such to increase dynamic range and overall perceived loudness.

I'm NOT a loudness addict that needs to be pegging the needle instead of kissing it, and I DO LOVE dynamics, but in order to feel some of the mixes without reaching for the volume knob, I've only been able to get my mixes to maybe 6 or 7 LUs, and that was a fight.

I guess my real question is this; is the industry or these streaming sites using the recommended dynamic range as a measurement of wither it is passible audio or not?

I look forward to feedback from the pros!
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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loji's Avatar
Nope, it's the wild west... You can make the dynamic range anything you want, if the label approves it, no streaming site will reject it for non-compliance

But just because you *can* .. doesn't mean that you *should*

Quote:
Originally Posted by linenoise View Post
I guess my real question is this; is the industry or these streaming sites using the recommended dynamic range as a measurement of wither it is passible audio or not?
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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SmoothTone's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by linenoise View Post
I guess my real question is this; is the industry or these streaming sites using the recommended dynamic range as a measurement of wither it is passible audio or not?
As far as I'm aware, dynamic range measurement is only used by audio bloggers and anti-loudness-war campaigners to promote awareness and there is no accepted standard for DR in music production.

Hopefully with emerging loudness normalisation standards we can start to focus more on setting dynamics and density appropriate to the music and worry less about all these numbers.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Gear Head
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothTone View Post
As far as I'm aware, dynamic range measurement is only used by audio bloggers and anti-loudness-war campaigners to promote awareness and there is no accepted standard for DR in music production.

Hopefully with emerging loudness normalisation standards we can start to focus more on setting dynamics and density appropriate to the music and worry less about all these numbers.
I'm in full compliance with that concept. LOL! I just wanted to hear from some career mastering engineers on that concern, as I am only budgeted to master the mixes myself for most of my clients. Thanks! Of course if anyone else wants to chime in, I'm all ears.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
mpr
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Here's what I think is going to happen in 5-10 years time:

Streaming is going to account for over 95% of all plays - our phones, cars and homes will all pull from the same sites, sub'd or not.

Streaming sites are going to continue normalizing to -14 to -18. Eventually they will find a sweet spot for all music, and they may all agree.

Labels / artists will continue to worry about how their track compares to tracks played before and after theirs, only now 'better' is no longer louder.

An 'Uh Oh!' moment will occur as they realize their back catalogs are smashed to hell and back and will playback inferior to modern masters.

Tons and tons of Remastering will begin occurring, especially on catalog that has financial legs.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Worth mentioning that the established definition for dynamic range is "full scale to noise floor ratio". It is primarily meant to describe media and playback systems, not signals.

The dynamic range of any normalized audio is more or less the medium's dynamic range (given the noise floor hasn't been artificially increased).


What these bloggers and whoever really mean is the crest factor. A peak to average ratio.
Alternatives would be modern loudness measurements (e.g. EBU r128).
But the dynamic range (following the official definition) is somewhat boring and musically useless!
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