The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Scott Hull thread! Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 10th January 2017
  #61
DAH
Lives for gear
 
DAH's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
I dont agree..

Read carefully.. THE BEST way ... ios to understand what it is that you are hearing and what can be considered a constant.
When listening to 2 CD's played back one after the other ni the same player.. you can assume that certain parameters are constant.. While it's harder to compare them directly - you can hear the differences.

When you rip the data into a DAW and compare them - Some of the parameters Might be changed. I agree with the statement that Two Files that NUL in the DAW does NOT mean that the tow CD's sound identical. It only means that the data used to create them was identical. ANd be cause of the "NUL" also . Dither is random and will not cancel on null - but that is expected.

This can become a HUGE topic. - and is' not new to this forum.
When I rip either "bad" or "good" CD and I know the checksum is the same for both considering the 44.1 kHz 16 bit PCM source format I know that NOTHING in terms of AUDIO data is lost, otherwise we would have MASTER SOURCES fo text files being afraid to copy\paste them etc.
CDs are different only when played back real time in CD-PLAYERS (monoblock or transport-DAC) due to the timing jitter in DAC induced by factors elaborated in said articles. When you play digitally identical files on a computer there is NO CHANCE they sound different. The problem lies exclusively in real-time playback of different CDs pressed from the same data source on a CD-player.
Ripping does not add dither.
Old 10th January 2017
  #62
Lives for gear
 

So we should probably start a new thread if we want to discuss the general nature of CD playback and jitter. This isn't the place to do it.
Old 10th January 2017
  #63
Lives for gear
 
MattGray's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
After much debate and trials and revisions on one song.. one which DF wanted to change his vocal sound a little.. If i recall correctly - it was just a little hollow as in a little too much vocal energy around 4-500... we tried several eq options.. he would take multiple eq options home with him and listen in his known environment. We were getting close most of the record was approved .. we had just one song that was bothering him. ( we were about 6- or 7 revisions in ) but the taking it home and listening process was taking too long .. so he brought in his own speakers and i set them up. ( sorry - i can not be 100% certain the make and model ) but they were his studio and home near-field reference.
At this point - we weren't using the speakers so much as a reference for the rest of the world.. but they were how Donald heard music - they were his reference.. and the reason this was so critical - he explained to me that even the slightest eq change in the mid range sounded to him like we were change the balances of the rhythm instruments. Even a .2 or .4 dbd change of eq changed the relative volumes of one shaker to the other swinging eight note shaker part. These balances were Critical to him. in the end - he opted for the slightly boxy vocal sound as it was originally mixed - that maintained his rhythm track's mix perspective. How could anyone argue with that ?
Hi Scott, good to see you here. Is this one of those times where you wish you had the vocals on it's own stem so you can correct the EQ balance without altering the other elements in the mix? Do you have a preference to working with stereo mixes or working with stems?

For me I find both have advantages and disadvantages but it's interesting that even with the most careful and professional mixers working on big budget albums where time isn't a factor, they can quite often miss things and trying to correct those things on a stereo mix can often lead to more work and time that could be avoided if the element in question was on it's own stem or fixed in a re-mix. Of course working with stems can change the overall cohesion of the mix if there was bus compression involved in the mix process but I usually find that isn't too hard recreate or approximate in the mastering stage anyway.

Don't get me wrong though, I usually much prefer working on a great stereo mix than tweaking stems but sometimes I find when there is an issue and you're trying to fix it on the stereo mix, that compromises are usually made in other areas where these compromises could be avoided with the appropriate stem/s.

Last edited by MattGray; 10th January 2017 at 03:11 AM..
Old 10th January 2017
  #64
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ed littman View Post
Great questions & thread Jerry!
Scott great stories. You may not know this but I have learned much from you indirectly from Dave McNair when he worked out of my room a few years back.
I only heard about the quickly rolling through part of your process. Thanks for filling the rest!
Hi Ed, Hope your doing well _ A good 2017 to you !
LOL - I think Dave studied ME's like i did... taking a little of one persons techniques and something from the others. Morphing of course as you go.
I had experience with many different MEs to imitate and emulate - Or NOT as the case may have been
Old 10th January 2017
  #65
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattGray View Post
Hi Scott, good to see you here. Is this one of those times where you wish you had the vocals on it's own stem so you can correct the EQ balance without altering the other elements in the mix? Do you have a preference to working with stereo mixes or working with stems?

For me I find both have advantages and disadvantages but it's interesting that even with the most careful and professional mixers working on big budget albums where time isn't a factor, they can quite often miss things and trying to correct those things on a stereo mix can often lead to more work and time that could be avoided if the element in question was on it's own stem. Of course it can change the overall cohesion of the mix if there was bus compression involved in the mix process but I usually find that easier to recreate or approximate in the mastering stage anyway.

Don't get me wrong though, I usually much prefer working on a great stereo mix than tweaking stems but sometimes I find when there is an issue and you're trying to fix it on the stereo mix, that compromises are usually made in other areas where these compromises could be avoided with the appropriate stem/s.

Yes i tend to agree. Stereo mix - is just more direct.. I can understand what the producer was going for and one big factor for me - I don't really feel like the Stems = The mix - Un less the mix was derived from the stems in the first place. SO .. some times - i'm "Forced" to make a hybred of the stereo and stems mastered - Comping the two together in a manner of speaking. It's a clumsy way of mastering.

Better for me - when it's an ITB mix and when there is time and patience from the client - To discuss alternate mixes.
For all you mixes out there - Please understand that sending an (analog ME ) a revised mix - that it really is equivalent to sending in a completely new mix. There's no way to know for certain that the changes made don't have negative effects on the mix as a whole.. I'm often asked to run an alternate mix thru the same settings - only to find out after that the changes that were made to the mix - make the new mastered song sound "wrong"... A Classic case of this - is a mastering chain set up to deal with a vocal that is too loud.. so when you print a mix with the vocal lower - then nearly everything has to change to find the new balance.

I'm never against going the extra mile to get it right .. Just understand that it's not a simple matter of dropping the same plugs onto the new mix....


re:
the compromises you mentioned - Yes !! i agree. if we could only know what we learn ... before the mastering session. Have you ever had someone bring their entire mix session to the mastering? I had a client that liked to do that .. Told me - he wanted to be able to tweak the mix after hearing what the mastering changed.. it's a good "concept" that completely doesn't work !!

I found i had to change my entire approach.. Listen and tweak - and comment.. Let him listen - then he'd tweak the mix - then i'd change my eq settings.. It was like a Sidewalk Salsa ! Took hours .. and just a few songs in and i was exhausted and had lost ALL sence of objectivity. We finished the record but it did affect our friendship ! lol


one more thought.. from beginner mixers.. I've encountered several good but less experienced engineers that just don't have a good sence about mixing.. They can deliver pretty good sounding stereo stems - but the mix they come up with really is poor.. For them stem mastering to the rescue. And in fact this client has been getting better at mixing after listening to my results that we generally don't need the stems now..
Old 10th January 2017
  #66
Lives for gear
 
Jerry Tubb's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Agreed it's just easier to work with a good stereo mix.

Reverting to stems can open Pandora's box, and seemingly endless micro tweaks!

But if it works for the producer, and the budget is there...

Best, JT

Scott, would you like to describe some of your favorite current gear choices, since it's the GS forum?
Old 10th January 2017
  #67
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
Please understand that sending an (analog ME ) a revised mix - that it really is equivalent to sending in a completely new mix. There's no way to know for certain that the changes made don't have negative effects on the mix as a whole.. I'm often asked to run an alternate mix thru the same settings - only to find out after that the changes that were made to the mix - make the new mastered song sound "wrong"...
Well, I'm quite amazed that even at your level you deal with this kind of problem. I can't begin to tell you how many times I had to explain the same exact thing to my clients. "Don't touch your chain, you don't have to do anything, I will change it in the mix and you can run it through untouched" - Well, it doesn't work like that, isn't it! this I can say is the most frequent (and annoying)situation I have to deal with ... don't get me wrong, I go to any length to satisfy my customers, I don't charge for revisions, they can have as many as they want ... but don't start altering your mix and use me as a "tool" . honestly, when they same stuff like don't touch anything just run it again I find it a bit offensive ...of course I don't tell them that but I feel like I'm some kind of "automated service"

C.
Old 10th January 2017
  #68
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
In case it wasn't obvious.

You can ask me anything....

thx
scott
How many people have you fired and how did it make you feel?
Old 10th January 2017
  #69
Lives for gear
 
Silvertone's Avatar
Hey Scott, are you a musician?

I'm amazed when I ask the question to people I work with... Eddie Kramer is a classically trained pianist. Chris Muth, a bass player. Dave Amels a Hammond B3 player. If I recall correctly I think Bob Ludwig told me he used to play trumpet. Paul Orofino, a classically trained guitarist. Denny Purcell was a bass player. It is what got so many people started in the business in the first place

I'm a bass player, Chapman Stick player. Also, play my fair share of drums and some guitar. I got into this business after touring in the 70's... toured with a lot of great acts on their way up... and their way down.

So how about you? Any playing or road stories from back in the day? Any vintage instruments hiding in your closet?
Old 11th January 2017
  #70
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Tubb View Post
Another question of interest to me and hopefully others, would be for you to describe how you got involved in audio and music, what led to your eventual rise to work with Bob at Masterdisk, and then go out on your own.

What & how did it happen, what gave you the x-factor to exceed and succeed?

Thanks, JT
Jerry,
Since i hate to talk about myself... ha.lol

It was an interesting time to get a start in the biz. that was 1983 - 84 and digital hadn't really entered the mainstream pro studios. When it did - almost no-one knew what to do with them. Sony's Guz Skinas was the NYC rep and he would literally travel with the sony gear from session to session until the engineers and techs at each studio learned how to set the systems up and knew what to look for - Gus was very helpful.
I was the IN-House digital maven. Didn't know it at teh time .. because everything came so gradually - but i had developed some skills with this digital gear and the Studio recognized my contributions.

So - for younger EM's - that opportunity isn't there.. but similar ones are .. there are new apps and plugs and interfaces and equipment and social media platforms and ....etc.. almost everyday. So - consider how you can make your self indispensable. Don't think that once you learn the a-b-c's of recording or mastering at a school or from Youtube - that you will have a place set for you at an established studio. It takes way more than that. BUT - you can make the process go a lot faster if you can find something that the Chief doesn't like to do - and become an expert at it.
For me - it's dongles - and plug in licenses... I hate it all. the only think i liek less is passwords and locks. I've often said that a locked door only keeps out the pepl e that are Supposed to be there.. Anyone elese is wiling to break somethign to get in. Likemy car

I have multiple mdaws- PC and Macs,,, machines in multiple rooms each with licenses and different sets of plugs in various states of completion.. .. -it just make my head ache to try to describe the wasted time... just as i get things stable - and predictable - something else changes.... i need a new pc - or a new IT guy comes in and changes something unexpectedly. ... Dang - I USED to be the IT guy .. back before Windows that's right there were computers before "Windows"... They seem like fossils now but we got a lot of work done with them and in many ways they were more like workshop tools. and less like smart (ass) apps.


Anyway.. Another interesting point is that i spent just short of 10 years as an assistant / apprentice. I had a FEW of my own mastering projects - friends and low budget stuff - but that first 10 years was watching and learning and doing the daily work. I was kept very busy supporting the senior engineers. That is a LOT of listening to very high quality releases every day.
You can learn mastering just by listening. Some of the today's senior and experiences ME's started without ANY formal audio training. and no - I'm not naming names...
Others came to mastering with TON's of relevant music / production/ technical / social skills.

if i don't get questions then - i'm just going to ramble on about whatev
...
Old 11th January 2017
  #71
Lives for gear
 
Greg Reierson's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
You can learn mastering just by listening.
Essential! But it takes a good room and good monitors. Very hard to do in a poor room with band-limited speakers.
Old 11th January 2017
  #72
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone View Post
Hey Scott, are you a musician?

So how about you? Any playing or road stories from back in the day? Any vintage instruments hiding in your closet?
I played ( and still play Trombone at a somewhat high level )
I was a double major - so i received an authentic BA in Performance on Trombone ... Which as most of us know qualifies me to Drive the Cool car... ( joke ) How do know which car in the parking lot is the trombone players... ? It has the Dominoes delivery sign on top

Yes - Most of the pro engineers i have met are equally talented on an instrument. That's the one skill I use Everyday !!

Not too exciting these days.. I almost completely stopped playing - for thirty years.. Occasionally i'd be asked to play a riff or part.
There are two Mercury Rev songs on a record called "See you on the other side " from the 90's that i played some Trombone parts on.. i was recording some of their tracks in my "Home " studio in Upstate new york...
And power trio from NJ named Chicken Scratch had me play Trombone - while i was helping them record their album They had a moment on College radio.. sort of Meat Puppets ish.. song "Tom Takes Toilets to Tinseltown"

but then a really long spell of no playing.

I've been looking for a reason to play - and just this year got serious enough to join the community orchestra nearby in Croton NY. It's not a philharmonic :() but it's also been thirty years plus since I've read an orchestra part for trombone.. ( if you know brass.. 85% of the part is counting rests.. ) but even that's not easy after so much time away.

I'm happy that i'm playing again. not happy how i sound.. but i'm the only one that would be disappointed , My kids think it's pretty cool ( or at least that 's what they tell me
Old 11th January 2017
  #73
Gear Nut
 
12th & Vine's Avatar
 

Seriously cool insights Scott ... thank you taking the time.
Old 11th January 2017
  #74
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Tubb View Post
Agreed it's just easier to work with a good stereo mix.

Reverting to stems can open Pandora's box, and seemingly endless micro tweaks!

But if it works for the producer, and the budget is there...

Best, JT

Scott, would you like to describe some of your favorite current gear choices, since it's the GS forum?
I hate gear.... or a love to hate gear...
All of my stuff has been in my photos for years.. I even saw one room in Europe set up with ALL of the same gear as me.. ANd it wasn't a stollen photo.... Someone when shopping with my gear list - ha. ... boring but good stuff you all know well.

Sontec, Avalon, Manley, Prism converters, Weiss EQ and DS - Antelope Clocks. Muth Monitor controller. And Duntech Sovereigns 2001 with Cello Perfomance amps. - not Dunlavely's.

But if only had my speakers and a DBX Quantum ( or similar) I can do a pretty damn good job of mastering ... so - I don't spend much thought on what new gear I need. More thought goes into what i'm going to put on the grill tonight I'm Into Pork Chops right now.. without the Bar B Q sauce .. (I know that offends many of you .. i'm really sorry.. ) but "my smoker" is still just a fantasy.

Sorry - folks - I'm happy to hang with ya - but i'm not that kinda slut.
Old 11th January 2017
  #75
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Reierson View Post
Essential! But it takes a good room and good monitors. Very hard to do in a poor room with band-limited speakers.
The Essential part for me was hearing the music Before and After mastering Everyday. Even listening on headphones - you can learn a lot.. It almost came automatically .. hearing what good mastering sounded like day after day.
Old 11th January 2017
  #76
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastervargas View Post
Well, I'm quite amazed that even at your level you deal with this kind of problem. I can't begin to tell you how many times I had to explain the same exact thing to my clients. "Don't touch your chain, you don't have to do anything, I will change it in the mix and you can run it through untouched" - Well, it doesn't work like that, isn't it! this I can say is the most frequent (and annoying)situation I have to deal with ... don't get me wrong, I go to any length to satisfy my customers, I don't charge for revisions, they can have as many as they want ... but don't start altering your mix and use me as a "tool" . honestly, when they same stuff like don't touch anything just run it again I find it a bit offensive ...of course I don't tell them that but I feel like I'm some kind of "automated service"

C.
I hear you - all the way. I feel a little like I'm just a piece of outboard equipment.. i'm sure they don't "mean" it that way - it was probably their parents fault.

Fortunately this isn't my everyday. But "At my level" doesn't really mean a lot some days. Dealing with exactly the same issues from the top to the bottom


Note : I too have a very liberal revisions policy - but that does not include freely mastering revised mixes. My feeling is I'm willing to Guaranty my mastering - but i can not and should be expected to guaranty my clients mix. They may never be satisfied. I've had to draw the line there at times.

But going the distance and turning over every stone and having the artist / producer really grateful with the final product i create - is priceless ( despite my rate card )
Old 11th January 2017
  #77
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Gold View Post
This is S.O.P. for me. I use a Prism DA2 for "play" and a Lavry Blue for "bypass". I could use two Lavry Blue DA's but I like the Prism better. I already use two DA2's. One for "play" and one for monitor after the AD capture. Three DA2's would be a bit much. The Lavry Blue also is the preview signal for when I'm cutting.
Thanks Paul.. Happy new year !

I'm doing this same thing.. using an AES switcher in front of my Monitor DAC. Since everything is clock locked the switchover is super fast ...often no click .. Oh.. but you have to use a DAC like prism.. some Dacs. mute or fade in when they see an interruption in the aes Signal.... thus making this handy function terribly frustrating.
Old 11th January 2017
  #78
Lives for gear
 

Not sure if this is of interest, but one the features of Benchmark's new DAC3 is its superfast digital switching. They claim it will switch between digital inputs fast enough to do live A-B comparisons between digital source material.
Old 11th January 2017
  #79
Lives for gear
 
Greg Reierson's Avatar
 

Verified Member
The only surviving element of my classic Sonic rig is the digital switcher. I moved the toggle to my monitor controller. Makes A/B/C switching super simple.
Old 11th January 2017
  #80
Lives for gear
 
Paul Gold's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Happy New Year Scott. I do all my monitor switching analog. I find digital switchers really confusing. Not as confusing as sound card routing but nearly. I've tried to set digital things up so they never need changing.

This part of the thread is basically about ergonomics. How do you feel ergonomics influences the mastering process?
Old 11th January 2017
  #81
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
Geology ( specifically rock hounding )
Then possibly a Shawshank fan? You don't hear the term rock hound(ing) that often...
Old 11th January 2017
  #82
Lives for gear
 
Jerry Tubb's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
Jerry,
Since i hate to talk about myself... ha.lol

It was an interesting time to get a start in the biz. that was 1983 - 84 and digital hadn't really entered the mainstream pro studios. When it did - almost no-one knew what to do with them. Sony's Guz Skinas was the NYC rep and he would literally travel with the sony gear from session to session until the engineers and techs at each studio learned how to set the systems up and knew what to look for - Gus was very helpful.
I was the IN-House digital maven. Didn't know it at teh time .. because everything came so gradually - but i had developed some skills with this digital gear and the Studio recognized my contributions.

So - for younger EM's - that opportunity isn't there.. but similar ones are .. there are new apps and plugs and interfaces and equipment and social media platforms and ....etc.. almost everyday. So - consider how you can make your self indispensable. Don't think that once you learn the a-b-c's of recording or mastering at a school or from Youtube - that you will have a place set for you at an established studio. It takes way more than that. BUT - you can make the process go a lot faster if you can find something that the Chief doesn't like to do - and become an expert at it.
For me - it's dongles - and plug in licenses... I hate it all. the only think i liek less is passwords and locks. I've often said that a locked door only keeps out the pepl e that are Supposed to be there.. Anyone elese is wiling to break somethign to get in. Likemy car

I have multiple mdaws- PC and Macs,,, machines in multiple rooms each with licenses and different sets of plugs in various states of completion.. .. -it just make my head ache to try to describe the wasted time... just as i get things stable - and predictable - something else changes.... i need a new pc - or a new IT guy comes in and changes something unexpectedly. ... Dang - I USED to be the IT guy .. back before Windows that's right there were computers before "Windows"... They seem like fossils now but we got a lot of work done with them and in many ways they were more like workshop tools. and less like smart (ass) apps.


Anyway.. Another interesting point is that i spent just short of 10 years as an assistant / apprentice. I had a FEW of my own mastering projects - friends and low budget stuff - but that first 10 years was watching and learning and doing the daily work. I was kept very busy supporting the senior engineers. That is a LOT of listening to very high quality releases every day.
You can learn mastering just by listening. Some of the today's senior and experiences ME's started without ANY formal audio training. and no - I'm not naming names...
Others came to mastering with TON's of relevant music / production/ technical / social skills.

if i don't get questions then - i'm just going to ramble on about whatev
...
Great bio history there Scott!

The music & audio background so important imo.

And the willingness to be of service, making yourself indispensable.

As to the rigid copy protection of music software, its drives me crazy too, and seems like it mainly punishes us legal paid users, to jump through so many hoops. I remember early DAW software came on floppies with multiple installs and authorizations, easy as pie, if you had the floppy or install CD you were all set. But the multilayered internet authorization is a major pita, so,we get used to it.

Best, JT
Old 11th January 2017
  #83
Lives for gear
 
Jerry Tubb's Avatar
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post
I hate gear.... or a love to hate gear...
All of my stuff has been in my photos for years.. I even saw one room in Europe set up with ALL of the same gear as me.. ANd it wasn't a stollen photo.... Someone when shopping with my gear list - ha. ... boring but good stuff you all know well.

Sontec, Avalon, Manley, Prism converters, Weiss EQ and DS - Antelope Clocks. Muth Monitor controller. And Duntech Sovereigns 2001 with Cello Perfomance amps. - not Dunlavely's.

But if only had my speakers and a DBX Quantum ( or similar) I can do a pretty damn good job of mastering ... so - I don't spend much thought on what new gear I need. More thought goes into what i'm going to put on the grill tonight I'm Into Pork Chops right now.. without the Bar B Q sauce .. (I know that offends many of you .. i'm really sorry.. ) but "my smoker" is still just a fantasy.

Sorry - folks - I'm happy to hang with ya - but i'm not that kinda slut.
Yes! When The gear and room is all set, no need to obsess on trying everything new or different. Focus on music projects, food, and a good hobby outside the studio.

JT
Old 11th January 2017
  #84
Lives for gear
 
bcgood's Avatar
 

Verified Member
So I just got the Two Against Nature CD today. I like the sound of it overall but I will say it does sound a little sterile and digital to me, sort of flat.

I used RX to De-Clip it and then did some minor eq adjustments and some other tricks then finished it off by running it through my class A tube line level gain stage back into the Hilo.

Here's a short sample of what I did if anyone is interested to hear it. To my ears, this is what I like. Just having some fun. The track is Jack Of Speed, one of my favorites so far off of the album.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B7...m9oUmtDSVVfblk
Old 11th January 2017
  #85
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottHull View Post

Fortunately this isn't my everyday. But "At my level" doesn't really mean a lot some days. Dealing with exactly the same issues from the top to the bottom
By level I meant your expertise but also the fact that you deal with clients who make the charts, sell a sizable amount or records, have a shot at or win awards. my US clients are mostly indie or local. Although I have a hunch that not those kind of clients are the ones putting you in those kind of situations. I find that the more seasoned mixers/producers pretty much know what they want (obviously) and after polishing their mixes for weeks or months they go: this is it, do your thing, I'm done - we only change things beforehand if we discuss it and reach the conclusion it's better to address it in the mix. the ones that keep "adjusting" mixes based on the mastered outcome on the other hand are the same that send me a bunch of refs, often not even related to each other, they want this, that, to sound like those and those, but better ...they ask me what they should do ... It was discussed on Brian Lucey's tread also, there's no perfect mix, or "this is the way to do it" ...just do what you feel it will translate that emotion to your listeners; of course, easier said than done - but if the "target" is solely to copy your favorite artist ...
Coming back to what you said about "your level doesn't mean much some days" that's probably true as well - I'm more geared towards European clients, that's were I'm from so I have some that are huge in their respective countries - so not too long ago I get this gig with these guys that are legends in their respective country, started alongside the Stones and Beatles in the early 60's and they are still around with different projects - so I was, Oh, goody, I'm gonna get these nice mixes - because lets face it, none of us here, regardless of the level, get great mixes every day, right - well, guess what they've sent me - they've had released most of the tracks as singles in the last 3-4 years so I got those, in 44K 16 bit, already "mastered" by 6 different guys. Until a week before the release they thought they can just throw those together and have an album - one thing that stopped them, among other things (I hope), was that in the DIY or mixers getting things "mastered" process the acoustic tracks or ballads ended up so loud there was no way to get the other tracks as loud without totally destroying them. So I had to make the best of it - of course the first thing I asked is if they can send me the clean mixes and they said they don't have them anymore (!?! - eludes me why but nevertheless) ... so my questions (at last ) are, do you have to deal with similar stuff? what do you do? if it's 44K/16b how do you handle it? stay digital, use the analog chain? do you up-sample? leave it be and do the less possible amount of processing? - that's mainly what I did, level adjusting but even if I tried not to mess with it too much I had to do some processing, EQ tweakes, edits ... very difficult especially because I'm very anal (as all mastering engineers should be ) about things like this - If I know it could be better it bothers me that for some reason we can't get that - but if the client doesn't want to or doesn't care to go the extra mile, my hands are tied.

Last edited by mastervargas; 11th January 2017 at 12:36 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 11th January 2017
  #86
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by batlanyard View Post
Then possibly a Shawshank fan? You don't hear the term rock hound(ing) that often...
It's a very peculiar hobby - Was more of my father's pastime... I went a long for the ride and learned the way of the Rockhound.
Rock collecting for pleasure.... mineral specimens and for use in jewelry ( lapidary ) . I've probably logged 5000 hours on my way... half way to master
Old 11th January 2017
  #87
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpad View Post
Not sure if this is of interest, but one the features of Benchmark's new DAC3 is its superfast digital switching. They claim it will switch between digital inputs fast enough to do live A-B comparisons between digital source material.
That's cool. I rely on that function.
Old 11th January 2017
  #88
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastervargas View Post
By level I meant your expertise but also the fact that you deal with clients who make the charts, sell a sizable amount or records, have a shot at or win awards.
I know what you meant.. I was trying to make light of the fact that Not Every day i have a chart busting project to master..
Old 11th January 2017
  #89
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastervargas View Post
Coming back to what you said about "your level doesn't mean much some days" that's probably true as well -
There is one misconception i'd like to address. .. Even the greatest of the great ME's work on projects that are not stellar. !!

Frankly - We all more or less work on what comes through the door.
Occasionally turning down projects - but for the most part - we work on the projects that find us. We set our price based on what we perceive as industry norms.

You might think that my rate would prevent first timers from using my mastering. But more often than you think - i'm listening to someones "FIRST MIX EVER" and hoping that they have enough background knowledge to even understand my comments and advice. These folks have two different observations. 1. if i spend a lot on mastering it will make up for a non polished mix.. or 2. maybe i can get some education from a interested third party. Since mentoring is almost impossible... this is the next best way to improve your DIY skills.

I have great - Pro - Established mixers and producers as my regular clients. Some of their projects are done carefully with ample time for mix revisions and contemplation. Others are Raced through the process because of time and budget constraints.

I guess i'm just saying .. We All have projects that that define the entry level... some days.
Old 11th January 2017
  #90
Gear Nut
 

Verified Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcgood View Post
So I just got the Two Against Nature CD today. I like the sound of it overall but I will say it does sound a little sterile and digital to me, sort of flat.

I used RX to De-Clip it and then did some minor eq adjustments and some other tricks then finished it off by running it through my class A tube line level gain stage back into the Hilo.

Here's a short sample of what I did if anyone is interested to hear it. To my ears, this is what I like. Just having some fun. The track is Jack Of Speed, one of my favorites so far off of the album.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B7...m9oUmtDSVVfblk

Donald Fagan - forbid any compression.
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump