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Bored with the norm ... any questions? Effects Pedals, Units & Accessories
Old 23rd August 2016
  #1
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Bored with the norm ... any questions?

I get a lot of PMs and FB messages asking an opinion on this or that. If anyone has a specific mastering or production ? for me please post here ... hell any question you can possibly think of. Let's do it.

your sincerely,
Bored with the Norm
Old 23rd August 2016
  #2
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Why did you get into mastering?

How do most of your clients find you?

What is the most important thing you want to tell a potential client about what you are going to do to their project?

How much time does it take you, on average, to do a mastering project.

What is the one piece of equipment you could not do without in mastering.

Old 23rd August 2016
  #3
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please wax lyrical about your favourite eq. what is it, and what do you love about it?
Old 23rd August 2016
  #4
Thanks Brian! Here we go.

1- What do you really think about Hypex enconre amps? hype? are they one of the best options out there for pure hifi fast and accurate monitoring?

2- Do you know the DIY Jeff Bagby kit call Continuum ? the MT BBC LS3/5 sealed clone with the sub and, do you think is a good small system for mastering?

3- Any ear training tips or exercises you like to share?

Cheers mate
Old 23rd August 2016
  #5
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Hey Brian

I love your no nonsense, no BS, direct attitude on this board. Your views and insights (and those of other top pros) are always extremely welcome and enhance the value of this forum no end, so I'm glad you decided to be a little more active here again this past 6 months.

I'm sure we are all doing this because we love music and are a bit obsessed with audio, but personally I find it hard to switch out of critical listening mode when not working.

Do you find it hard to simply switch off and enjoy casual listening, or are you still able to kick back and enjoy an album when you're off duty?

Cheers

Conundra

Last edited by Conundra; 23rd August 2016 at 09:26 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 23rd August 2016
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
Why did you get into mastering?
How do most of your clients find you?
What is the most important thing you want to tell a potential client about what you are going to do to their project?
How much time does it take you, on average, to do a mastering project.
What is the one piece of equipment you could not do without in mastering.
Self taught, out of necessity. As a musician for 20 years, then a mixer/producer of analog tape records. I could not afford Bob Ludwig in 1996 and I didn't care for anyone else. $100/trk options were the low end, clinical and lifeless work. Once I discovered a passion for mastering I wanted to make great work affordable to people who were like me, who needed something great not for 500/trk.

Referrals, or credits. My aim has always been to exceed musical expectations so the client wants to tell their friends. A few failures over the years, but mostly glowing responses.

Fortunately these days I don't often have to sell myself, but when talking to potential new clients here in LA, "I make things cooler, while respecting great mixes, and I make people money. My aim is intimacy and connection between the artist and their widest audience. I invite people to connect, as opposed to pushing forward to force their attention, that's all done in the production. Low end and low mids are valued, harmonic life in the midrange, sufficient clarity on top but not trying too hard."

More importantly, what do YOU do for people? What is your aim? We can only say something honest about our work, better if someone else says it for us. My words are not that important.

Every job is different. Could be 10 mins a song, could take weeks. I work a record like a sculpture, looking for the essence. So non linear, skipping here and there, each song might be done 5+ times before it goes out. I might start a pass or set of passes in the pm and check in the am.

The desk is an instrument, a single unit where each piece relates to the others for an aspect of the whole. So I need them all, down to details like a certain era of EF 86 output tubes in the Fairman EQ, and certain cables. Also the Immedia Allegra speakers, which are likely a lifetime relationship also.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timesaver800W View Post
please wax lyrical about your favourite eq. what is it, and what do you love about it?
1073 for tracking, the high pass in particular. Pultecs of course. Each eq can be cool in the right context. For mastering it's the Fairman, yet it's slightly laid back tube sound needs the forward harmonics of the modified 315 mkii to even up the presentation, and I also like the control and details of the Lin Phase in Sequoia for most records. Again, the desk is one thing to me. Ideally no digital eq and no Alpha, only DA-315-Fairman-AD. That's the chain for the best records.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miguel Sound View Post
Thanks Brian! Here we go.
1- What do you really think about Hypex enconre amps? hype? are they one of the best options out there for pure hifi fast and accurate monitoring?
2- Do you know the DIY Jeff Bagby kit call Continuum ? the MT BBC LS3/5 sealed clone with the sub and, do you think is a good small system for mastering?
3- Any ear training tips or exercises you like to share?
Cheers mate
1 My time with any Class D is over. I use push pull class A amps, Cary 211 FE with upgraded tubes.
2 Sorry, no clue on that !
3 Ear training is listening from a frame of reference with a specific intention. I'm a musician, I have a grand piano and guitars, and a huge record collection, that's how I did it. Then started to look at records. Being still helps, calm, meditate, or just breathe.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Conundra View Post
Hey Brian

I love your no nonsense, no BS, direct attitude on this board. Your views and insights (and those of other top pros) are always extremely welcome and enhance the value of this forum no end, so I'm glad you decided to be a little more active here again this past 6 months.

I'm sure we are all doing this because we love music and are a bit obsessed with audio, but personally I find it hard to switch out of critical listening mode when not working.

Do you find it hard to simply switch off and enjoy casual listening, or are you still able to kick back and enjoy an album when you're off duty?

Cheers

Conundra
Thanks C. I don't listen at home for enjoyment, ears are all full by working every day. It's sports or moves/shows, or online like this, to decompress/recharge/relate to the world outside. I also like the sound of car engines and I love to go driving, to get out of the chair and iisten to a motor.

Given my room it's hard to enjoy the sound of live music. Clubs are a disaster. I'd give up on clubs except the live moment is so great that I can't. I need earplugs always, and alcohol usually. Coldplay the other night had some lovely quiet acoustic moments, outdoors at the Rose Bowl. Peter Gabriel and Sting at Hollywood Bowl was a really great vibe (with alcohol, occasional plugs). Live music reminds me of the purpose of music, which is community, and elevating the energy of each individual.

I almost like the sound of the stereo in the 2002 Audi Allroad, and have used it to check a same day major record (this does happen unfortunately).
Old 24th August 2016
  #7
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Many amateur mixers don't have the best mix environment. We can check our rooms, in our vehicles, and on phones and few other sets of speakers but it's never gonna be "right."

Should we err on the side of too much or too little low-end? Which is better to master?
Old 24th August 2016
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
Many amateur mixers don't have the best mix environment. We can check our rooms, in our vehicles, and on phones and few other sets of speakers but it's never gonna be "right."

Should we err on the side of too much or too little low-end? Which is better to master?
Neither. Like level, it's going to be adjusted either way, to some degree.

Rightness is a musical term, not a technical one. The right mix is the one that with the volume up on the monitors, brings the people in the room alive with excitement, and holds up in the car. So mix for emotional impact, and unique vision per song to suit a unique artist. Don't mix for perfection, that's not a real thing.

Cars, like Avantones, are a great place to go for real mix truth. Thinking about "low end" in the overall is a mastering issue, your main job is relationships. If you're an amazing mixer, you move into overview, but even then, each mix on each day has it's own reality per day. Overview thinking is in the way of a singular unique vision.

Think about relationships first, second and third:
K to Bass
K to Snare
Drums / Bass to Vocal
etc.
EQ cleaning and boosting, distorting, compression, etc. to give each a place and a voice

Then think about momentum:
Levels and panning to provide a theme and variation-esque composition element for the tracks.
Levels between sections (master fader auto)

What you control 100% and need to do well at mixing is the relationships and the momentum ... the unique musical voice of this one song ... and this is why you can mix well on any speakers, assuming you have things in the general ballpark for overview it will all be worked out later.

Not to say you "leave it for later" but even if you do your best, there will be tweaks to a degree, to overview. Even the very best get a tweak, it just gets more subtle the better the mixes. But it's just as impacting as there are no small moves in mastering. The better the mix, the more important each so called small move.
Old 24th August 2016
  #9
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Hey Brian, what is the loudest song you have had master? As in the client wanting it blurring loud.

Do you ever still mix projects for people? Instead of mastering?
Old 24th August 2016
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post

Every job is different. Could be 10 mins a song, could take weeks. I work a record like a sculpture, looking for the essence. So non linear, skipping here and there, each song might be done 5+ times before it goes out. I might start a pass or set of passes in the pm and check in the am.

The desk is an instrument, a single unit where each piece relates to the others for an aspect of the whole. So I need them all, down to details like a certain era of EF 86 output tubes in the Fairman EQ, and certain cables.
When you're working on one of the songs that takes weeks, do you find yourself swapping out EF 86 tube eras or do they hold up for the duration?
Old 24th August 2016
  #11
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thanks for the great replies, lucey. i personally love the sound of all-tube eq, very smooth indeed.

how do you feel about 'wideners' 'spreaders' and such? vitalizers? mults, analogue pan?
Old 24th August 2016
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post
Self taught, out of necessity. As a musician for 20 years, then a mixer/producer of analog tape records. I could not afford Bob Ludwig in 1996 and I didn't care for anyone else. $100/trk options were the low end, clinical and lifeless work. Once I discovered a passion for mastering I wanted to make great work affordable to people who were like me, who needed something great not for 500/trk.

Referrals, or credits. My aim has always been to exceed musical expectations so the client wants to tell their friends. A few failures over the years, but mostly glowing responses.

Fortunately these days I don't often have to sell myself, but when talking to potential new clients here in LA, "I make things cooler, while respecting great mixes, and I make people money. My aim is intimacy and connection between the artist and their widest audience. I invite people to connect, as opposed to pushing forward to force their attention, that's all done in the production. Low end and low mids are valued, harmonic life in the midrange, sufficient clarity on top but not trying too hard."

More importantly, what do YOU do for people? What is your aim? We can only say something honest about our work, better if someone else says it for us. My words are not that important.

Every job is different. Could be 10 mins a song, could take weeks. I work a record like a sculpture, looking for the essence. So non linear, skipping here and there, each song might be done 5+ times before it goes out. I might start a pass or set of passes in the pm and check in the am.

The desk is an instrument, a single unit where each piece relates to the others for an aspect of the whole. So I need them all, down to details like a certain era of EF 86 output tubes in the Fairman EQ, and certain cables. Also the Immedia Allegra speakers, which are likely a lifetime relationship also.


Thanks for the insightful post.
Old 24th August 2016
  #13
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Do you have any specific approach for tightening up tracks that are too boomy and lack punch? Is there a particular filter slope or eq trick that you can recommend, at least as a starting point?
Old 24th August 2016
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deuc647 View Post
Hey Brian, what is the loudest song you have had master? As in the client wanting it blurring loud.

Do you ever still mix projects for people? Instead of mastering?
Loudest song ... not sure there. I'm not often pushed by anyone experienced past my comfort zone. I tend to default to "loud yet still musical" Occasionally they want less, or occasionally a little more. Nothing too loud is released, or I have blocked it out I used to study louder records and aim to beat them in musicality at the same volume. It's tricky. To me the issue is moving drivers and not compressing too much, if at all. Midrange push and thin low end is used by many to get volume. I like low end moving drivers and low mids that are an invitation to connect, not a pushed in your face thing mid mids and high mids thing. So there is a balance to strike to get the volume for a pop record.

When I did Brothers in 2010 Dan and Pat were very clear that volume was not the goal, and the licensing and sales were hardly hurt.

No mixing for almost a decade, too busy and no interest anymore. Mixing was work, I'm good but not a great mixer. Mastering is effortless and my home. I listen to overview first, not parts.


Quote:
Originally Posted by zakco View Post
When you're working on one of the songs that takes weeks, do you find yourself swapping out EF 86 tube eras or do they hold up for the duration?
Oh no they last for 3+ years on 24/7. It's important to not change gear any more than necessary, so you can get dialed in and roll on. Subtleties then become a new world of powerful options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timesaver800W View Post
thanks for the great replies, lucey. i personally love the sound of all-tube eq, very smooth indeed.

how do you feel about 'wideners' 'spreaders' and such? vitalizers? mults, analogue pan?
The biggest mix would be 3 unique tracks panned LCR, with the L and R track high end contrasting. The same applies to mixing 10 or 100 tracks. Phase tricks don't make better mixes, better physics does, more aggressive mixing does. The punch in the center clearly defined and contrasted with the side spice of unique high end hard panned is the best way forward.

Last edited by lucey; 25th August 2016 at 01:22 AM..
Old 24th August 2016
  #15
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Wow thanks Brian, and you hit it on the head with that thin low end and pushed mid/mid high for volume, thats the first thing i noticed on the Compton album by Dr.Dre. Super super bright album
Old 25th August 2016
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deuc647 View Post
Wow thanks Brian, and you hit it on the head with that thin low end and pushed mid/mid high for volume, thats the first thing i noticed on the Compton album by Dr.Dre. Super super bright album
It's important to understand that MEs are service providers. If a major label wants a super hot record that's going to happen. Those who are critical of the ME are living a fantasy.

The freedom and art then lies in HOW it happens. I like this challenge.
Old 25th August 2016
  #17
Since I love your - at times - philosophic approach, this thread inspires me to ask this non-technical question I have for a while;

More and more I'm believing that my focus on sound (cultivated in extrema by 26 years of fulltime ME) has it's flipside outside the studio world.

At home or when going out, I get triggered by all kinds of surrounding noises, like dogs barking, neighbors, music I didn't choose to listen to, etc.
I think my mild form of tinnitus is related to this as well.

I wonder if this really is the flipside of the coin called focus on sound, or that it's 'just' my sensitivity.

Do you experience this too or how's this for you?

thanks,
Peter

Maybe this question deserves a new thread....
Old 25th August 2016
  #18
Thanks Brian, just a couple of easy ones.

1. Do you have any assistant?

2. What´s your take about using headphones for mix or mastering? I know you use the HD800, what about the AKG K712 or the HD600, any favorite in this range?
Old 26th August 2016
  #19
Hi Brian,

My question is how do you keep consistency through a project? Where do you start, how much do you reference previous tracks in the project, how much do find yourself coming back and tweaking the first few mixes of an album, and so on?

do you find yourself establishing the chain for mastering and running the whole project through it with changes, different chains per track, does it depend?

Thanks!
Old 26th August 2016
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post
If anyone has a specific mastering or production ? for me please post here ... hell any question you can possibly think of. Let's do it.
Thank you!

As an amateur artist/producer and mixer, I look back at the many stupid, uninformed and unmature things I've done.
Now, people like me seldom have the budget to use services like yours (or the musical relevance),
but then, what is the most typical amateur-errors that gets in your way,
or things that make you think: "Oh, if they just paid attention to this, then everything would turn out so much better"?
Old 27th August 2016
  #21
You build your rooms from the ground up, was there a philosophy behind your most recent build? What factors do you find most important in a playback system? I read about you're focus on musicality vs loudness.

Again, great work, brother!
Old 27th August 2016
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finetuner View Post
Since I love your - at times - philosophic approach, this thread inspires me to ask this non-technical question I have for a while; More and more I'm believing that my focus on sound (cultivated in extrema by 26 years of fulltime ME) has it's flipside outside the studio world.

At home or when going out, I get triggered by all kinds of surrounding noises, like dogs barking, neighbors, music I didn't choose to listen to, etc.
I think my mild form of tinnitus is related to this as well. I wonder if this really is the flipside of the coin called focus on sound, or that it's 'just' my sensitivity.

Do you experience this too or how's this for you?

thanks,
Peter

Maybe this question deserves a new thread....
Of course, we are all highly sensitive, and we are cultivating that at work.

Most important is having a frame of reference, and being intentional with listening. So it's a yes and no answer for me. I spend a lot of time in the world with earplugs in and have a constant awareness of the ringing that is my hourglass on the rest vs. sleep metering each day.

And yet, I make a point to not be hypersensitive all day, by intention. That's just exhausting. The whole point of my day is the right sensitivity when working, ears, body, brain, the whole thing as one. I turn it off best I can the rest of the day and recharge. Morning ears are tuned to different things than evening ears, etc.

This is something to figure out for yourself. Some people work 9-5 and have kids. That can work too. I work on and off with no schedule and no attended session, so working at peak times and then resting with sports, internet, Netflix etc. is the rest of the day. No kids and few vacations, so I'm mostly here all day every day picking the moment to strike

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miguel Sound View Post
Thanks Brian, just a couple of easy ones.
1. Do you have any assistant?
2. What´s your take about using headphones for mix or mastering? I know you use the HD800, what about the AKG K712 or the HD600, any favorite in this range?
Cate aka Button le Bouton on FB. is my part time, makes her own schedule from home, assistant. Cate is a performer, acrobat, dancer, gymnast, physical comic and creative wonder. She lives in Columbus Ohio. We Skype every day and share google docs, spreadsheeets, email, etc.

I've not listened to my HD800s in a year. Probably should sell them while they're worth something! I can't think headphones are anyone's first, second or third choice once they have built a great room, they're all a joke at that point. And the room, the reflections, the center power vs spice, that stuff is important, and is all lost on cans. However, if needed, do what you have to do

The 600s and 650s are pretty good, the Grados are at times musically interesting, the AKG 701s are clinical and could be useful. Sonys for tracking. My tastes are not that unique. HeadFi is the place to go talk cans. There are many that are ok, but really, it's not important to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Hi Brian,
My question is how do you keep consistency through a project? Where do you start, how much do you reference previous tracks in the project, how much do find yourself coming back and tweaking the first few mixes of an album, and so on? Do you find yourself establishing the chain for mastering and running the whole project through it with changes, different chains per track, does it depend?
Thanks!
As posted above (?) I use a simple analog chain for all projects, 4 pieces, plus digital eq/digital DeEss. If possible I will bypass part of that chain, or the digital eq. That's all based on the mix quality.

Consistency vs. Uniqueness is part of the decision making process. It's a musical option per record. Just yesterday I did a 10 song record with HUGE variety in the mix eq balances and the inner song dynamics. They wanted it varied so I did only a little in the first pass, then a little more homogenizing in a second pass on some tracks. Other records need a lot of unification ... either it's a style thing (metal for example has to be even) or the person is more conservative and wants cohesion. Usually those two things go together, the music we produce reflects who we are.

That level of decision making, just like feeling the impact of a song, or a section change or judging flow, things are some of the many robots will never do

Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Sun View Post
Thank you! As an amateur artist/producer and mixer, I look back at the many stupid, uninformed and unmature things I've done. Now, people like me seldom have the budget to use services like yours (or the musical relevance), but then, what is the most typical amateur-errors that gets in your way, or things that make you think: "Oh, if they just paid attention to this, then everything would turn out so much better"?
So many things matter. 1. rooms and monitoring. 2. aggressive eqing, for center power clarity and volume vs side eq and side volume. 3. mixing with mono sources, usually best. 4. volume between section (master fader) needs to move a little, not a lot. 5. LCR panning, physics is your friend. 6. parallel compression is a phase challenge even if your initials are MB. 7. Taking chances, and being unique, true to yourself. Not following trends, or mixing by technical dogmas, or listening to someone on the internet who should be ignored. (and dude, I have indie/unsigned rates that are not crazy)

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaySchmitt View Post
You build your rooms from the ground up, was there a philosophy behind your most recent build? What factors do you find most important in a playback system? I read about you're focus on musicality vs loudness. Again, great work, brother!
This room is v3 of my home studio v1. The low end escapes into the larger building, and the room itself is small, the walls are all bass trapping. I like intimacy in music and in the work space, working at low volumes in smaller spaces to avoid large/slow drivers. I kill first reflections and diffuse the back of the room. Ceiling (not very important unless the rest if great) is partly absorbing and diffusing.

The main reason I moved here was the fresh air and daylight by day ... and at night, cracking the doors pulls in fresh air (like now) and I feel like I'm sitting outside. A fire is burning in a propane can and I have smells coming in from burning things on the patio. Very refreshing.

I've done all these rooms by feel and ear, and that is not best for everyone. When I move the R38 in the ceiling with a broom handle a little push here or there changes the room. So if things are that touchy why not DIY, tweaking always needed in designed rooms.
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Last edited by lucey; 28th August 2016 at 01:15 AM..
Old 27th August 2016
  #23
Can you speak to the gain staging in the second half of your chain? Out of your analog pieces, how hard are you hitting the AD typically? L2? How how to you typically run the HEDD? Curious to hear what sounds best to you
Old 27th August 2016
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaySchmitt View Post
Can you speak to the gain staging in the second half of your chain? Out of your analog pieces, how hard are you hitting the AD typically? L2? How how to you typically run the HEDD? Curious to hear what sounds best to you
Analog gain staging is about how far you can and can't push, and how you want to push for sonics. It's all very interactive and chain dependent.

The Focusrite gain is the variable along with the Sequoia gain per track. The Focusrite has new chips (OPA 627) and a lot of caps removed. The chips probably don't vary the headroom much but maybe. It can crunch if pushed too far, but sounds good with a little push. The Alpha I don't use for gain, not a fan of the tone, and not switched and don't need it. Sits after Focusrite and before the Fairman. I'm always driving the output tubes in the Fairman by 3-4db for the sound. It's last for the sound of it last, and because it can handle the incoming hot signals better/best. Input set to 0 always. The net of the analog path is a clipped HDCD converter, probably around 4-8 db of reduction. Some peaks may be over 10db. I have no idea. I can hear when it craps out, and it's way up there. I'm always running the L2 at 1.4 .3 out .11 dual mono. Any less and it doesn't pop the mids, any more and it's a horrible limiter. The Hedd is D-to-D after the AD and L2, and barely on.
Old 27th August 2016
  #25
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Hey Brian, I have no dedicated questions atm. I just wanted to say thanks for your effort and time. Great read, as usual.
Old 27th August 2016
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post
So many things matter. 1. rooms and monitoring. 2. aggressive eqing, for center power clarity and volume vs side eq and side volume. 3. mixing with mono sources, usually best. 4. volume between section (master fader) needs to move a little, not a lot. 5. LCR panning, physics is your friend. 6. parallel compression is a phase challenge even if your initials are MB. 7. Taking chances, and being unique, true to yourself. Not following trends, or mixing by technical dogmas, or listening to someone on the internet who should be ignored. (and dude, I have indie/unsigned rates that are not crazy)
Thank you!
To understand you a little better:
2.Aggressive eq: Are you for or against aggressive eq?
4. Do you consider moving the masterfader a mix-or master-thing? Or should it be done with tracks/buses?
5. LCR. For or against?
Old 27th August 2016
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucey View Post
Analog gain staging is about how far you can and can't push, and how you want to push for sonics. It's all very interactive and chain dependent.

The Focusrite gain is the variable along with the Sequoia gain per track. The Focusrite has new chips (OPA 627) and a lot of caps removed. The chips probably don't vary the headroom much but maybe. It can crunch if pushed too far, but sounds good with a little push. The Alpha I don't use for gain, not a fan of the tone, and not switched and don't need it. Sits after Focusrite and before the Fairman. I'm always driving the output tubes in the Fairman by 3-4db for the sound. It's last for the sound of it last, and because it can handle the incoming hot signals better/best. Input set to 0 always. The net of the analog path is a clipped HDCD converter, probably around 4-8 db of reduction. Some peaks may be over 10db. I have no idea. I can hear when it craps out, and it's way up there. I'm always running the L2 at 1.4 .3 out .11 dual mono. Any less and it doesn't pop the mids, any more and it's a horrible limiter. The Hedd is D-to-D after the AD and L2, and barely on.
Brian! This is exactly the type of answer I was looking for. Great stuff, man.

Peaks clipping 10db on the HDCD converter!?!?! Holy hell! I get like less that 2 db into my prism sound without it sounding awful. Is the HDCD just that good?! Have you heard any other converter clip as well and at that level!? Jesus, man haha
Old 28th August 2016
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JP__ View Post
Hey Brian, I have no dedicated questions atm. I just wanted to say thanks for your effort and time. Great read, as usual.
Happy to share, it's easier and more enjoyable to have a conversation than post randomly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Sun View Post
Thank you!
To understand you a little better:
2.Aggressive eq: Are you for or against aggressive eq?
4. Do you consider moving the masterfader a mix-or master-thing? Or should it be done with tracks/buses?
5. LCR. For or against?
Aggressive EQ is always good, aggressive everything if needed. It's not naturalism, it's mixing. Master fader is a mixing thing, momentum is a mixing thing. If necessary I can do a tweak yet would 100% prefer to not be mixing. LCR is a powerfully clean way to mix if it works for the song, or only for the chorus, or what have you, great. If not, it's a thing to understand and experiment with. All mono tracks, all mono effects. Try it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaySchmitt View Post
Brian! This is exactly the type of answer I was looking for. Great stuff, man. Peaks clipping 10db on the HDCD converter!?!?! Holy hell! I get like less that 2 db into my prism sound without it sounding awful. Is the HDCD just that good?! Have you heard any other converter clip as well and at that level!? Jesus, man haha
Right? It's a monster. I started clipping it by mistake, and have never tested others. I'm assuming that any high headroom Class A discrete box will handle the hot signals well, as everyone uses them. It's the analog parts first, and the clock and the PSUs that matter, chips are chips.
Old 28th August 2016
  #29
Lives for gear
 

interesting, hdcd uses 'soft limiting' so not actual clipping, perhaps a combination of both? can i ask what converter you're talking about?
Old 28th August 2016
  #30
Lives for gear
 
Hermetech Mastering's Avatar
 

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What is an HDCD converter? That's the brand name or a type/model/format?
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