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unprofessional mastering technique
Old 16th January 2007
  #1
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unprofessional mastering technique

is it more common to do final compression, limiting, eq and the like on the master bus...or do you sum/bounce it to a stereo track first then do the mastering. for instance...i have typically just done final stuff on my master track, but recently i tried bouncing it unmastered, then reimporting the track and mastering then and I seemed to get better volume increases...any suggestions?
Old 16th January 2007
  #2
t_d
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i bounce/sum to 2-track and then let it sit for a few weeks before i try any additional processing... i think resting your ears from it is more important.. and working with a 2-track file in Peak is much more convenient...

if i need to, i'll go back and fix it in the mix, and then re-bounce to a 2-track...

but, either way, give yourself and your ears some time away from it, if you're going to do it yourself.. so you can get a fresher perspective..

Quote:
Originally Posted by joemail75 View Post
is it more common to do final compression, limiting, eq and the like on the master bus...or do you sum/bounce it to a stereo track first then do the mastering. for instance...i have typically just done final stuff on my master track, but recently i tried bouncing it unmastered, then reimporting the track and mastering then and I seemed to get better volume increases...any suggestions?
Old 16th January 2007
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joemail75 View Post
<edit>i have typically just done final stuff on my master track, but recently i tried bouncing it unmastered, then reimporting the track and mastering then and I seemed to get better volume increases...any suggestions?
If you are working for other people (as opposed to working on your own project), doing the latter is essential.

Around here, we get numerous requests from people to "check their masters" to see if the work was done as well as possible. Usually, these folks have had their mastering work done by their mix engineers who offered to master the project.

The scenario is that either they, or someone they played the master for, didn't think the work was done as well as it could be and now they are considering hiring a mastering engineer to redo the album.

Once I get through the evaluation with the client, and presuming they decide to remaster, my first question is "...do you have the mix files?". It is surprising how many times the answer is (after asking pointed questions and perhaps even having to call the engineer) is that the mix and master was done as one.

Of course this makes mastering very difficult as the audio has been essentially degraded, usually with a bunch of digital "mastering" plug ins.

So my point here for mix engineers who are being paid to mix and then master, please do your clients a favour and give them both the mix and master files when you are done. That way, if they decide to remaster, they have the material and the mastering guy they hired doesn't have to get on the phone with the engineer only to find out there are no mix files!
Old 16th January 2007
  #4
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Krehm View Post
If you are working for other people (as opposed to working on your own project), doing the latter is essential.

Around here, we get numerous requests from people to "check their masters" to see if the work was done as well as possible. Usually, these folks have had their mastering work done by their mix engineers who offered to master the project.

The scenario is that either they, or someone they played the master for, didn't think the work was done as well as it could be and now they are considering hiring a mastering engineer to redo the album.

Once I get through the evaluation with the client, and presuming they decide to remaster, my first question is "...do you have the mix files?". It is surprising how many times the answer is (after asking pointed questions and perhaps even having to call the engineer) is that the mix and master was done as one.

Of course this makes mastering very difficult as the audio has been essentially degraded, usually with a bunch of digital "mastering" plug ins.

So my point here for mix engineers who are being paid to mix and then master, please do your clients a favour and give them both the mix and master files when you are done. That way, if they decide to remaster, they have the material and the mastering guy they hired doesn't have to get on the phone with the engineer only to find out there are no mix files!
What he said...

That is to say, I agree.
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