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-14 LUFS is it recommended?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Gear Nut
 

-14 LUFS is it recommended?

Hi,
I read that the recommend LUFS today for YouTube, Spotify, Apple Music is -14LUFS so I check a few songs.
I downloaded from YouTube 2 songs (MP3) to check the LUFS "Watermelon Suger - Harry Style" and "My oh my - Camila Cabello" both reach to -10-7LUFS.
So what is the recommend LUFS -14 or -9?



Thanks!
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-14 LUFS is it recommended?-screen-shot-2020-10-17-8.48.16-pm.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Gear Nut
 
darkalex's Avatar
Literally the second pinned thread on this forum bro..

Targeting Mastering Loudness for Streaming (LUFS, Spotify, YouTube)-Why NOT to do it.

Anyways, short answer: No. Do not target anything for your music except for its musicality, certain genres need “loudness” to sound good, rock, hip hop, pop etc.

Make it loud until you have to sacrifice musicality, as for major label tracks being super loud, yup you guessed it right, the loudness wars are still active.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by darkalex View Post
Literally the second pinned thread on this forum bro..

Targeting Mastering Loudness for Streaming (LUFS, Spotify, YouTube)-Why NOT to do it.

Anyways, short answer: No. Do not target anything for your music except for its musicality, certain genres need “loudness” to sound good, rock, hip hop, pop etc.

Make it loud until you have to sacrifice musicality, as for major label tracks being super loud, yup you guessed it right, the loudness wars are still active.
Thanks! I'm new to mastering where can I find tips and tricks to get volume without destroying my song?
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
IIRC Youtube normalises everything that's louder than -14 LUFS to -14 LUFS. The level adjustment happens at playback - if you download a video, you get original loudness.
For Youtube, there is IMO no point of reducing the dynamic range just to achieve loudness above -14 LUFS. This doesn't mean that you should strive for higher dynamic range than a specific song requires.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Nut
 
darkalex's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by aviorrok View Post
Thanks! I'm new to mastering where can I find tips and tricks to get volume without destroying my song?
Short answer: The most important part is proper EQing of the whole mix to maintain the frequency balance, then some compression, if required, to smooth out the dynamics, followed by (soft) clipping for all those nasty uncontrolled transients and limiting for the final 2-3dB of loudness.

Long answer:
Man I'm gonna sound like a jerk and give you the 'standard' reply: getting volume is not something like a plugin you put on your mixbus increase the gain and done, it's much more complicated than it and takes quite a lot of practice to nail it, to make a track loud without sounding squashed.

Such loud mastering requires proper equalization of the frequency spectrum and great mix balance in the first place, if the mix has it, it's very easy to get the level.

Also mastering is very genre dependent, crushing a Rock track is very, very different from an EDM track.

So if you can, then please post a clip of some mix of yours or any project where you want to get the loudness on, without knowing the proper genre and the quality of mix you're working on, it's very difficult to recommend anything "concrete", you need to know how these tools work, it's all the same you have the same plugins as the big me's, it's just they know how to use them, how much to use them and if at all to use them.

If you know what you're doing it's very easy to achieve the results.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by darkalex View Post
Short answer: The most important part is proper EQing of the whole mix to maintain the frequency balance, then some compression, if required, to smooth out the dynamics, followed by (soft) clipping for all those nasty uncontrolled transients and limiting for the final 2-3dB of loudness.

Long answer:
Man I'm gonna sound like a jerk and give you the 'standard' reply: getting volume is not something like a plugin you put on your mixbus increase the gain and done, it's much more complicated than it and takes quite a lot of practice to nail it, to make a track loud without sounding squashed.

Such loud mastering requires proper equalization of the frequency spectrum and great mix balance in the first place, if the mix has it, it's very easy to get the level.

Also mastering is very genre dependent, crushing a Rock track is very, very different from an EDM track.

So if you can, then please post a clip of some mix of yours or any project where you want to get the loudness on, without knowing the proper genre and the quality of mix you're working on, it's very difficult to recommend anything "concrete", you need to know how these tools work, it's all the same you have the same plugins as the big me's, it's just they know how to use them, how much to use them and if at all to use them.

If you know what you're doing it's very easy to achieve the results.
I’m new to mastering but not new to music production and mixing, I still don’t understand why mastering need a EQ, if I have a good balanced mix why I need to destroy the song with EQ on master.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by aviorrok View Post
I’m new to mastering but not new to music production and mixing, I still don’t understand why mastering need a EQ, if I have a good balanced mix why I need to destroy the song with EQ on master.
If the mix is perfectly balanced, it doesn't need any EQ. If you are "mastering" your own mixes, you probably already did the EQ-ing to the best of your ability while mixing - probably no need for additional EQ-ing, unless you applied some dynamic processing that also changed the tonal balance and you want to correct this.

The thing is that proper mastering studios generally have above-average monitoring systems, mastering engineers know their rooms very well and most importantly they have a fresh set of ears that can catch some imperfections that were missed while mixing. Since it's very hard to get a mix to such a high standard that it can't be improved, EQ-ing is usually done in mastering.

If I'm "mastering" stuff that I've mixed (which I prefer not to do, although budgets too often make me do it) I usually don't do any EQ-ing.
Old 6 days ago
  #8
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jetam View Post
If the mix is perfectly balanced, it doesn't need any EQ. If you are "mastering" your own mixes, you probably already did the EQ-ing to the best of your ability while mixing - probably no need for additional EQ-ing, unless you applied some dynamic processing that also changed the tonal balance and you want to correct this.

The thing is that proper mastering studios generally have above-average monitoring systems, mastering engineers know their rooms very well and most importantly they have a fresh set of ears that can catch some imperfections that were missed while mixing. Since it's very hard to get a mix to such a high standard that it can't be improved, EQ-ing is usually done in mastering.

If I'm "mastering" stuff that I've mixed (which I prefer not to do, although budgets too often make me do it) I usually don't do any EQ-ing.
Thank you!
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