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Mastering in studio one
Old 18th July 2019
  #1
Mastering in studio one

I would like to try some mastering in studio one.
What would be the best way to do it? I will want to master a couple of songs at once. Also when I use a limiter to get it louder it adds to many artifacts to the mix. I like the mix the way it is changes it to much. I mix at about -12 from 0.
I am a begginner in this thanks.
Old 19th July 2019
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by spektor View Post
I would like to try some mastering in studio one.
What would be the best way to do it? I will want to master a couple of songs at once. Also when I use a limiter to get it louder it adds to many artifacts to the mix. I like the mix the way it is changes it to much. I mix at about -12 from 0.
I am a begginner in this thanks.
This question has endless answers. There are TRILLIONS of ways you can master in studio one. Each song will be mastered differently, So now that you know this, you may want to start leaning the art of mastering. As it is an art. So no set things to do, you do what ever is needed to get it right. There fore, no set things to tell you to do as your question is very broad and had a TRILLION different answers. 1,000 page books have been written on this subject and years if not decades of leaning go into it.

This question you are asking is compared to asking someone the best way to paint a painting. Each artist and each painting is different, the same goes for every mastering engineer and every mix to be mastered.

The same mix mastered by 50 different mastering engineers will have over 150 different techniques and effects used and all 50 outcomes can be professional sounding.

This is my advice, learn the art of mastering. but before you learn that, you need to start form he beginning and learn recording and mixing first, as those things carry over into mastering.

To answer your specific question about your limiter use:
If you are getting artifacts form a limiter you are using, then change the settings or do not use it or check your gain stages and LUFS, RMS, short and long term dB peaks. Do you know what each setting in a limiter does to the audio signal? Learn those first. its just like a compressor
Old 19th July 2019
  #3
Thanks for replying i been tracking and mixing a while. I was interested in Mastering to understand it more. I tired to Master some of my own work. But it is changing the mix and that is not making me happy. I like a lot of head room. And the more i push it it loses it.
Old 19th July 2019
  #4
Quote:
I like a lot of head room. And the more i push it it loses it.
That is the normal operation of a limiter, the more you push it, the more you squash it. Mastering is not putting a limiter on the master bus and pushing it hard

You have to analyze the entire mix and an environment that is tuned and/or that your ears are trained to so you can pick out the nulls and excessive peaks in the frequency range for that specif mix.
Also, the RMS, LUFS and short term peaks need to be evaluated and adjusted accordingly.

Everything done in the mastering stage should be subtle. Nothing drastic.
Old 19th July 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
 
SmoothTone's Avatar
 

CJ, you wasted all those words on being superior when you could have just been helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spektor View Post
I would like to try some mastering in studio one.
What would be the best way to do it? I will want to master a couple of songs at once. Also when I use a limiter to get it louder it adds to many artifacts to the mix. I like the mix the way it is changes it to much. I mix at about -12 from 0.
I am a begginner in this thanks.
I can't speak to mastering in StudioOne specifically, but I understand it has a project mode for this purpose and it looks like SoS has a good tutorial on it.

In terms of limiting, the challenge is always in trying to make it as transparent as possible. The mix itself, the chosen limiter, and how it interacts with the mix will determine how far you can push it. Most limiters will start to sound bad beyond 2-3dB of gain reduction, but a lot depends on the mix.

It's helpful to have a limiter that locks the output gain to the input/threshold. This way you can listen to the impact as you drive it. Take it to the point where it starts to change the mix and then back it off a bit.

If you need to go louder, then that's when the fun starts. You can tweak the settings to try to make it more transparent, try a different limiter that works better with this mix, try a combination of 2 limiters or introduce a clipping stage. Limiting may highlight some problems with the mix that you need to go back and address.

I usually like to start by pushing my final limiter into heavy gain reduction, tweak the settings to make it as transparent as possible then back it off and/or add another processor in front.

Overall, mastering is mostly about listening. Just sit and listen to the mix and if something distracts you from enjoying the music, address it. Or if you feel something can be enhanced to make the music more enjoyable, do it. It's much harder to do this with your own mixes, but that is goal.

Hope that helps a bit.
Old 19th July 2019
  #6
Thank you all. I understand it is about hearing and trying not to fix anything at all. I finish my mix at about -12 from 0. So when trying to get to to -10 or -8 is hard with a limiter. I understand using about 3 DB of gain reduction but it is not enough level. Or do i use 2 limiters using a db here and there?
Old 20th July 2019
  #7
Quote:
I understand using about 3 DB of gain reduction but it is not enough level. Or do i use 2 limiters using a db here and there?
There are no set dB numbers for gain reduction and i would never use 2 limiters. Mastering is not just about throwing a limiter on the master bus and adding 3dB of gain reduction as i stated in my other post. You need to analyze the mix first. Then decide your course of action(s)
Quote:
CJ, you wasted all those words on being superior when you could have just been helpful.
I can say the same for all your post Are you the 'Helpfull' police?? did you elect yourself?? Or do you just like being a jerk?
Old 20th July 2019
  #8
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
This question has endless answers. There are TRILLIONS of ways you can master in studio one. Each song will be mastered differently, So now that you know this, you may want to start leaning the art of mastering. As it is an art. So no set things to do, you do what ever is needed to get it right. There fore, no set things to tell you to do as your question is very broad and had a TRILLION different answers. 1,000 page books have been written on this subject and years if not decades of leaning go into it.

This question you are asking is compared to asking someone the best way to paint a painting. Each artist and each painting is different, the same goes for every mastering engineer and every mix to be mastered.

The same mix mastered by 50 different mastering engineers will have over 150 different techniques and effects used and all 50 outcomes can be professional sounding.

This is my advice, learn the art of mastering. but before you learn that, you need to start form he beginning and learn recording and mixing first, as those things carry over into mastering.

To answer your specific question about your limiter use:
If you are getting artifacts form a limiter you are using, then change the settings or do not use it or check your gain stages and LUFS, RMS, short and long term dB peaks. Do you know what each setting in a limiter does to the audio signal? Learn those first. its just like a compressor
Actually if you learn the art of arranging, performing and mixing then there will be virtually nothing to do at the "Mastering" stage!!!

Quote:
The same mix mastered by 50 different mastering engineers will have over 150 different techniques and effects used and all 50 outcomes can be professional sounding.
For me and my productions I feel a great mix needs virtually no EQ - ideally a flat transfer - a touch of mastering compression (maybe) a touch of limiting (maybe) ..... when I'm mastering my productions it's a technical process not an artistic one, the artistic part has been imparted at the stages prior to mastering.

But hey maybe I'm a purist - and not many take my approach to mixing - I do agree there's a lot of different approaches out there.

Last edited by thehightenor; 20th July 2019 at 07:58 PM..
Old 20th July 2019
  #9
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by spektor View Post
I would like to try some mastering in studio one.
What would be the best way to do it? I will want to master a couple of songs at once. Also when I use a limiter to get it louder it adds to many artifacts to the mix. I like the mix the way it is changes it to much. I mix at about -12 from 0.
I am a begginner in this thanks.
Try this.

Mix so that when you have finished your mix it sounds exactly the way you want it to sound.

It has all the magic you want
All the energy you want.
All the vibe you want.
All the excitement you want.

Right there in the mix.

If it doesn't have those things in the mix - you aren't going to get them from "mastering" without introducing all those artefacts you are finding you don't like.

When I have finished a mix, it literally sounds exactly how I want it to sound - if it doesn't then something went wrong at an early stage - then when it comes to "mastering"

I have three tools.

EQ
Mastering Compression
Limiter.

I will maybe only use a couple of these tools - it depends as i assemble my album.

But the EQ will be moves of +/- 0.5db.
Mastering compression of 1dB GR
Limiting of 3dB max GR.

Light, light touches - anymore than that and I'm re-visiting my mixes, not ruining my stereo mix with
compromise "mastering" techniques, trying to "Post-mix" a stereo file.

No MBC, no widening M&S tomfoolery, no drastic EQ - no way - not on a stereo file!!
Old 20th July 2019
  #10
Gear Maniac
 
drsaamah's Avatar
@op, I don't mean to attack you but the way your questions are posed imply that maybe there is a little more you could learn about production and mixing before tackling mastering. I am assuming you are talking in dbFS but even then you say that you are trying to get the mix to -10 to -8 dB (again, FS??) using a limiter. Are you talking RMS values? Or maybe LUFS? I would second what @ cjm astering said and maybe take some time to really really study mixing. Not to insult you, but to be helpful. Everything you learn about mixing will only benefit you when it comes time to mastering. If you're just looking for a cheap and fast way to polish your tracks, there are plugins that insta-Master. My friend uses one by Ozone. For something that reduces an art down to automated process it gets okay results (I guess )
Old 21st July 2019
  #11
Thank you all for the replys. Again I am all about mixing but i just want to learn some simple mastering since i do not want to change the mix much. Thank you
Old 4th August 2019
  #12
Quote:
Originally Posted by spektor View Post
Thank you all for the replys. Again I am all about mixing but i just want to learn some simple mastering since i do not want to change the mix much. Thank you
Mastering, for me, is about identifying opportunities to improve both the sonic and emotional impact of the material, establishing specific goals and having the knowledge, tools and techniques to achieve those goals.

Loudness, in mastering, is a function of gain staging, energy (re)distribution, dynamic range optimization and transient manipulation.

In addition to targeting an actual (measured) loudness level, mastering focuses on perceived loudness. This is an important distinction, as adjustments to perceived loudness may not correlate to changes in the actual loudness level.

Chasing loudness with a limiter, in my opinion, is an exercise in futility.

Respectfully,

Simon
Old 7th August 2019
  #13
Thank you for sharing
Old 11th August 2019
  #14
Quote:
Actually if you learn the art of arranging, performing and mixing then there will be virtually nothing to do at the "Mastering" stage!!!
LOL, NO!! jUST WORNG! If you learn the art of arranging and mixing, then you will make great arrangements and mixes. Mixing is not mastering and arranging is not mastering.
GOOGLE IT, if you do not believe me
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