The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
I was curious why my waveforms looked
Old 1st September 2018
  #1
Lives for gear
 

I was curious why my waveforms looked

I was curious as to how some of my favourite songs/albums, when analyzed, have waveforms that don't fully brickwall near 0dbFS on every transient. When zoomed out they look less like a dreaded "sausage" as they don't completely flatten out uniformly across time, as though something is catching the peaks but it's certainly not digital limiting.

I know, it is utterly pointless to care about how a song looks, so forgive me as I indulge this curiosity. I know I'll get a lot of facepalms for this.

So anyway, this is what I mean by flattening out - A piece of my track with limiting (yes it's hitting 0dbFS, excuse that):

I was curious why my waveforms looked-brickwall.jpg


And here is the same piece after my little experiment:
I was curious why my waveforms looked-softclip.jpg

The difference is a soft clipper AFTER the limiter.

So is that how "the big guys" do it? Is that like when they "clip the converter" or some such? Because a lot of my favourite albums LOOK more like the second waveform, not the first.

In terms of sound, there's a -0.2db average difference on the softclipped one. The extra softclipping seems to add a slight cohesion ("glue") between elements yet also a slight loss in cleanliness - sounds a little flatter dynamically and not quite as wide and open. Expected side effects I guess.

Sorry to waste your time!
Attached Thumbnails
I was curious why my waveforms looked-softclip.jpg   I was curious why my waveforms looked-brickwall.jpg  
Old 7th September 2018
  #2
Quote:
So is that how "the big guys" do it? Is that like when they "clip the converter"
As far as asking how 'the big guys' do it. I'm sure every mastered song you hear will have different settings and effects/processes done to it. There is no set way to do things like this.

When you are mastering a song, you only do what it needs and you should only be doing subtle things to it.
Quote:
In terms of sound, there's a -0.2db average difference on the softclipped one. The extra softclipping seems to add a slight cohesion ("glue") between elements yet also a slight loss in cleanliness - sounds a little flatter dynamically and not quite as wide and open. Expected side effects I guess.
You are getting a -0.2dB less than the original after you soft clip because that is the way YOU set the soft clipper. You can have any dB level after soft clipping as long as you set it that way.
As far as sounding not as wide, its probably in your head, as a soft clipper doesn't effect the stereo field.

A soft clipper is just like having a limiter set very fast and i like it for different instruments, not the whole song. Drums sound good when soft clipped the right way. Sometimes ill send them all to a bus or i will just clip the snare and kick. What ever i think makes the best sound for that song i am working on.
Old 9th September 2018
  #3
This also looks like EQ cuts after a hard limit.... (live recording)
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump