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How to Pronounce Equations for Physics?
Old 5th October 2017
  #1
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How to Pronounce Equations for Physics?

I entered the above title, (How to Pronounce Equations for Physics?) and I thought I hit the jack-pot: the very first link went to, "Cambridge Dictionary!" Sadly, the entry told me how to pronounce, "Equation" in 'American English' and 'British English.' I already knew that; still, I appreciated the effort.

What I need is a pronunciation guide to symbols. For example, "ψi" but with the "i" as a subscript. However, I can't remember how to change an "i" to a subscript "i" (I think I had an Amiga program that could translate it for me, and that's buried in the attic). Using a plain "i," I tried three Microsoft Voices: David, Hazel and Zira. 'David' and 'Zira' say "ψi" as a "Z" followed quickly by an "I." (Lazy 'Hazel' just says a "Z.") I use the free, "Balabolka" engine, but as I understand speaking platforms, the Voice determines the sound, not the engine. I could be wrong, of course.

I know this may seem esoteric to some, but if I can make a set of lyrics containing high-end equations actually work, it might be cool. Or not. Any ideas?
Old 5th October 2017
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney View Post
I entered the above title, (How to Pronounce Equations for Physics?) and I thought I hit the jack-pot: the very first link went to, "Cambridge Dictionary!" Sadly, the entry told me how to pronounce, "Equation" in 'American English' and 'British English.' I already knew that; still, I appreciated the effort.

What I need is a pronunciation guide to symbols. For example, "ψi" but with the "i" as a subscript. However, I can't remember how to change an "i" to a subscript "i" (I think I had an Amiga program that could translate it for me, and that's buried in the attic). Using a plain "i," I tried three Microsoft Voices: David, Hazel and Zira. 'David' and 'Zira' say "ψi" as a "Z" followed quickly by an "I." (Lazy 'Hazel' just says a "Z.") I use the free, "Balabolka" engine, but as I understand speaking platforms, the Voice determines the sound, not the engine. I could be wrong, of course.

I know this may seem esoteric to some, but if I can make a set of lyrics containing high-end equations actually work, it might be cool. Or not. Any ideas?
Do you understand phonetic symbology? If not, you might need to research that first, but then how about trying a scientific dictionary? Or even Wikipedia.
Old 5th October 2017
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by littleeden View Post
Do you understand phonetic symbology? If not, you might need to research that first, but then how about trying a scientific dictionary? Or even Wikipedia.
Thanks.

Years ago, Ms Whatsername in the 5th grade projected slides of 'words' upside down very quickly on and off. They looked different from regular symbols. I think I remember the smell of the projector (I know it used a very large and bright lamp that got hotter than the lamp in the 16mm film projector), and I think I remember the term 'phonics.' Spent one or two weeks for an hour before (or was it after?) lunch.

Was that phonetic symbology?
Old 5th October 2017
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney View Post
Thanks....

Was that phonetic symbology?
No, phonetic, or phonemic symbols are internationally recognised symbols that describe the pronunciation of words (you'll often see them in brackets after a word in a dictionary). See here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intern...glish_dialects
Old 6th October 2017
  #5
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Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney View Post
if I can make a set of lyrics containing high-end equations actually work, it might be cool. Or not. Any ideas?
I have an idea on whether those lyrics might be cool or not, but I don't think that's what you're asking...
Old 6th October 2017
  #6
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I Have a Thick Skin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
I have an idea on whether those lyrics might be cool or not, but I don't think that's what you're asking...

Sure, why not say what you think. I co-wrote a song about Aspergers (even using the word repeated in the chorus), another, about a 10 foot tall dead bear, and another about not worrying too much about conspiracy theories. They all have been played in public - and not played by me. And even get applause.
Old 6th October 2017
  #7
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Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney View Post
Sure, why not say what you think. I co-wrote a song about Aspergers (even using the word repeated in the chorus), another, about a 10 foot tall dead bear, and another about not worrying too much about conspiracy theories. They all have been played in public - and not played by me. And even get applause.
^^^Those all sound like very cool ideas to me! Especially a tune with a chorus of "Aspergers! Aspergers! Aspergers!" Good stuff.
Old 6th October 2017
  #8
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabney View Post
I entered the above title, (How to Pronounce Equations for Physics?) and I thought I hit the jack-pot: the very first link went to, "Cambridge Dictionary!" Sadly, the entry told me how to pronounce, "Equation" in 'American English' and 'British English.' I already knew that; still, I appreciated the effort.

What I need is a pronunciation guide to symbols. For example, "ψi" but with the "i" as a subscript. However, I can't remember how to change an "i" to a subscript "i" (I think I had an Amiga program that could translate it for me, and that's buried in the attic). Using a plain "i," I tried three Microsoft Voices: David, Hazel and Zira. 'David' and 'Zira' say "ψi" as a "Z" followed quickly by an "I." (Lazy 'Hazel' just says a "Z.") I use the free, "Balabolka" engine, but as I understand speaking platforms, the Voice determines the sound, not the engine. I could be wrong, of course.

I know this may seem esoteric to some, but if I can make a set of lyrics containing high-end equations actually work, it might be cool. Or not. Any ideas?

VERY SIMPLE. Just learn your greak alphabet ... if you want to do such typography on the computer you'll need to use LaTeX etc. As for how to say a subscript just say (for example) 'epsilon sub phi'

https://www.latex-project.org/
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