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Help w/setting up home studio
Old 15th December 2006
  #1
Gear Head
 

Help w/setting up home studio

Hello,

I'm new and I've been reading the posts for a while, I've learned a lot and really appreciate the community that is present on the site.

That being said, I'm looking for some advice. I'm looking to start a small home studio where I charge clients a reasonable hourly rate, somewhere between $15-25 an hour. I have two rooms, both pretty good size, w/wood floors. I want to set the place up as a production style environment, where I only record a few tracks at a time, no live drums-but everything that I record is at a high level of quality.

Currently, I have an M-audio 410 and Pro Tools M-Powered (pc), Dynaudio bm 5a monitors, Rode ntk, Rode nt2000, Focusrite Trackmaster Pro. I want to junk the 410, and get the ProFire, an RME AD-2, and maybe a presonus digimax. Does this sound like a reasonable starting point? Would I be able to get truly professional results? Any suggestions would greatly appreciated.

Here is a rough list of the in the box stuff I've got: Waves Platinum, Waves SSl, URS EQ pack, Urs Comp, Altiverb, Bombfactory plugs. I also have a couple hundred gigs of instrument samples, east west quantum leap, gary garritan, kontact 2, spectrasonics stuff, rmx ect.
Old 16th December 2006
  #2
Lives for Jesus
 
stevep's Avatar
Question

Quote:
That being said, I'm looking for some advice. I'm looking to start a small home studio where I charge clients a reasonable hourly rate, somewhere between $15-25 an hour.
Please ..... charge at least 40 or 50 $$$ an hour

You need to be able to offer something that they dont already have at home
if your "studio" is only worth 20$ an hour why would someone not just record it on there own setup at home

There are many bedroom studios who charge 40 $ pr song


Why ? ........................





.
Old 16th December 2006
  #3
Gear Addict
 
ricknaqvi's Avatar
 

If you have 2 rooms with wood floors and you won't have the cops called because of noise, then you already have more than most people have at home.

Regarding your gear:
I've heard people make great music with a lot less gear than you have. So if you know how to work with people and operate the gear you have, then you will do great and people will come to you.

Regarding your rate: I think it depends a lot on your market. I'm in Baton Rouge (not a huge city) and there are several *pro* non-home studios charging $40-50 an hour. So that makes it harder for people to justify that type of a rate for a home studio here.

However, another way to do it that might work out is charging by the song. But beware - I've worked with clients that really took advantage of this. You should really spell out what that means. Like maybe say:

$200 per song (4-6 hours)

Then if someone slips an hour or two, you can be a bro and let them slide. But at the same time you won't spend a week just because some 'diva' artist hates their voice and wants to recut vocals 20 times.
Old 16th December 2006
  #4
Lives for gear
 
roxxon's Avatar
 

No live drums?
Why?
If it's a noise issue, can't you build a sound-proofed drum booth?
Old 16th December 2006
  #5
Lives for gear
 
statikcat's Avatar
I think your idea is good to start with. Your gear is usable but you should plan on investing your income back into new gear so you can overtime start charging more $$ as you get more gear, credability and experience. One thing I would do though is RETURN or sell the Focusrite Twintrak. That preamp for the $$ is REALLY bad. I tracked a session with it and it sounded tinny and horrid. Get a RNP/RNC or Joe Meek 2ch.. they will sound MUCH better trust me. Other than that I think you are heading in the right direction. 20-25$ an hour for you gear is reasonable for most locations.
Old 16th December 2006
  #6
Gear Head
 

I just got the twintrack for $350, cheap. Still worth getting rid of? My plan was to save up and get something like the Focusrite ISA 220, one really good mic, and good d/a and pitch the studio as someplace where a client could get professional results in a multitrack type of way.

About the drums, any suggestions for a resonably inexpensive way to isolate them?
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