The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Please explain how the "New York Trick" works?
Old 25th August 2006
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
Stress Man's Avatar
 

Please explain how the "New York Trick" works?

Please explain how the "New York " drum compression trick works?

thanks

Stress


If you can please also explain how the PSA-1 & compressor are used and what settings are involved.
Old 25th August 2006
  #2
As it was explained to me when I was a lad... you send a copy of the drum submix to a bus, you compress the HELL out of it, really totally squash it beyond recognition, and then you gradually creep that fader up. I think the idea is that the detail of all the attacks of everything lend a heighened realism to the real, mixed drums.

So you creep that fader up, not to the point that you can hear it, really, just to the point that it enhances the "real" drum submix.
Old 25th August 2006
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
mdsmith64's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
As it was explained to me when I was a lad... you send a copy of the drum submix to a bus, you compress the HELL out of it, really totally squash it beyond recognition, and then you gradually creep that fader up. I think the idea is that the detail of all the attacks of everything lend a heighened realism to the real, mixed drums.

So you creep that fader up, not to the point that you can hear it, really, just to the point that it enhances the "real" drum submix.

I use this trick...it works! I never knew it had a special name. It's very easy to try....


Best Regards,

Mike.
Old 25th August 2006
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Harley-OIART's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
As it was explained to me when I was a lad... you send a copy of the drum submix to a bus, you compress the HELL out of it, really totally squash it beyond recognition, and then you gradually creep that fader up. I think the idea is that the detail of all the attacks of everything lend a heighened realism to the real, mixed drums.

So you creep that fader up, not to the point that you can hear it, really, just to the point that it enhances the "real" drum submix.
Add to it (the squashed track your mixing in) :

Low Shelf @ 100Hz & Boost to Taste

High Shelf @ 10-12KHz & Boost to Taste

(Thats what I was told anyway...)
Old 25th August 2006
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Chris's Avatar
Isn't this just really drastic parallel compression?
Old 26th August 2006
  #6
Gear Addict
 
Jenre's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Isn't this just really drastic parallel compression?
yes
Old 26th August 2006
  #7
Gear Maniac
 

I often use this live actualy.. I often mix christian youth events.. where they tend to have "just the Drumms!" moments :p.. I almost always have a nuked subgroup of the drumms in reserve for those situations :p

normal parralel compression can be great though.. just don't go to overboard with it . It's a great way to get some of the colour of a compressor out there without removing all the dynamic from the drumms!
Old 27th August 2006
  #8
Gear Nut
 
B. Williams's Avatar
 

I gotta try this techinique. Sounds real interesting.....
Old 27th August 2006
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Isn't this just really drastic parallel compression?
as has been said--yep, and it's not just for drums! (although drums are certainly a great place to use this technique)

try sending a bus of all the guitars (or maybe just the rhythm guitars, or maybe just the guitars in the choruses) to the compressor. or maybe bus the kick and bass together........or maybe all of the backing vocals.......or bus everything in a similar/certain frequency range (maybe the mids--keys, vox, snare, guitars, etc)......or maybe send the kick/bass to multiple compression busses, each compressed differently or by different compressors......

.....the possibilities are truly endless. and it can certainly get out of hand.

like joel said, when done properly, the beauty of this technique is that since you're compressing busses rather than directly affecting the tracks themselves, you retain the timbre and dynamics of the original tracks (which were probably tracked with a "sonic intent" in mind) while adding "girth" or "texture" (or whatever your intent) via the compressed bus.

of course, define "when done properly". heh have fun!


cheers,
wade
Old 31st August 2006
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Jimbo's Avatar
Bobby Owsinski

The Mixing Engineer's Handbook (Owsinski) has a good explanation of this technique, and a little background on it too, I believe.

- Jim
Old 5th September 2006
  #11
Lives for gear
 
max cooper's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Isn't this just really drastic parallel compression?
Yeah, and it's great.

I always thought the "New York Trick" was a girl named Roxie who I met at The Temple Bar.
Old 11th September 2006
  #12
Gear Head
 

I read the Owsinski bit on drum compression, and he does explain it pretty well. What ratio, attack and release suggestions would you recommend as starting points for this trick?

The first time I tried it I ended up liking the new compressed track better as a replacement rather than as a low-volume add-on, which was great, but I'd like to get a better handle on this "trick" for future use.
Old 11th September 2006
  #13
Lives for gear
 
firby's Avatar
 

I do it all the time. Just strap your compressor across a group and go for it. Then when the drum break comes solo the group and push the group faders up and unsolo when the band comes in.

Hey!
Old 11th September 2006
  #14
Lives for gear
 
AlexLakis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
Isn't this just really drastic parallel compression?
Yes, but like us Greeks, New Yorkers believe they invented everything.

Try boosting the lows and highs before or after squashing it. Sometimes one will work better than the other. Most times I don't use EQ, tho.
Old 11th September 2006
  #15
Lives for gear
 
juicylime's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by max cooper View Post
Yeah, and it's great.

I always thought the "New York Trick" was a girl named Roxie who I met at The Temple Bar.
THE Temple Bar here in Dublin?!
Old 12th September 2006
  #16
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by juicylime View Post
THE Temple Bar here in Dublin?!
First thing I thought too haha
Old 12th September 2006
  #17
Lives for gear
 
max cooper's Avatar
 

http://www.templebarnyc.com/



remember that the parallel compression trick also works with effects, eq, etc.
Old 13th September 2006
  #18
Lives for gear
 
Bob Ross's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gavin View Post
What ratio, attack and release suggestions would you recommend as starting points for this trick?

The first time I tried it I ended up liking the new compressed track better as a replacement rather than as a low-volume add-on, which was great, but I'd like to get a better handle on this "trick" for future use.

Since you don't need to compromise the compression to allow transients through (since those are all still coming off the "dry" uncompressed tracks) I usually use much faster attack times on the drum buss...and, depending on the tempo of the piece, often shorter release times as well. And *always* higher ratios than I would ordinarily use in an in-line situation! The point is to keep all the artifacts of a hellaciously squashed track, and then do all your balancing with the faders.

FWIW, I used to refer to parallel compression on bussed drum tracks as "The Frank Zappa Drum Trick" long before anyone started kicking around the term "New York Compression". Late-70's Zappa albums like Shiek Yerboutti & Joe's Garage were chock full of it.
Old 13th September 2006
  #19
Lives for gear
 
azwun25's Avatar
 

i do this trick with the PSP Vintage Warmer. It has a mix knob so you can blend the dry/nuked signal.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump