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Frequency Headphone Amps
Old 9th September 2011
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Frequency

Ive read a couple of books about mixing. However im getting a little confused about the frequency spectrum. Theres seems to be consensus about subbass is below 40 HZ. However the rest is a bit more unclear. Is there some kind of chart that is the common used thing? f.ex.

subbass < 40
Bass 40-200
Low mid 200-800
mid 800 - 5000
etc.

Kind regards
Mikkel
Old 9th September 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
 
erikdrink's Avatar
If you use the search function you'll get LOADS of info!
Old 9th September 2011
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by erikdrink View Post
If you use the search function you'll get LOADS of info!
Correct. However in the loads of info, I havent found any consensus. Thats why im asking. Maybe the answer is, that there isnt any?
Old 9th September 2011
  #4
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Matti's Avatar
It doesn't matter how you call them, in practise

Matti
Old 9th September 2011
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

I agree. I'm not sure why are are trying to assign names to frequency ranges. Is this for something you're writing or just personally curious?
Old 9th September 2011
  #6
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toth View Post
I agree. I'm not sure why are are trying to assign names to frequency ranges. Is this for something you're writing or just personally curious?
Thx guys. No im just a newbie and learnig new concepts, so i was just curious
Old 9th September 2011
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Lack of a consensus may in fact be the best indication of your answer...
Old 10th September 2011
  #8
Here for the gear
 

My guess is that there's no consensus on frequency ranges for subbass, bass, mids, etc. because they are artificial distinctions. If there's any consensus for subbass being "below 40," it's because we "hear" low frequencies as pitch until around a certain frequency, after which we "feel" the bass more than "hear" it. Some would say it's actually 20 Hz, but I don't think there's a truly universal cutoff with the way we hear down there.

There are some other psychoacoustically interesting areas above, but nothing (that I know of) that is as distinct, which again is why I don't think there's any real consensus on frequency points separating bass, mid and high ranges.
Old 10th September 2011
  #9
Lives for gear
 
thismercifulfate's Avatar
You don't have to set numbers, just as long as you have the general idea. Check out this graph if you haven't already: Interactive Frequency Chart - Independent Recording Network
Old 10th September 2011
  #10
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thismercifulfate View Post
You don't have to set numbers, just as long as you have the general idea. Check out this graph if you haven't already: Interactive Frequency Chart - Independent Recording Network
I have it on my Mac as a screensaver great chart!
It give good meaning, that its an independent thing. F.ex in my perception subbass is around 30. Thx for the answers!
Old 11th September 2011
  #11
Gear Maniac
 

I have similar chart posted next to my monitor console (I'm a live monitor engineer for a theatre). I also use an RTA so I don't miss by one or two while EQing on the fly. The keyboard is great but every instrument also has harmonics (basicly what defines the tone of the instrument) so a lot of it's just experiance & ear training.
Old 11th September 2011
  #12
Registered User
 

If you go to a forum like speakerplans, you will hear these terms banded about quite a lot. This is because each frequency range is usually covered by a different enclosure or at least drive unit.

Another term used is the kick frequency range, usually 80Hz to 150Hz because this range gives impact to the kick drum. Subs are usually below 80Hz.
It is not an exact science and I tend to think more in terms of bass, low-mid, hi-mid and top end.

For recording and mixing I think it is more useful to understand the frequency ranges of the individual instruments because you are more likely to be eq’ing individual instruments rather than a specific frequency range for the whole mix.
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