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Chance to buy a cheap CAD M9...should I go for it?
Old 9th September 2011
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Chance to buy a cheap CAD M9...should I go for it?

I've managed to find someone selling a "few weeks old" CAD M9 microphone for around 1/4 - 1/3 of the price they go for new in Australia and I'm wondering if its worth it?

I currently own a Studio Projects B1 condenser mic as well as an el-cheapo Behringer XM8500 dynamic mic. I use the mics mainly to record guitar amps, acoustic guitar and occasionally vocals.

I run the mics into an Apogee Duet, into a Macbook Pro and record in Garageband.

My recording knowledge is pretty limited but I've started trying to experiment with mics, particularly with recording my guitar amp. I've only recently discovered the benefit of using two mics to record the amp (told you my knowledge is limited!).

I'm basically wondering if the CAD M9 would be a significant improvement over the B1 as a condenser of if I could even replace the XM8500 and record with two condensers (not sure if this is a no-no).

So...are the M9's any good for vocals, acoustic guitar, guitar amp or ambient micing?
Old 10th September 2011
  #2
Gear Nut
 

Anyone? Is the M9 a significant improvement over the B1?
Old 10th September 2011
  #3
Lives for gear
 
BudgetMC's Avatar
I seem to recall somebody reputable saying that the M9 was based on the circuit of the VSM1. I've got a VSM1, and it's a serious bit of mic. I've also heard lots of folks talk about how good the M9 is, so I would say that it sounds like a good deal to me. Do a search for the M9 here, and I'm sure you'll come up with some good info.
Old 10th September 2011
  #4
Lives for gear
m9 is AMAZING on some vocalists. not on all though. it has something of a pre-processed sound, pre-mixed sound sort of, so it often sits in the mix better than some other mics. it doens't make it better since mixing is making something sit in the mix, but it sure does make it more appropriate and easier for the right singer.

it is tube but uses more transformer saturation to generate it's pleasant harmonics which imho is a much sexier sound than overdriving the tube like you get in some other cheap tube mics.

I adore my m9. but it's not good on some voices or some instruments, just like most non-neutral mics.

I think it's worth it. wish it was sexier looking though LoL.
Old 10th September 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Jimsi's Avatar
 

Think this was the CAD mic with the 12ax7 tube, i was wanting one myself as my first tube mic. If it's around 1/3 of the street cost, I'd buy it quickly, you can also replace the tube with a vintage RCA or Telefunken or GE for that matter for a little different sound....
Old 12th September 2011
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelley View Post
m9 is AMAZING on some vocalists. not on all though. it has something of a pre-processed sound, pre-mixed sound sort of, so it often sits in the mix better than some other mics. it doens't make it better since mixing is making something sit in the mix, but it sure does make it more appropriate and easier for the right singer.

it is tube but uses more transformer saturation to generate it's pleasant harmonics which imho is a much sexier sound than overdriving the tube like you get in some other cheap tube mics.

I adore my m9. but it's not good on some voices or some instruments, just like most non-neutral mics.

I think it's worth it. wish it was sexier looking though LoL.
Unfortunately, that is incorrect. The M9 is a transformer-less design. It uses an Opamp on the output stage, just like the Equitek mics.

CAD Audio M9 | RecordingHacks.com

That however, doesn't change how good it sounds, but it isn't because of the iron they use.

Also, saturating iron on a mic is usually not good. That's why a lot of the old more linear tube mics (versus the new lot of tube mics that try really hard to introduce harmonics) used large transformers (though not the determaning factor in which transformer to use; the main determining factor of which transformer to use is whether the ratio is the correct one for the ohm load of a tube; howbeit, the larger the metal the chunk of finely wound metal, the less likely to saturate; nonetheless, there are exceptions, the Ela 251 has a "smaller" sized transformer versus say a U 47... also, I'd like to say I am no expert so any experts please feel free to correct me).

This mic is pretty linear on the output as it uses an opamp, though the 12AX7 tube does add the "colour" (none linearity) that can be musical

I like CAD stuff, get the mic
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