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Sm7B and room noize Condenser Microphones
Old 24th December 2010
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Question Sm7B and room noize

Hey guys!

Quick question (this is for anyone who OWNS a Shure SM7B and knows how it behaves in the studio).

I'm a singer/songwriter, I play piano and sing. Something that I've noticed while recording is that I tend to sing better when I'm playing piano at the same time (weird, huh?). I've done many recordings, and it ALWAYS sounds better when the two are combined.

The problem I'm having with my current mic (Shure KSM-27 going through a GAP-73 preamp) is that it picks up the noises that my keyboard makes (Yamaha KX-8) when I hit the keys. It's VERY annoying, and sometimes can be heard quite distinctly in the mix (even when other instruments are in the mix).

I've tried recording piano and vocals separate, but it never has the same "sparkle" as when I'm with my instrument.

Questions--I've heard GREAT things about the Shure SM7B. If I swap out my KSM-27 for a SM7B, will the noise my keyboard makes not be a problem anymore? Will the microphone pick up sounds like that if they're coming from directly below it? Would this solve this problem and allow me to sing/play piano at the same time?

Thanks!

~Big Izzy
Old 24th December 2010
  #2
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Joe Gilder's Avatar
 

Hey Big Izzy,

The SM7B will certainly be less sensitive, since it's a dynamic, but since the keyboard is so physically close to the mic, it'll be difficult to know if it will completely eliminate any key noise.

Here are a couple things to think about.

See if you can get your hands on a plain ol' SM58 and just try it out in the studio. While it doesn't sound exactly the same as the SM7, you'll be able to get a good idea of how well it performs with the keyboard noise. Both mics are cardioid patterns, so it would be valuable to audition before committing to getting an SM7. (And you may find that the 58 sounds great.)

Try a super-cardioid dynamic mic. I use the AKG D5 ($100) a lot, and since it's a super-cardioid mic, it has better rejection at 90 degrees off axis. Position the mic above the keyboard facing directly forward. It tends to reject everything "perpendicular" to the capsule fairly well...worth trying.
Old 24th December 2010
  #3
Gear Nut
 

Joe,

Thanks for the information! I don't have an SM58, but I do have a Sennheiser Evolution E835 that I use for live performances--would this work to test this out? I'm not sure if it's a SUPER-cardioid (or if it's a regular cadioid), here's some information on it.

Buy Sennheiser E835 Performance Vocal Mic | Dynamic Microphones | Musician's Friend

Would this mic give me a good idea of how much keyboard I'd pick up with an SM7B?

~Izzy
Old 24th December 2010
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Actually, the housing of an SM7 is supposed to contribute to it's room rejection capabilities. So an SM58 wouldn't be a great test, other than to get the general vibe of the mic. A 57 is closer, from what I've heard, too. I love my SM7 and it's the only mic that gets any use. I hardly ever touch my AT3035 or AT2020.

The SM7 should pick up much less off your playing than the KSM-27 you're using now. But it will still get some of it. Maybe you can look into getting a quieter keyboard to play when tracking vocals. You might also consider playing air piano while singing. Sometimes it's not the physical action that matters as much as it's the focus you're putting on the instrument sound. If you can imagine what the notes should sound like, it might help you not focus on your singing as much.
Old 24th December 2010
  #5
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFRfan View Post
Actually, the housing of an SM7 is supposed to contribute to it's room rejection capabilities.
The SM7b is probably my best mic in terms of off-axis rejection. The off-axis response is probably one of the best reasons to choose it if you are dealing with a poor recording environment, or want to otherwise limit extraneous sounds.
Old 24th December 2010
  #6
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Joe Gilder's Avatar
 

Combining a dynamic mic with a gate/expander plugin on the vocal track might be the perfect combo. I did this on one song I recorded where I was having the same problem. The main sections where the keyboard "clicking" was really noticeable was when I wasn't singing. So I just had the gate kick in during those sections.

Depends on the song, and how loudly you play, but it's worth a shot.
Old 24th December 2010
  #7
Lives for gear
I own an sm7b, while i don't think it will cut out ALL of the sound of the piano...however out of all the mic's i use, if i were recording like that, the piano will be the least audible on the sm7b. The housing is good in that it cuts out all the reflections in the room from personal experience, compared to your KSM, the difference will be HUGE...partly because the sm7b is dynamic and partly because of the way the housing is designed...

I would always recommend the sm7b for live tracking...i don't think i use a condenser one vocals for live tracking anymore...usually just the sm7b...if there's another vocalist, i might crack out the sm58s...
Old 24th December 2010
  #8
Gear Addict
 

I have an SM7B and I also play piano. I know exactly what you mean about the performance being worlds away better when you are actually playing at the same time.

As others said the SM7B has good rejection characteristics.
The SM7 can also benefit as you can pretty much 'eat' the mic. One thing to be aware of is that an SM7 needs a HUGE amount of gain from the pre-amp. Many pres just can't cut it.

You could also consider building some isolation around the mic.

These links may give you some ideas, but of course I'm not recommending any of these products specifically as they cost as much as or more than the SM7 and aren't quite what you need. By using these as ideas and searching for more, you will probably get an idea of how to build some isolation (smaller of course).

RealTraps - Portable Vocal Booth
Welcome to sE Electronics

Here is a guy who did it with just aurelex:

Homemade Reflection Filter (With Audio Examples) | Home Studio Corner#

Of course you would want some additional isolation for the bottom.
Old 24th December 2010
  #9
Gear Nut
 

Awesome, thanks for the input everyone!

PfrFAN, that's a really interesting idea (playing 'air-piano'), I might need to give that a whirl with the KSM and see what happens!

Chuckduffy, do you think my GAP-73 would have enough gain to push a SM7B?

Kafka, you said that the SM7B is great if the recording environment (room) isn't the greatest. Is this a bad thing? I know that a lot of the "punch" when recording vocals and instruments comes from the room, not necessarily the mic--would the SM7B not be great for vocals if a nice, accoustically-treated room is available for recording? Would I lose that "punch" in my recordings if using an SM7B instead of a traditional condenser?

Also, do any of you guys know what the sonic characteristics of an SM7B are compared to a KSM-27? I really like my KSM, firstly because I got it for dirt-cheap (tip: If the regional Shure rep is ever randomly standing next to you as you're looking at the mics at GuitarCenter, use this to your advantage--he'll get the salesman to give you base-cost!) I also love the frequency response--it's very crystal-clear (lots of attention to detail), and it has a relatively flat EQ (besides the slight boost in the highs). What will the sound be like on an SM7B? I've never used one before, I've only heard great things about it. Will there be as much detail in the SM7B? What is the frequency-response like on the SM7B?

Thanks, guys!
Old 24th December 2010
  #10
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uncle duncan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigIzzy View Post
...Also, do any of you guys know what the sonic characteristics of an SM7B are compared to a KSM-27? .... What is the frequency-response like on the SM7B?

Thanks, guys!
There's a very well-kept secret in the recording world. It's called a frequency response graph. Apparently, I'm the only person here at GS who is aware of their existence, even though I mention them almost every time I post about microphones. Very strange. Anyway, if you were to find the frequency response graphs for those two mics on the Shure website, (or at RecordingHacks.com) you would see that they're virtually identical. The only difference is a little less 8k and above with the sm7b.

Before you trade in your mic, try changing the angle to see if you get better rejection. You'd need sealed headphones for that, or trial and error recording passes and listening back. You will lose a little detail with the sm7b, and a little "air", but that doesn't seem to bother the people who like the mic on vocals. Personally, I only use mine on guitar amps, but I seem to be in the minority.

In a Billy Joel interview years ago, he said he can't overdub vocals unless he's sitting at the piano. This might be an approach to try - play and sing live, then overdub a new vocal to the piano track with your hands on the keys, making the chord changes, but doing it gently and sustaining the chords, rather than pounding on the keyboard.
Old 25th December 2010
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Another good dynamic vocal mic is the Electro Voice RE-20. As with the SM7, it takes quite a bit of pre-amp to make the best use of it, but Musicians Friend currently has an ART Channel Strip on sale (Tube pre, opto/tube compressor, and 4 band parametric EQ) for 199 dollars. It has enough gain for the RE-20, probably enough for the SM7 as well. I know it works with the RE-20 though! Either one should help with room noise rejection and still sound good as long as you have enough gain to get a strong signal to the inputs.
Old 25th December 2010
  #12
135862
Guest
BigIzzy,
Other people have said it but pay very close attention to where the nulls are in the polar response of either/any mic you try. For maximum rejection, getting better with rising frequency in your ksm27 or your sm7, you should have the rear of the mic pointed directly at the keyboard...and if you can get away with that and still get a good vocal sound, you'll be getting the best separation of sources. Also, the closer you can get to the mic the less gain you'll have to use and the less room/spurious noise should get in.

I've had two figure 8 mics arranged on a sitting guitar player who was singing and had unbelievable attenuation just by pointing the vocal mic null at the guitar and vice versa. Best of luck, let us know how it goes.
Old 25th December 2010
  #13
Lives for gear
 
Jimsi's Avatar
 

The SM7b works well with the GAP73's 80db of gain, no problems there...
Old 25th December 2010
  #14
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigIzzy View Post
Hey guys!

Quick question (this is for anyone who OWNS a Shure SM7B and knows how it behaves in the studio).

I'm a singer/songwriter, I play piano and sing. Something that I've noticed while recording is that I tend to sing better when I'm playing piano at the same time (weird, huh?). I've done many recordings, and it ALWAYS sounds better when the two are combined.

The problem I'm having with my current mic (Shure KSM-27 going through a GAP-73 preamp) is that it picks up the noises that my keyboard makes (Yamaha KX-8) when I hit the keys. It's VERY annoying, and sometimes can be heard quite distinctly in the mix (even when other instruments are in the mix).

I've tried recording piano and vocals separate, but it never has the same "sparkle" as when I'm with my instrument.

Questions--I've heard GREAT things about the Shure SM7B. If I swap out my KSM-27 for a SM7B, will the noise my keyboard makes not be a problem anymore? Will the microphone pick up sounds like that if they're coming from directly below it? Would this solve this problem and allow me to sing/play piano at the same time?

Thanks!

~Big Izzy
Yeah, the KSM27 is a *very* sensitive mic. I've put the thing 8 feet above a string quartet and could still hear the people breathing - but the quartet sounded fantastic when they played. The SM7 is a great mic too, needs a really quiet preamp with plenty of gain as it is a very low output mic.
Old 25th December 2010
  #15
Lives for gear
I've noticed with my sm7b as well, it won't have as much high end as a condenser, but yeh...most condensers in that price range offer way too much high end anyway...

When i use mine for vocals, i have the presence bump and i don't actually set the roll off, i leave it flat. After its in my DAW, i high pass at around 250hz, and boost around 10k (this is where the abbey roads RS127 Rack plugin in their "brilliance pack" is just spectacular...) i boost about 2db there, and its probably the best vocal sound i have at my disposal thus far...very smooth mic in the mids, and just sits well....
Old 26th December 2010
  #16
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Gilder View Post

The SM7B will certainly be less sensitive, since it's a dynamic,
The pick up of off axis sound depends on the polar pattern of the design not which electromechanical type the transducer are of.


/Peter
Old 27th December 2010
  #17
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigIzzy View Post
Kafka, you said that the SM7B is great if the recording environment (room) isn't the greatest. Is this a bad thing? I know that a lot of the "punch" when recording vocals and instruments comes from the room, not necessarily the mic--would the SM7B not be great for vocals if a nice, accoustically-treated room is available for recording? Would I lose that "punch" in my recordings if using an SM7B instead of a traditional condenser?
Well, I'm not sure about "punch". It depends entirely on the room you have and how you position both the mic and the source. Honestly, the best way to know how any mic is going to work out to get one and try it out. An SM7b is an easy bet, especially if you get one used. If you don't like it, you can always get rid of it for about what you paid for it.
Old 27th December 2010
  #18
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiop View Post
The pick up of off axis sound depends on the polar pattern of the design not which electromechanical type the transducer are of.


/Peter
I think you took Joe's comment a little out of context here...what he meant wasn't just based on polar pattern, but the fact that traditionally condensers are more sensitive than dynamic mic's....ironically enough, condensers actually pick up MORE dynamics than dynamic mic's that restrict the dynamics some what...sure the pickup of off axis sound depends on the polar pattern, but distance comes into play and makes a big difference when you compare a dynamic and condenser. He simply meant that a dynamic in the same position as a condenser with the same polar pattern is likely to pick up less indirect sound than the condenser.
Old 27th December 2010
  #19
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelson89 View Post
I think you took Joe's comment a little out of context here...what he meant wasn't just based on polar pattern,
Not at all, just saying that polar pattern explains how mic's work in his regard.

Quote:
but the fact that traditionally condensers are more sensitive than dynamic mic's....
Mostly because they have amplifiers inside.

Quote:
ironically enough, condensers actually pick up MORE dynamics than dynamic mic's
Reference?

Quote:
that restrict the dynamics some what...
Are you saying that the (proposed) more dynamic bahaviour of a condenser
restricts dynamics?

Quote:
sure the pickup of off axis sound depends on the polar pattern,
Yes!

Quote:
but distance comes into play and makes a big difference when you compare a dynamic and condenser.
Some claim that and I question it. What mechanism would explain that behaviour?

Quote:
He simply meant that a dynamic in the same position as a condenser with the same polar pattern is likely to pick up less indirect sound than the condenser.
Yes, I know that is what he said and I question it. :-)


/Peter
Old 27th December 2010
  #20
Gear Addict
 
Amun Ra's Avatar
 

One thing to consider is that the SM7B is extremely directional. If the singer can hold his mouth at one position while singing, this is no problem. If he sways a bit side to side the result might be quite a bit of not so nice colouration.
Old 27th December 2010
  #21
RTR
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RTR's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigIzzy View Post
Awesome, thanks for the input everyone!

PfrFAN, that's a really interesting idea (playing 'air-piano'), I might need to give that a whirl with the KSM and see what happens!

Chuckduffy, do you think my GAP-73 would have enough gain to push a SM7B?

Kafka, you said that the SM7B is great if the recording environment (room) isn't the greatest. Is this a bad thing? I know that a lot of the "punch" when recording vocals and instruments comes from the room, not necessarily the mic--would the SM7B not be great for vocals if a nice, accoustically-treated room is available for recording? Would I lose that "punch" in my recordings if using an SM7B instead of a traditional condenser?

Also, do any of you guys know what the sonic characteristics of an SM7B are compared to a KSM-27? I really like my KSM, firstly because I got it for dirt-cheap (tip: If the regional Shure rep is ever randomly standing next to you as you're looking at the mics at GuitarCenter, use this to your advantage--he'll get the salesman to give you base-cost!) I also love the frequency response--it's very crystal-clear (lots of attention to detail), and it has a relatively flat EQ (besides the slight boost in the highs). What will the sound be like on an SM7B? I've never used one before, I've only heard great things about it. Will there be as much detail in the SM7B? What is the frequency-response like on the SM7B?

Thanks, guys!
The sm7b sounds great through the GAP, I bought the GAP for just that reason..to power my sm7b..and it does it with plenty of gain to spare!!!
Old 27th December 2010
  #22
Lives for gear
 

Dynamic mics are not "more dynamic" relative to any other mic. The the transducer in a dynamic mic is made up a wire coil and a magnet. One of those two elements is attached to the diaphragm so that it moves and generates an electrical current. This adds mass to the diaphragm, and contributes to reduced sensitivity to weak or distant sounds. Especially higher frequencies which typically only push the voice coil a short distance anyway. Inertia comes into play far earlier with a dynamic mic. The tendency for the relatively heavy magnet or coil to want to stay put or keep moving in the direction it is going rather than turn around and come back the other way. Condensers and ribbons have nothing attached to the element, making them lighter and easier to move back and forth with weak and/or high frequency sounds.
Microphone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Old 27th December 2010
  #23
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiop View Post
Not at all, just saying that polar pattern explains how mic's work in his regard.



Mostly because they have amplifiers inside.



Reference?



Are you saying that the (proposed) more dynamic bahaviour of a condenser
restricts dynamics?



Yes!



Some claim that and I question it. What mechanism would explain that behaviour?



Yes, I know that is what he said and I question it. :-)


/Peter
Traditionally condenser mic's due to their circuitry are more "accurate" in their response to transients than a dynamic microphone.

In response to the restricting dynamics, a dynamic mic restricts somewhat but a condenser doesn't, this is mostly to do with the design of it. The membrane of a condenser is traditionally MUCH lighter than a dynamic (full turn voice coil, not ribbons which are still dynamics by nature). The fact that it's much lighter, its much more sensitive to subtle changes...i.e. transients and dynamics, however a dynamic, which is essentially a coil and a magnet is traditionally quite a bit heavier in reference to the condenser, and thus less sensitive. Because the dynamic's response is based directly on the movement of air, one must then turn their thoughts towards intensity and the inverse square theorem, where similarly to light, the air dissipates in a way where if say the intensity is X at one point, it will then be X/4 intensity if the distance was doubled.

At this stage you'd think "well a condenser relies on this too"...but thats where the weight of the membrane comes in, the movement of the coil itself takes away some of the force due to its weight. Since the membrane of the condenser is lighter, not as much force is lost in getting the coil to move. However in a dynamic, there's comparatively a lot more force needed to move the coil, so first of all in its transient response, its not as fast because its heavier, due to this, its dynamic response is thus affected. As you move further away, the condenser because of its light membrane will still be able to pick up certain things, because there will still be enough force to move the coil, however in a dynamic, it reaches a stage much sooner where the force coming in isn't greater than the coils static force, therefore won't be able to move it...i.e. no sound.

Thats coming from a purely physics standpoint.

From an audio standpoint, i've tried it, and whether or not the explanation holds, this is more or less the exhibited behaviour.

Oh and just to make a small correction, condensers DO NOT have amplifiers inside...they instead have a back plate and a flexible membrane separated by air with a voltage (phantom power) applied across them...no amplifier...they work on change in capacitance as opposed to purely induction from a magnet
Old 27th December 2010
  #24
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kurt's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigIzzy View Post
Questions--I've heard GREAT things about the Shure SM7B.
~Big Izzy
Me to, however, a figure of 8 condenser or ribbon in such situations can´t be beat.
Old 27th December 2010
  #25
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enroper's Avatar
 

Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amun Ra View Post
One thing to consider is that the SM7B is extremely directional. If the singer can hold his mouth at one position while singing, this is no problem. If he sways a bit side to side the result might be quite a bit of not so nice colouration.


That's for sho'. I learned this the hard way via a ruined vocal take that was otherwise great. I pulled away from the mic for a louder passage and instead got yuckyness and also what sounds like more of the room sound.

So yea, sm7b is good for a bad room, so long as you dont let the room into the mic accidentally.
Old 27th December 2010
  #26
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Lenzo's Avatar
I have a SM7B and use it while playing acoustic guitar. Tilted up away from the guitar and singing over it a bit, it rejects the guitar real well. I had a gap in here for awhile, and as others have said, plenty of gain.
L.
Old 27th December 2010
  #27
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nelson89 View Post
Traditionally condenser mic's due to their circuitry are more "accurate" in their response to transients than a dynamic microphone.
Not really. A mic superior in its transient response is the one with widest, flatest frequency response which has little or nothing to do with the condenser circuitry.


Quote:
The fact that it's much lighter, its much more sensitive to subtle changes...i.e. transients and dynamics,
Nothing like that. What you are saying is basically that mass is nonlinear which it is not. Also dynamics is about maintaining a correct output in relation to the input as it changes. Weight is not a factor for linearity, dynamics and transient-linearity.

Quote:
however a dynamic, which is essentially a coil and a magnet is traditionally quite a bit heavier in reference to the condenser, and thus less sensitive.
Yes, dynamic mic's are typically less sensitive than condensers.

And yes, weight is a factor for sensitivity.

Quote:
Because the dynamic's response is based directly on the movement of air, one must then turn their thoughts towards intensity and the inverse square theorem, where similarly to light, the air dissipates in a way where if say the intensity is X at one point, it will then be X/4 intensity if the distance was doubled.
I assume you mean the inverse square law which is not really relevant to the discussion and also only applicable to a point source or something very close to it (wavelength long in relation to radiating object).

Quote:
At this stage you'd think "well a condenser relies on this too"...but thats where the weight of the membrane comes in, the movement of the coil itself takes away some of the force due to its weight.
Not really. The mass of the coil and the compliance of the suspension is the load which the air moves. That said mass is totally linear but the compliance is not.

Quote:
Since the membrane of the condenser is lighter, not as much force is lost in getting the coil to move.
While there are always losses these are small and can be seen in distortion measurements if they are big enough to affect dynamics and there's no coil in condensers.

Quote:
However in a dynamic, there's comparatively a lot more force needed to move the coil, so first of all in its transient response, its not as fast because its heavier, due to this, its dynamic response is thus affected.
Transient response and frequency response is two sides of the same coin in minimum-phase systems or devices.

Quote:
As you move further away, the condenser because of its light membrane will still be able to pick up certain things, because there will still be enough force to move the coil,
There's no coil in a condenser.

Quote:
however in a dynamic, it reaches a stage much sooner where the force coming in isn't greater than the coils static force, therefore won't be able to move it...i.e. no sound.
Static force? Do you mean "static resting resistance" or something along those lines?

Is this a theory or have you made measurements showing that there's such a mechanism of significance in the suspension of moving coil dynamic transducers?

Quote:
Thats coming from a purely physics standpoint.
I'm afraid not.

Quote:
From an audio standpoint, i've tried it, and whether or not the explanation holds, this is more or less the exhibited behaviour.
Perception in one thing, physics another.

Quote:
Oh and just to make a small correction, condensers DO NOT have amplifiers inside...they instead have a back plate and a flexible membrane separated by air with a voltage (phantom power) applied across them...no amplifier...they work on change in capacitance as opposed to purely induction from a magnet
All my condenser microphones have amplifiers in them. I doubt there are any without. At least there's a current amplifier (with close to 1x voltage gain) but often also a voltage gain.

If no amplifier, what circuitry do you mean with this?

Quote:
Traditionally condenser mic's due to their circuitry are more "accurate" in their response to transients than a dynamic microphone.

/Peter
Old 28th December 2010
  #28
Lives for gear
 

Acceleration = Force/Mass. It takes more energy to overcome inertia as the mass of a microphone diaphragm increases. Weaker sound = less change in velocity. (linear) ANY given sound level impacting a heavier mass = less change in velocity (also linear)

The Energy available to be transduced into an electronic signal =Mass x Velocity^2. This an exponential increase in available energy as velocity increases. A lighter mass moving at the same velocity as a heavier one will have less energy, but if the same energy is applied, a lighter mass it will accelerate to a higher velocity. and increase it's AVAILABLE energy exponentially.

Simply put, the heavier mass of a dynamic microphone's diaphragm means less available electrical output because the energy is lost overcoming inertia and mechanical resistance. As a result a weak sound impacting a lighter Condenser mic diaphragm will give a stronger electrical signal than the same sound energy impacting a heavier Dynamic mic diaphragm in a non-linear way.
Old 28th December 2010
  #29
Lives for gear
When i said coil in the condenser i meant flexible membrane (freudian slip but i later explained myself at the end).

When i said circuitry i meant that because of this flexible membrane there's a voltage applied across it so it works in change in capacitance as opposed to induction.

When i said condenser's were "traditionally" more accurate, i was referring to the fact that they're "typically" faster, as a result being able to reproduce more subtle nuances. Of course there are exceptions to the rule, but we're talking in a typical case here.

But you know as i'm writing this i'm wondering if you truly believe that something like an sm7b wouldn't be more effective at rejecting off axis sound source than a condenser of the same polar pattern. After all thats all the OP was after. I say it does, and many other people say it does. We can have our theories on the topic, but the fact remains that if the OP gets one to try out and tests between that and a condenser, i think he'll find that in fact it DOES reject more off axis sound than a condenser of the same polar pattern, in this case cardiod.
Old 28th December 2010
  #30
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hereticskeptic's Avatar
If anyone knows, does the SM7B benefit a great deal from a treated room, or is treating a room when using an SM7B somewhat unnecessary? I'm still going to be treating my room, since I'll be mixing in there, but I was just kind of interested in this, since most everyone mentions the 7B as a mic that doesn't pick up a lot of noise not in close proximity. Will I be seeing a solid improvement in my recordings once my room is treated than when it was untreated? Of course, I'll be finding out soon enough myself, but thought I'd ask, in case any of you have knowledge on this subject.
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