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Mixing, which road would you take?
View Poll Results: The lessor of two evils...
Mix a song a day for 10 days
26 Votes - 86.67%
Mix the whole album once a day and pick later
1 Votes - 3.33%
There is no option #3. Ever. Well, maybe using the 10 days some other way. But you can't tweak at the end of the 10 days. DAW's suck. Just kidding. Commit!!!
3 Votes - 10.00%
Voters: 30. You may not vote on this poll

Old 28th April 2003
  #1
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Mixing, which road would you take?

Let's say you have 10 songs to be mixed and 10 days in the budget for mixing. What do you do? It's a tough call on some projects. Especially those where the client is never happy and they keep changing their mind.
Old 28th April 2003
  #2
Lives for gear
 
littledog's Avatar
 

I'd actually want 12 days:

Mix one song each day.

Before starting the next song, listen to previous day's song with fresh ears and tweak.

Day 11: Listen to song #10 and tweak. Then burn CD of all mixes and listen to it in a variety of environments.

Day 12: do final fixes of all songs, based on notes taken during day #11.

I can't even imagine mixing 10 songs in one day, unless they were really simple (and similar) mixes. Like a whole CD of Bach unaccompanied cello or something.
Old 28th April 2003
  #3
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
In your strict guidelines I picked a song a day. I would insist on a few mixes per song. Vocal up/down, solo(s) up/down, maybe bass up/down, etc.

I’d like a third option of mix two songs a day and mix the whole record twice.
Old 28th April 2003
  #4
Mix ALONE with a DAW for 7 days, hopping back & forth between songs to stay fresh and to keep a 'song collection' perspective.

Then call in the band for 3 afternoon / evenings of tweakage, MTV, dinner & fatties.

Hop along to the next song as the band OK each one - printing the mixes as you go.

(or favorite, printing the mixes when they are gone to save time, to move along quickly with each 'approval' and to have a final saftey listen in a less 'hecktic' environment) - This is what I normally do. 2 sheets of A4 do me fine for outboard recall...
Old 28th April 2003
  #5
Moderator emeritus
 

You didn't mention my usual method of working (due to budget constraints) - mix the whole record in a day and send it off...
Old 28th April 2003
  #6
Gear Nut
 

Yeah, option 2 is a complete none starter for me. It just wouldn't happen.

Option 3, whilst useful for DAW mixes has the possibility of homogenising the sound of the whole album the same.

I agree with Drumsond. Nail the track in one day with a couple of variations. Keep it fresh.

Actually, when mixing a whole album in one go, you kinda get in to a rhythm and it's possible to do 2 in one day & save some time to redo 1 or 2 (there's always a couple that need re-doing, never heard anyone mix a whole album & get it all right 1st time)
Old 29th April 2003
  #7
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Well, the poll is ****ed. Who added option #3? That's not an option. Say buh-bye! All six of you who voted for option #3 are outta luck cause I'm about to change the poll. And if I find out who did it, well...they'll get 20 lashes with a TT patch cable.
Old 29th April 2003
  #8
There is only one
 
alphajerk's Avatar
 

****! my vote for 3 changed after i voted and my vote shouldnt count for 3. i vote for 4 then. i mix the album as a whole, 10 days ill mix the 10 songs over them... **** that one a day bull**** or the whole album twice crap. i mix it once, and jump around from song to song depending on my mood/inspiration.
Old 29th April 2003
  #9
Gear Maniac
 
Cape's Avatar
 

How about mix the songs as you go, tweak at end of session, tell them that ain't it, mull over and realise that was it..shiiitee. Doh!
Old 29th April 2003
  #10
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
I decided to change #3 once again, but I can do that since someone added a #3 while I was away and it's my sandbox. The deal is that you can't do everything in a DAW and change it later, you need to commit to the album and the process as you go. If you vote for #3 I'd like to see an explanation of how you'd use the time.

My vote was for #2. Since the band doesn't know what the hell they want you have 10 different mixes to pick from later, odds are pretty good that they'd like at least one of them. Figure that's a song an hour which is pretty doable unless it's some huge 40+ track production, but I ain't talking about that. Keep it simple, a few gtrs, vocals, maybe horns or keys, bass & drums. At the very least it would be an interesting exercise to see how the mixes turn out. I'd take advantage of it by trying different things like panning all the vocals to one side and whatever. I figure I have 9 other mixes to fall back on so why not try something "whacky"? Plus, in theory the mixes should be getting better every day.
Old 29th April 2003
  #11
There is only one
 
alphajerk's Avatar
 

i got 10 days.... ill mix for 6, then tweak on critic for 4.
Old 29th April 2003
  #12
Riffer
 
lflier's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by Dave Martin
You didn't mention my usual method of working (due to budget constraints) - mix the whole record in a day and send it off...
LOL... no kidding! Well, I just got done mixing a record in TWO days - talk about luxury!
Old 29th April 2003
  #13
Moderator emeritus
 

Quote:
Originally posted by lflier
LOL... no kidding! Well, I just got done mixing a record in TWO days - talk about luxury!
Sure. The biggest hassle is a situation like I had last weekend - a a mix project from a regular client who in this instance had almost no budget but had an emergency due to a deadline. I mixed the project in a day and a half because I spent more time trying to deal with HIS technical issues and crappy performances than I did getting sounds...
Old 6th May 2003
  #14
Lives for gear
 
stealthbalance's Avatar
 

jules way is THE only way to do it. that's the way i mix , that is the only
way i refrain from taking a lamp to someones skull, thats the only way
that my clients are absolutely blown away with the results , and that is
absolutely the only way that any mixer save 3 or 4 guys in the world
will continue to make a living in this wonderful record biz.
the days of the jack lord-wallace mix style and budget is coming
to an end . too bad the hired gun mixers don't have a clue whats coming.
Old 6th May 2003
  #15
OK, thats 3 of us that go for the old option three then..

Extencive DAW mix prep

Then final tweak time with clients..

Works a treat.
Old 6th May 2003
  #16
Lives for gear
 
Roland's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Jules
OK, thats 3 of us that go for the old option three then..

Extencive DAW mix prep

Then final tweak time with clients..

Works a treat.



I'm totally with Jules on this one! Though I would probably only spend about 3 days on the mixing.

Kinda think the way I work these days that the mix should be pretty much there by the time I get to the mix sessions. Clients will always be anal about odd things and so a couple of days at the end is the best time to have them in.

I find now that many clients just leave me to get on with it and having the others in after I have got it happening saves a lot of time. Negates the want to be involved with how you are EQing a drum sound arguement.

Regards


Roland
Old 8th May 2003
  #17
urumita
 
7rojo7's Avatar
 

hey! I voted for option 3 because I really didn't understand WTF it meant.
let's take 2 classic examples of great music and compare the processes.
what's goin' on Marvin Gaye, sounds like it was written, recorded and mixed on the same day, and I can listen to it over and over and over.
the white album or revolver fab four couldn't have possibly been done like this and I can and do listen again and again.

every project has its own dynamic. why not mix the song while you record it, has anyone tried that? I used to be paid to do just that.
or, mix each song after the overdubs are done while the flame for the song is still on, while you're still singing it in your head and then adjust for the next song (?culture club, beatles?)
and there must be other options. why not?
I prefer to work how my artists feel comfortable working and not impose any restrictions based on my lazy ass personality.
some want to play and play, thus all tracking and no play, and some would like to concentrate on their sound and emotional space for the particular tune. I always keep my self flexible to change any plan I've made because it tends to help the artist remain in a creative mood.
these days you can do a mix right away and at the end of the project you can touch it up.
I've had rough mixes beat out the album mixes a few times.
one never knows, do one?
Old 8th May 2003
  #18
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
I'm sure we've all had roughs beat final mixes. And if it hasn't happened you haven't been working long enough. Option #3 was easy to understand, at least for me it was. There is no second chance for a remix, there is no tweaking on DAW. You have to come up with the mix and then print it and live with it forever and ever. Kind of like recording to 2-track which I think is becoming a lost art.
Old 8th May 2003
  #19
Lives for gear
 
stealthbalance's Avatar
 

7rojo7 said:
I prefer to work how my artists feel comfortable working and not impose any restrictions based on my lazy ass personality.

7rojo7 - are you crazy??
if you are not on you game as a mixer - an artist is going to
eat you up for breakfast. you have got to have a method in which
you like to mix - including throwing the
artist out. if your ruff mixes sometimes blow out your
real mix - i'd make sure to always a/b between any ruff
and the final mix you are working on to not look bad.
Old 16th May 2003
  #20
Gear Addict
 
Beezoboy's Avatar
 

I would all in maybe 5 days, and then I would take some time away and get a fresh perspective for a couple days. If I come back and and still like it, then I would probably just do some minor tweaks and be done.

Worst case is I have to do fresh mixes in 3 days instead of the original 5.

Day 11 would be to pick the best out of the 2 or just leave the country.

Beez
Old 9th October 2004
  #21
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
bump
Old 9th October 2004
  #22
Lives for gear
 
djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by littledog
I'd actually want 12 days:

Mix one song each day.

Before starting the next song, listen to previous day's song with fresh ears and tweak.

Day 11: Listen to song #10 and tweak. Then burn CD of all mixes and listen to it in a variety of environments.

Day 12: do final fixes of all songs, based on notes taken during day #11.

I can't even imagine mixing 10 songs in one day, unless they were really simple (and similar) mixes. Like a whole CD of Bach unaccompanied cello or something.


I'm with this guy........because I hate...............
Quote:

You didn't mention my usual method of working (due to budget constraints) - mix the whole record in a day and send it off...
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