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Basic Mic Questions
Old 16th October 2004
  #1
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Basic Mic Questions

(1)“Ribbon microphones tend to be noisier.” Discuss arguments for and against this
statement.

(2)Even with the help of a good equalizer a omni-directional microphone it is almost
impossible to achieve the same characteristics as a directional microphone. How come?

(3) In order to record well low-frequency instruments such as bass or trombone I need a
large microphone. Discuss the validity of this statement.

(4) Please discuss any important information that you can derive from a POLAR plot

(5) What is an electrically derived and acoustically derived polar pattern?
Old 17th October 2004
  #2
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PaRaNoId's Avatar
 

it sounds like you need a good, basic audio engineering education. There are plenty of good books on the subject of microphone characteristics etc. Just go to you local Barnes and Nobles and look for a "home recording"-type book. People here can help, but with questions like that; I'm guessing all of our input will make little ....to no sense. PM me if you are confused by this....
Old 17th October 2004
  #3
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DeadPoet's Avatar
Re: Basic Mic Questions

Search for Harvey Gersts' "Big Thread", originated at the HomerRecording.Com bbs, but there's copies of it on the internet which are reduced to only the 'real' info.

It has *a lot* of microphone-related info.


Herwig
Old 18th October 2004
  #4
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Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Re: Basic Mic Questions

Quote:
Originally posted by PimpboyLee
(1)“Ribbon microphones tend to be noisier.” Discuss arguments for and against this
statement.
This is the only one I'll touch because you probably won't find a practical answer in a book. The rest of your questions sound like they're from a first semester audio class. Do your own homework buddy.

Ribbon mics inherently have a lower output then moving coil dynamic mics and condensors due to their design. Because of that they generally require a whole lot more gain from a mic amp to get up the same working level as say an SM57 if it's in front of an acoustic guitar or vocal. That extra gain almost always leads to extra noise which comes from lots of stages. The mic amps hiss and noise, the noise floor of the room your recording in, whatever RF is being picked up by cabling etc.
Old 19th October 2004
  #5
Gear Addict
 

Re: Basic Mic Questions

Quote:
Originally posted by PimpboyLee
(5) What is an electrically derived and acoustically derived polar pattern?
This really looks like a homework assignment... i'll help out with number 5.

A diaphragm, by itself, is inherently bi-directional. It doesn't resond to sound coming at its edges, and it responds equally to sound coming from front or back.

You can change this one of two ways.

1. You can place the diaphragm at the opening of a sealed box (creating an omni capsule), and you can cut vents in it in various spots to make for cancellation (between sound coming at the front of the capsule and sound coming through the vents). Where you cut the vents determines the directional pattern. This is an acoustically derived pattern.
2. You can place two diaphragms right next to each other and then combine their signals, in various proportions, with polarity switching, to create directional patterns. Hence "electrically derived."

All this is explained very well here:
http://www.tonmeister.ca/main/textbo...ustics/07.html
(unfortunately the very helpful drawings and graphs seem to have disappeared).
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