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mic for soul screams and suitable interface
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

mic for soul screams and suitable interface

hi there community! got to say this website is a blast, each question I have I end up here

so I would like to get a mic for home recording, Im in an untreated 12 square m 3 m height (130 square feet on 9.8 height) room but I have ok half circle booth

I want a mic for 'regular' singing but also for that singing and screams like janis joplin childish gambino (the kind of singing he did on awaken my love), charles bradley 'screams'

charles bradley:https://youtu.be/6slbqEMiKsI?t=158
childlish gambino: https://youtu.be/_hZCsgcKa-g?t=207
jannis joplin: https://youtu.be/guKoNCQFAFk?t=59
they are doing different things but they are all on the spectrum of what I mean

my budget for mic is about 250$, and for interface is 200$, (with good mic preamp, 2x2 for my electric piano, I dont record vocals and piano simultaneously)



I thought to go about the rode NT1 cause I heard he is balanced and natural for his price. I aint sure what interface to go with, I relly on reviews about how the preamp is but I still need to understand if the mic and the preamp will work well

im new into those things and if you have better\other ideas for an ideal mic and interface, share them with me

Last edited by lovley; 2 weeks ago at 04:12 PM.. Reason: wording
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
If you buy a Rode, make sure that you are buying the newer black NT-1, NOT the silver(?) NT-1a.
I saw Janis a few times. She was on whatever Shure or EV mic they put in front of her. The mic wasn’t a fraction of 1% of her sound. Same voice as her recordings.
If your budget limit is $200, I would stay with a good dynamic for a screamer.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
If you buy a Rode, make sure that you are buying the newer black NT-1, NOT the silver(?) NT-1a.
I saw Janis a few times. She was on whatever Shure or EV mic they put in front of her. The mic wasn’t a fraction of 1% of her sound. Same voice as her recordings.
If your budget limit is $200, I would stay with a good dynamic for a screamer.

oh yeah I meant the black one,
what good dynamic can you recommend of? and will he be good at capturing normal vocals? (home studio level kind of)
and what you meant about janis? I didnt quite get you "The mic wasn’t a fraction of 1% of her sound"
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovley View Post
oh yeah I meant the black one,
what good dynamic can you recommend of? and will he be good at capturing normal vocals? (home studio level kind of)
and what you meant about janis? I didnt quite get you "The mic wasn’t a fraction of 1% of her sound"
There are a number of excellent dynamic mics under $200. For recording a vocal, I find the Shure mics OK, but not my favorites. The Sennheiser 800 and 900 series sound much sweeter to me. I haven’t tried a lot of the other dynamic mics as recording mics, so I can’t recommend what I haven’t tried. Above your price range, I do like the Aston Stealth.

Janis was unmistakable on any microphone. The mic did not matter much. That’s what I meant.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post

Janis was unmistakable on any microphone. The mic did not matter much. That’s what I meant.
Not sure what you are getting at at all here?

Everybody is "unmistakenly" themselves no matter what mic is used.

Frank Sinatra for instance sang on ribbons and U47's and Shure 545's and probably a **** ton of other mics if you consider live performances and guess what... he sounds like Sinatra on all of them, just as we all do.

Mics are just tools to make a voice into an electrical signal, they all do it slightly differently but the the key word here is slightly.

Just like a paint brush one might choose a different one for a different job but while I might have a preference for a particular mic you might choose a different one depending on how you like to work.

It's about how you work. If we both as engineers record the same singer and I use an SM57 while you use say a RodeNT 1 we both are going to do different things with our mics from placement to eq and compression ect.

Most of the things we do (if we are knowledgeable) are probably going to end up making these two recordings sound closer to each other then when they were initially tracked because mostly we all have fairly similar ideas about what is "correct".

I have the singer get right on the 57 because even though he's a screamer I have a ****ty room.

You on the other hand have a very well treated actual studio vocal booth so in you maybe choose to have the singer a good distance from the NT1 because thats how it sounds good to you in your situation.

I'm going to do a big bass cut right off to take care of the huge proximity boost that I'm dealing with while you don't have that at all. You are maybe dealing with some siblance because maybe it's actually an NT1a that you are using so you are going to eq for that or maybe even ise a deesser.

I might use compression with a slow attack to get a bit more transient on the front end while you might be doing the exact opposite because your NT1 actually has plenty and could use some smoothing.

Point is by the time we apply compression eq and reverb we both are probably bending our original tracks towards a rather similar goal which would make someone listening think that the mics pretty much sound the same while that's not true at all.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #6
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLast View Post
Everybody is "unmistakenly" themselves no matter what mic is used.
I like the detail in your post, and recording folks can learn a lot from it.
I’m not sure you would disagree with my statement as I meant it.
First, I did not use “unmistakenly”, which is not a word in common use. I said that “Janis was unmistakable” on any microphone.
That is not actually true of many singers. I couldn’t ever pick out Brittney Spears or John Bonjovi by their voice alone. Give a very good singer a hit song and fortunate promotion, and the song could be a hit. But I usually wouldn't know that singer by the voice alone, even if their “kinda normal” voice had been on other hits. Janis I could recognize from the voice, without any ID. Same for Bruce Springsteen, Mick Jagger, Satchmo.. there are some voices like that in every genre and era. The choice of a mic could be perfect for that voice or not, but the voice itself is unmistakable.
Do you disagree?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
Gear Addict
 

Well thank you Mr Bushman for the praise of my ocd detail.

As to a vocalist being recognizable I think that's as much a personal thing to the listener as the singer truly being unmistakable to everyone on the planet.

If someone listens to a particular genre of music they are going to be more discerning of the details of it and will hear more of a difference between vocalists (and even other instruments too) and if they are not familiar or even dislike certain music then that's all going to sound more similar to them.

Sure if you listen to classic rock Joplin's power and style is hard to miss and confuse with some other singer but if all I listen to is rap or pop then Grace Slick might sound pretty much the same, listen to Somebody to Love and imagine you have no background at all in 60's rock or these artists.

It's the same with any music, if one doesn't know jazz then it kind of all sounds similar to a degree. If you don't listen to clasical it kind of all sounds the same.

Even back in the 1960's do you think people who were older then but still listening to music from the 30's or 40's would have found Mick Jagger clearly discernable from other male rock singers? Hell some people said rock wasn't even music, I would imagine many couldn't manage to hear through the "noise" of it.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
Lives for gear
For screaming vocals,

At $200 and under, Get the SM57.
or this
https://advancedaudio.ca/collections...ic-microphones

Hiel PR40, PR35 Can be found used $300 range

Shure KSM8 is the new high tech wide sweet spot mic, $500

RE-20, SM7B both in the $400 range

Any kick drum mics are also worth a shot.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 

My 2 different $450 shopping lists for the OP (based on description) would be...

1) SM58 $100 or less
2) Audient EVO $130
3) Soyuz Launcher (for flavor!)

Or....
1) Oktava 319 around $250 new Thomann USA

Oktava 319's are VERY cool for this style. I know from horsing around with mine at home. If you're a Classic Rock singer, they're cheap as chips,
for the "personality" they have. Popular to mod if you want to adjust the tone.
Not planning to mod mine, fine "as is".

2) Audient EVO $130
Chris

P.S. Clip of 58>Launcher and "stock" 319 below...
Attached Files

Song 106SoyuzBitchIs BackSM58 1 (2).mp3 (317.9 KB, 43 views)

Song 60oldwaysdie319final (1).wav (1.57 MB, 56 views)

Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by elegentdrum View Post
Any kick drum mics are also worth a shot.
That’s worth remembering.
But of course I didn’t remember until your prompt.
Once when the world was young I did use an AKG kick mic (the one with with the odd shape and teal bumper stripe) on an immature female voice that sounded screechy on every other mic. Worked like a charm.
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