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which closed pair of headphones would you recommend under £100 for recording vocals?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
which closed pair of headphones would you recommend under £100 for recording vocals?



I'm looking for some headphones that i can use to whilst recording vocals, so provide good isolation and little sound leakage, and translate bass at least reasonably and when i have to (at night for example) mix on. I know mixing shouldn't be done with headphones ideally.

closed back I have a pair of Presonus Eris E5 monitors, so I wont be doing much in the headphones..

I've owned a pair of 770's (80ohms) , i wasnt a fan of their sound, I found them so harsh with a strange stereo image & nothing translated. i've heard the 250ohms are better - but still, theyre a bit uncomfortable when wearing/listening for long periods of time. So for now, i'll leave all beyerdynamic headphones out of the question .. maybe. The 880s seem good from what im reading but they're slightly out of budget.

So i've narrowed my choise down to the following (some semi open which i would be open to if isolation and leakage arent a problem, so feel free to name some)



AKG K371

AKG K 240 MK II

AKG K-271 MKII

HD 558

Sennheiser HD-280 Pro

audio technica ath-m50x

audio technica ath-M40

Shure Srh440

Should i go semi or fully closed back
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Of that list, I have the Audio-Technica ATH-M50X, and I love them.

I also have a pair of Shure SRH840s and a pair of Shure SRH940s, and comparing those two the 840s have a far more balanced and even sound where the 940s are more "bass-forward". Although the 940s are more comfortable for extended listening with their velour ear pads, the 840s are lighter.

But neither of my Shures sound nearly as good as the ATH-M50X in a music mixing environment. Specs on the two make the Shure sound like a winner, but specs alone don't make good headphones. I think the ATH-M50X are more "transparent" in their sound, and they're much lighter than the Shures.

All this is my own opinion BTW...
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpl. Punishment View Post
Of that list, I have the Audio-Technica ATH-M50X, and I love them.

I also have a pair of Shure SRH840s and a pair of Shure SRH940s, and comparing those two the 840s have a far more balanced and even sound where the 940s are more "bass-forward". Although the 940s are more comfortable for extended listening with their velour ear pads, the 840s are lighter.

But neither of my Shures sound nearly as good as the ATH-M50X in a music mixing environment. Specs on the two make the Shure sound like a winner, but specs alone don't make good headphones. I think the ATH-M50X are more "transparent" in their sound, and they're much lighter than the Shures.

All this is my own opinion BTW...
I ordered a pair of AKG 361s but will be returning because of some quality control issues. I have the ATH-M40X coming tomorrow so i will compare and see which one's i will keep. If i choose the AKG ill exchange for another pair. If all fails ill try the Yamaha HPH-MT5. Im going to mix some music on each and see how well they translate. so far the AKGs are VERY VERY Good
Old 4 days ago
  #4
Beyerdynamic DT 240 pro are the best cheap closed headphones I've used. About $69 I prefer them to MDR 7506's. If you can get a good b-stock or used Monoprice M565c = I preferred them to Audeze Sine/Oppo PM-3's. You can sometimes find them for under $150 They are probably the best price to performance ratio of closed back headphones. (They also block out lots of sound as they are quite heavy-duty)

One thing to consider is sometimes for certain singers - it's better to use open-back headphones. Yes, there's going to be some bleed but they sing 2x better and more in tune. One thing to remember is just don't have a click track when doing it or at least have real drums or whats in the mix so the bleed matches what's in the actual song.

You can also use speakers and have them in opposite phase to sort of cancel each other out. Overall, if it's a better performance: it may be the best option compared to a singer being out of tune and just not feeling it with closed back headphones. Everyone is different though so it just depends on the singer.

My current headphones are Raal SR1A ribbon headphones which are as open-back as you get - and I'd prefer recording vocals with them. Stax L-300 would be my 2nd choice. (I'm not specifically suggesting anyone buy $3500 Raals for recording ... but simply that open back headphones are fine for recording vocals)

I also suggest looking up reviews at RTINGS and other headphone measurement sites.

Last edited by sm5; 4 days ago at 03:43 AM..
Old 4 days ago
  #5
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80 out of 8 View Post
Should i go semi or fully closed back
Closed, absolutely, which wipes out the 240s and perhaps a few others on your list. You don't want sound from the headphones bleeding into the track.

The ATs are good headphones but bass heavy, so if you want truly neutral I would not go there.

I don't have a precise recommendation tho as I'm shopping myself Honestly if you want them mostly for tracking and aren't going to do a lot of serious mixing with them, it shouldn't matter terribly much which you buy, the sound should be good in any quality headphones. And I am hearing some good things about very inexpensive ones like like Behringer 3000 and Senn 201. If you really want ATs, get the 20 or 30 model, no appreciable diff between that and the 40 or 50 models.
Old 3 days ago
  #6
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by bill5 View Post
Closed, absolutely, which wipes out the 240s and perhaps a few others on your list. You don't want sound from the headphones bleeding into the track.

The ATs are good headphones but bass heavy, so if you want truly neutral I would not go there.

I don't have a precise recommendation tho as I'm shopping myself Honestly if you want them mostly for tracking and aren't going to do a lot of serious mixing with them, it shouldn't matter terribly much which you buy, the sound should be good in any quality headphones. And I am hearing some good things about very inexpensive ones like like Behringer 3000 and Senn 201. If you really want ATs, get the 20 or 30 model, no appreciable diff between that and the 40 or 50 models.
The Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro is a closed back. + It received an absolutely fantastic review from Sonarworks:
https://www.sonarworks.com/blog/revi...e-review/#pros

To the OP:
+ If you intend to EQ/use it with Sonarworks, it seems to be a great choice as in the Sonarworks reviews after Sonarworks average correction it achieved higher score than headphone 6-8 times the price. The DT 240 got better scores after correction than the Shure 1540, the Neumann NDH20, the Beyerdynamic Custom Game, the DT770, the DT990, the Focal Listen Pro, the AKG K712, the Audio Technica ATH-M40X, the ATH-M60X...and it's 69Euro at the moment on the official Beyerdynamic website.

I don't know how great is the outside noise/sound isolation on the DT 240 Pro. The 2 most isolating (least leaky) headphones I've ever tried are the Sennheiser HD280 and the Neumann NDH20. If you'll often use your headphone for vocal recording where the singer listens to a click track/backing track than low sound leakage is very important.
Old 3 days ago
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozonepaul View Post
The Beyerdynamic DT 240 Pro is a closed back.
I was talking about the AKG 240.
Old 2 days ago
  #8
Here for the gear
 

For around the £80 mark I love the Sennheiser HD280 Pros. Outstanding isolation, virtually no audible bleed even when running compression and high gain for a quiet vocal alongside a high level in the cans.

I had a pair of MDR7506s and HATED them. Awful hyped top end which is shrill and immensely fatiguing in my experience. I spent a week recording with 7506s and couldn't wait to get them off. I ended up scrapping a week's worth of vocals because the nails-on-blackboard top end made me hold back as a singer in a weird way, which I didn't notice at the time.

The HD280s are very smooth and linear, a slight bass hump but nothing abrasive or unpleasant (unless you're listening to something abrasive and unpleasant, that is!!).
Old 2 days ago
  #9
Lives for gear
Tracking headphones and mixing headphones are two completely separate functions that need to be considered separately as they just don't mix.

A good tracking headphone needs as much attenuation as possible yet they don't really sound that good and aren't really any good for mixing. Good mixing headphones that you can accurately judge the mix with are usually open back and therefore not really quiet enough for tracking.
Old 17 hours ago
  #10
Here for the gear
 

for tracking vocals, i recommend closed drummer's headphones. i use the cad audio dh-100 phones.

i'm a vocalist and have found these offer a great value for the intended outcome of no bleed-through.

as one poster said, these are definitely not mixing phones.... just for tracking vocals. especially great for me as i often lay down whispery quiet takes necessitating high pre-amp boosts.

my .02!
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