The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
Multiple DAWs at once
Old 5 days ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

Multiple DAWs at once

Hey I was daydreaming the other day, and if for some reason both you and your friend have two-input interfaces but want to record a drum set, couldn't you simply run both interfaces at once, keep the machine running, and then have a four track machine when you later on re-align the recorded tracks?

Couldn't you do something similar say everyone at practice puts their phones into record mode, someone wraps theirs in a blanket and puts it in front of the kick drum. Then bam - instant separate kick track you can align later.

perhaps not practical but shouldnt this all work fine? Its not like the days of tape machines when you couldn't align later on. Just make sure you have a few good clicks and transients to align everything to quickly later on.
Old 5 days ago
  #2
Gear Guru
 

I have done things like this.


I was recording a classical concert for a client. In this space I usually hang my stereo LDC mics above and a bit in front of the stage, run them into a high end preamp, and then a DAW running on a laptop. I had my Zoom Q2 with me one day, and I put it on a tripod at the back of the room, thinking about it as a backup in case of a catastrophic computer crash.

When I got home I imported the zoom tracks and found they made excellent room mics. I needed to line them up - in my case, not too perfectly because there was a natural time delay involved. But once lined up, the timing of many digital devices is good enough for the tracks to stay lined up for a whole song.

It's an interesting exercise, but really, get an interface with more inputs! That's what I did once I found myself digging those "room mics". Aligning a bunch of independent phone mics does not sound like fun, the mics themselves actually suck, and you will have to re-align them periodically. Things are better than the days of tape, but you will get some drift.

I often mix multi-tracks of a video shoots, and they usually give me the camera mic to use as a reference to line things up. Once in a while, I may end up using that camera mic if it picks up something cool that I like.

If you are simply jonesing to record a drum kit and don't have enough inputs, the other thing you can do is get a hold of a small mixer, set up a bunch of mics and premix the drums down to the 2 channels.
Old 5 days ago
  #3
Gear Head
 

Cool. Yeah right? Even digital "jitter" between different DACs shouldnt introduce any worrying artifacts.

Oh no worries I have an over the top RME 16 track thing now. But Im just throwing this idea out there for any students or people in bands were two of the members might have both have like a duet or Focusrite interface. Or just me next time Im in a pinch haha.
Old 5 days ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 
esldude's Avatar
I've done this twice, and agree about aligning everything. Even a few PPM of clock drift will make a difference over a few minutes. I used Audacity which has a speed adjust feature. Takes a little finagling back and forth, but you can alter the speed of one track vs another to get them to align usually well enough. Still a pain in the rear vs having enough channels or two interfaces where you can lock clocks on them.
Old 4 days ago
  #5
Gear Head
 

Oh interesting, elsdude you did have phase or warble issues with all digital? I didn't know that could happen. the files can be different lengths?
Old 4 days ago
  #6
Lives for gear
At concerts, I routinely have to synch the audio/video from four Panasonic DMC-FZxxxx cameras, while I capture audio with two different audio devices. The audio devices are a Midas MR18 and a QSC TouchMix-16. Fortunately, all participating devices have stable enough 48k audio clocking that I don't run into problems with file length even over 2-hour timespans.

While initially worrying about the potential issues, I kept the following metrics in mind:
- At 48k sampling rate, that's around 2.9-million samples per minute
- At 48k sampling rate, 24 samples is a half-millisecond error
- At 24 video frames per second, a single frame is ~41-milliseconds, and about 2000 audio samples

Keeping these proportions in mind helps me to guide post-production strategy. For example, it's much better to slide the audio to match the video.

HTH
Old 4 days ago
  #7
Lives for gear
 

Some of us used to have to do similar things.

2 tape recorders, record onto one, then play it back and play along with it recording onto the 2nd, back and forth until you have a pile of hiss with a bit of music in the background.

Don't let limited tech prevent you from making music! Creativity is king.
Old 4 days ago
  #8
Lives for gear
 
esldude's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by lossleader View Post
Oh interesting, elsdude you did have phase or warble issues with all digital? I didn't know that could happen. the files can be different lengths?
Well in my case one ADC was 30 ppm faster than the other. So in these instances I was recording the whole time during a practice for a live concert. Was a bit over an hour.

So recording that long, even a small drift can add up to a significant fraction of a second. It amounted to about 100 samples per minute difference. Or 7500 samples for 75 minutes of recording. I was probably being somewhat anal about it. I had someone clack some sticks together a couple times before we started and at the end. Gave me an identifiable transient to line up.

Currently Audacity will let you adjust to the nearest 10 ppm. So you should be able to get within 5 ppm or less between two devices. That is enough it isn't a problem.
Old 3 days ago
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Sure you can, it’s been done, but is definitely the hard way of doing it. Surely most any full band can pull together $50-100 each among themselves to get an interface with enough inputs.
Old 2 days ago
  #10
Lives for gear
 
JayTee4303's Avatar
In your town, there are several places to find used computers. At least one, almost certainly buys blocks of used PCs from businesses, during upgrade cycles.

Capable, older boxes... tens or hundreds of them, going for about $100... with PCI slots.

E-bay... just search MOTU 2408, and/or MOTU 424...

Solutions start at $75.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump