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Choosing the right dynamic microphone
Old 8th December 2018
  #1
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Choosing the right dynamic microphone

Hey guys, I’m looking to purchase a dynamic microphone for recording my vocals. I make r&b music and my voice is a very high tenor (whether this matters or not lol). Currently using apogee duet 2 and an nt1a.

My room is untreated and unfortunately I can’t put any panels or bass traps. However, the room has carpet and a lot of furniture that dampens the sound.

I am mainly looking at dynamics until I can figure something out room-wise. I’m considering the sm7b but I’m also looking for alternatives because although I know the sm7b is a great mic, I’m uncertain it will be suitable for modern r&b. I’m sure you all know that modern r&b has pretty ‘hyped’ upper frequencies and if it sounds dark and muffled then I’m unsure EQ will help much. I’ve heard mixed opinions. Some saying it takes EQ well, some saying it doesn’t, it’s too dark etc.

The alternatives I’m looking at are the Sennheiser md421 and the Beyerdynamic m88. I might be asking for too much here but I’m looking for a dynamic that sounds close to an LDC, with that nice open and crisp sound. Is this even possible? LOL. Let me know what you all think.
Old 8th December 2018
  #2
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I personally prefer an EV RE20 to the sm7b
Old 8th December 2018
  #3
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The 900 series by Sennheiser, both the dynamic and condenser, are tight pattern mics designed for the stage. They are going to pick up very little room compared to the Rode you have. All have HF detail and extension beyond the SM7b or EV20.
Old 8th December 2018
  #4
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
The alternatives I’m looking at are the Sennheiser md421 and the Beyerdynamic m88. I might be asking for too much here but I’m looking for a dynamic that sounds close to an LDC, with that nice open and crisp sound.
Those are two excellent candidates for the sound you describe. Both are very "toppy" sounding mics, i.e. "crisp" as you say.
The M88 has a _much tighter pattern, if that matters to you. It might, in your space as described.
The 421 might sound slightly more "open" though, if that is your prime consideration.
Both great mics. Good luck.

PS Another great sounding dynamic with what could be called an "open and crisp" sound IME would be the Miktek PM9. Tight pattern similar to the M88. Less expensive too, if that is a consideration. Good luck.

Last edited by edva; 8th December 2018 at 03:47 PM.. Reason: +++
Old 8th December 2018
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
Those are two excellent candidates for the sound you describe. Both are very "toppy" sounding mics, i.e. "crisp" as you say.
The M88 has a _much tighter pattern, if that matters to you. It might, in your space as described.
The 421 might sound slightly more "open" though, if that is your prime consideration.
Both great mics. Good luck.

PS Another great sounding dynamic with what could be called an "open and crisp" sound IME would be the Miktek PM9. Tight pattern similar to the M88. Less expensive too, if that is a consideration. Good luck.
Thanks for your input! Currently leaning towards the M88 as it seems most suitable. How about the 900 series by Sennheiser as mentioned by Bushman. Specifically the Sennheiser e965. Doesn’t seem to be much discussion about it on the forum as much as the others mentioned. I didn’t know condensers for live performances were a thing!
Old 8th December 2018
  #6
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
Thanks for your input! Currently leaning towards the M88 as it seems most suitable. How about the 900 series by Sennheiser as mentioned by Bushman. Specifically the Sennheiser e965. Doesn’t seem to be much discussion about it on the forum as much as the others mentioned. I didn’t know condensers for live performances were a thing!
Most welcome.
Sennheiser makes good mics. Nothing wrong with the sound of the 965. It is a more "generic" or "vanilla" sound than the three dynamics in my first reply. Not as much "personality".
Not saying that's good or bad, just a thing.
As to condensers for live sound, a few points: 1. they can sound great 2. they are usually more fragile, and expensive. 3. they can be more difficult to work with in terms of feedback control, handling noise, excessive high and low frequency pickup not needed for vocals, and ambient stage-sound pickup. 4. if used over a long time, because they are condensers, the diaphragms will almost inevitably become contaminated by moisture, basically ruining the mic. 5. they are reliant upon stable, consistent phantom power, which is another link in the chain that can cause problems.
After almost half a century in music production and live sound, I am not a huge fan of condensers for stage vocals. Yes, they can sound good, but.....
Good luck.

PS I own or have used extensively all the mics so far discussed. Currently favoring the PM9 FWIW. Really like the sound and performance of this mic. Good luck.

Last edited by edva; 8th December 2018 at 04:12 PM.. Reason: +
Old 8th December 2018
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
Most welcome.
Sennheiser makes good mics. Nothing wrong with the sound of the 965. It is a more "generic" or "vanilla" sound than the three dynamics in my first reply. Not as much "personality".
Not saying that's good or bad, just a thing.
As to condensers for live sound, a few points: 1. they can sound great 2. they are usually more fragile, and expensive. 3. they can be more difficult to work with in terms of feedback control, handling noise, excessive high and low frequency pickup not needed for vocals, and ambient stage-sound pickup. 4. if used over a long time, because they are condensers, the diaphragms will almost inevitably become contaminated by moisture, basically ruining the mic. 5. they are reliant upon stable, consistent phantom power, which is another link in the chain that can cause problems.
After almost half a century in music production and live sound, I am not a huge fan of condensers for stage vocals. Yes, they can sound good, but.....
Good luck.

PS I own or have used extensively all the mics so far discussed. Currently favoring the PM9 FWIW. Really like the sound and performance of this mic. Good luck.
Some interesting points you made there. Do you favor the PM9 over condensors for tracking vocals? I’ve noticed people usually like to use dynamics as live stage performance mics and condenser for studios and tracking.

I have no other choice than to use a dynamic due to my circumstances. I’m just wondering whether a dynamic will do an adequate job for the purpose that I’ll be using it, which is for tracking vocals. But since you (and many others) mentioned the M88, I’m thinking i should just buy it and get recording.

Not really looking to go on a Wild goose chase trying to find the perfect microphone, but I’d rather have that peace of kind knowing I made a good purchase in the first place.

Listened to the pm9, I’m liking what I’m hearing. It also gets a lot of good comments for being very good value for money
Old 8th December 2018
  #8
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
Some interesting points you made there. Do you favor the PM9 over condensors for tracking vocals? I’ve noticed people usually like to use dynamics as live stage performance mics and condenser for studios and tracking.

I have no other choice than to use a dynamic due to my circumstances. I’m just wondering whether a dynamic will do an adequate job for the purpose that I’ll be using it, which is for tracking vocals. But since you (and many others) mentioned the M88, I’m thinking i should just buy it and get recording.

Not really looking to go on a Wild goose chase trying to find the perfect microphone, but I’d rather have that peace of kind knowing I made a good purchase in the first place.
In the studio, I use condensers on vocals probably more than 90% of the time. Usually LDC's in the 1 - 2K$ range. When I use a dynamic, it's almost always a 441, an Sm7b or an RE-20. All of the issues that make condensers tricky to work with on stage can be much more carefully controlled in a studio environment, or do not even come into play (i.e. feedback issues).
A condenser will generally give a much "broader" capture, which the Engineer can then mold into whatever type sound is needed with the luxury of time and solitude in the studio. Live sound is a different animal. (I will add that sometimes, if I am unfamiliar with the singer, or if I think in the end a different "flavor" will be needed, I simultaneously track vocals with a LDC _and a dynamic, side by side behind the same pop screen. Usually will use a 441 for this.)

Yes, pick a mic and get to recording! And you should have "peace of mind" with either the M88, the 421, or the PM9.
The first two are "classics", very old designs, time-tested, and usually easy to re-sell if that is your intention. The PM9 is a modern design, with lessons learned from the classics, and "enhanced". A "bigger", "bolder", and more "modern" sound.
Best of course would be to hear them first then decide. Easier said than done. Maybe an online comparison is available, but still wouldn't be your voice in your space. However, all three are professional, well-built, great sounding tools that you can have confidence using. Hard to go far wrong with any of these three.
Just an aside, my all time favorite dynamic is the Sennheiser 441. My "desert island" mic, literally could be used on any source, in any genre, and would do the job very well in all cases. Expensive, strange form factor, slightly more fragile than most, but purely in terms of sonics, the best to my ear. A very "musical" sounding mic. (Hope I haven't muddied the waters by throwing that in, haha, sorry. I just have a passion for good mics and enjoy conversing on the subject.) Good luck!

Last edited by edva; 8th December 2018 at 05:48 PM.. Reason: +- coffee, lots of coffee!
Old 8th December 2018
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
I have no other choice than to use a dynamic due to my circumstances.

Not really looking to go on a Wild goose chase trying to find the perfect microphone, but I’d rather have that peace of kind knowing I made a good purchase in the first place.
Regarding the first part, if your “circumstances” are the room sound, the condensers designed for live use will effectively kill most of that. Yes, the dynamics will generally be a little more effective, but any of them will make your Rode seem like an omni.

Regarding the second part, if you are leaning toward one of the dynamics mentioned in this thread, you can’t really go wrong. I know (on Gearslutz) the posters, who do not give bad advice or advance odd theories. I have used some of the recommended mics and know that they are good mics, and as for the other mics, I trust that none of them are a bad choice if these particular posters recommend them.
Old 8th December 2018
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
In the studio, I use condensers on vocals probably more than 90% of the time. Usually LDC's in the 1 - 2K$ range. When I use a dynamic, it's almost always a 441, an Sm7b or an RE-20. All of the issues that make condensers tricky to work with on stage can be much more carefully controlled in a studio environment, or do not even come into play (i.e. feedback issues).
A condenser will generally give a much "broader" capture, which the Engineer can then mold into whatever type sound is needed with the luxury of time and solitude in the studio. Live sound is a different animal. (I will add that sometimes, if I am unfamiliar with the singer, or if I think in the end a different "flavor" will be needed, I simultaneously track vocals with a LDC _and a dynamic, side by side behind the same pop screen. Usually will use a 441 for this.)

Yes, pick a mic and get to recording! And you should have "peace of mind" with either the M88, the 421, or the PM9.
The first two are "classics", very old designs, time-tested, and usually easy to re-sell if that is your intention. The PM9 is a modern design, with lessons learned from the classics, and "enhanced". A "bigger", "bolder", and more "modern" sound.
Best of course would be to hear them first then decide. Easier said than done. Maybe an online comparison is available, but still wouldn't be your voice in your space. However, all three are professional, well-built, great sounding tools that you can have confidence using. Hard to go far wrong with any of these three.
Just an aside, my all time favorite dynamic is the Sennheiser 441. My "desert island" mic, literally could be used on any source, in any genre, and would do the job very well in all cases. Expensive, strange form factor, slightly more fragile than most, but purely in terms of sonics, the best to my ear. A very "musical" sounding mic. (Hope I haven't muddied the waters by throwing that in, haha, sorry. I just have a passion for good mics and enjoy conversing on the subject.) Good luck!
Ah, the 441. Would love to have one of those, unfortunately it’s out of budget and I can’t seem to find any decent used ones on eBay. You said the PM9 has a more “modern” sound, which is pretty much the sound that I’m looking for since I want that clear, crisp sound on my recordings. I had a look and it’s not too expensive either, crazy how you can get quality for fairly cheap nowadays isn’t it?
Old 8th December 2018
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushman View Post
Regarding the first part, if your “circumstances” are the room sound, the condensers designed for live use will effectively kill most of that. Yes, the dynamics will generally be a little more effective, but any of them will make your Rode seem like an omni.

Regarding the second part, if you are leaning toward one of the dynamics mentioned in this thread, you can’t really go wrong. I know (on Gearslutz) the posters, who do not give bad advice or advance odd theories. I have used some of the recommended mics and know that they are good mics, and as for the other mics, I trust that none of them are a bad choice if these particular posters recommend them.
Yeah, I appreciate that experienced posters hone in and give their input. I am leaning towards the dynamics mentioned, mainly between the PM9 and m88, but I’m aware that there are a few other options available to me. I’m quite indecisive but I’m sure I’ll be happy with it once I have one of them.
Old 8th December 2018
  #12
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
You said the PM9 has a more “modern” sound, which is pretty much the sound that I’m looking for since I want that clear, crisp sound on my recordings. I had a look and it’s not too expensive either, crazy how you can get quality for fairly cheap nowadays isn’t it?
There you go. Yep, the M88, nice as it is, is much more "old school" compared to the PM9, which although very affordable is by no means a "cheap" mic. It is well constructed, very physically substantial ("beefy"), and sounds far more expensive than its usual selling price might indicate.. Really can't go wrong for such a modest investment. As you say, amazing what you can get these days for the money. It's a "buyers market" these days I believe.
As a bonus, the company is based in Nashville, and is responsive to customer communication (I needed a replacement shock mount once for a Miktek condenser, and was easily able to get someone on the phone, and they sent it out quickly, at no charge) . Beyer and Sennheiser are German based, and may or may not be so easy reach should you ever need to.
Anyway, good luck.
I'll add this: I own both, multiples of the PM9 in fact. I use the M88 on kik drum, or floor tom sometimes. Once in a while on the dreaded banjo haha. Or "hand percussion" instruments. That sort of thing. I use the PM9's on vocals only. So the M88 is more "versatile", the PM9 more "vocal specific", for me. HTH. Good luck.
PS if you use an M88 on kik drum, or vocal for that matter, best to use the Beyer-made pop filter to protect the capsule, as per Beyer recommendation.

Last edited by edva; 8th December 2018 at 07:28 PM.. Reason: -++PS
Old 8th December 2018
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
There you go. Yep, the M88, nice as it is, is much more "old school" compared to the PM9, which although very affordable is by no means a "cheap" mic. It is well constructed, very physically substantial ("beefy"), and sounds far more expensive than its usual selling price might indicate.. Really can't go wrong for such a modest investment. As you say, amazing what you can get these days for the money. It's a "buyers market" these days I believe.
As a bonus, the company is based in Nashville, and is responsive to customer communication (I needed a replacement shock mount once for a Miktek condenser, and was easily able to get someone on the phone, and they sent it out quickly, at no charge) . Beyer and Sennheiser are German based, and may or may not be so easy reach should you ever need to.
Anyway, good luck.
I'll add this: I own both, multiples of the PM9 in fact. I use the M88 on kik drum, or floor tom sometimes. Once in a while on the dreaded banjo haha. Or "hand percussion" instruments. That sort of thing. I use the PM9's on vocals only. So the M88 is more "versatile", the PM9 more "vocal specific", for me. HTH. Good luck.
PS if you use an M88 on kik drum, or vocal for that matter, best to use the Beyer-made pop filter to protect the capsule, as per Beyer recommendation.
Hey, thanks again for your informative response. I’ll be mainly using the microphone for vocals, so the PM9 would probably be the better choice. I listened to a live performance using the PM9 on their website but couldn’t find one in a studio. Would love to hear what it sounds like in a quieter environment. Would this microphone require a pop filter also?
Old 8th December 2018
  #14
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
Hey, thanks again for your informative response. I’ll be mainly using the microphone for vocals, so the PM9 would probably be the better choice. I listened to a live performance using the PM9 on their website but couldn’t find one in a studio. Would love to hear what it sounds like in a quieter environment. Would this microphone require a pop filter also?
In a studio setting I would always use a good pop "screen" (on a separate stand, not attached to the mic), for any vocal mic. For live use, I have not had to put a pop filter on the PM9, but, I am high-passing pretty far up, _depending on the singer (anywhere from 60 to sometimes close to 200 (!) Hz.). In either case, always let your ear be the final judge.
The PM9 does have a very "healthy" proximity effect, e.g. you can really "warm it up" by singing close. A nice, deep, but tight and well controlled low end. And a lot of that "open, crisp" sound you had first mentioned. Gives the impression of clarity and fullness at the same time. It is a mic that rewards good technique and flatters good voices. I think you will be impressed. I am, and I have owned and used a _lot of mics. But definitely have a pop screen handy in case you need it, because the mic will "pop" if you blow a lot of breath into it. HTH. Good luck.

Last edited by edva; 8th December 2018 at 08:06 PM.. Reason: +
Old 8th December 2018
  #15
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EvilRoy's Avatar
Neodymium magnet.

My EV 257s kill my sm57 on vocals, almost condenser like performance. They suck on EG though (too bright and harsh) where the 57 shines.
Old 8th December 2018
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
In a studio setting I would always use a good pop "screen" (on a separate stand, not attached to the mic), for any vocal mic. For live use, I have not had to put a pop filter on the PM9, but, I am high-passing pretty far up, _depending on the singer (anywhere from 60 to sometimes close to 200 (!) Hz.). In either case, always let your ear be the final judge.
The PM9 does have a very "healthy" proximity effect, e.g. you can really "warm it up" by singing close. A nice, deep, but tight and well controlled low end. And a lot of that "open, crisp" sound you had first mentioned. Gives the impression of clarity and fullness at the same time. It is a mic that rewards good technique and flatters good voices. I think you will be impressed. I am, and I have owned and used a _lot of mics. But definitely have a pop screen handy in case you need it, because the mic will "pop" if you blow a lot of breath into it. HTH. Good luck.
Sounds good, I bit the bullet and bought a new one. I might give the m88 and the 421 a try as well, If I can pick them up used for a good price. From there I’ll decide which one I like best. But I have a good feeling about the pm9
Old 8th December 2018
  #17
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I had bought a PM9 a while back for live vocals and have used it for recording a couple times. To my ears it comes pretty close to sounding like a condenser mic. I really like Miktek gear and I also have a Miktek C1 LDC which I consider to be one of my better vocal mics.
Old 8th December 2018
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkF48 View Post
I had bought a PM9 a while back for live vocals and have used it for recording a couple times. To my ears it comes pretty close to sounding like a condenser mic. I really like Miktek gear and I also have a Miktek C1 LDC which I consider to be one of my better vocal mics.
Excellent! I need to sound as close as possible to a condenser I can get and this mic seems like a good fit for that sound. Looking forward to using it. A friend of mine has the SM58 which is also something I wanted to give a shot.
Old 8th December 2018
  #19
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
Excellent! I need to sound as close as possible to a condenser I can get and this mic seems like a good fit for that sound. Looking forward to using it. A friend of mine has the SM58 which is also something I wanted to give a shot.
That PM9 does have some condenser-like qualities to the sound. I think when you hear the playback it is going to put a big smile on your face. And the 58 is not in the same league, sound-wise, far less "detail" and "extension". Although I wish I had a penny for every 58 they ever sold! Enjoy your new mic!
Old 8th December 2018
  #20
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The 421 is my go to for rap/r&b - Ive got a bunch so they are like my 58

solid as f - open and punchy - vocalists love them

the 441 is my preferred option - but they are pricy - reserved for better talent
Old 9th December 2018
  #21
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There's usually a mint M88TG for sale on eBay, for around $300. My issue with the M88, was due to my very bright top end, there was a little too much sibilance (no longer an issue with it BTW).

During that period, however, I discovered a low cost replacement, for the M88. It's the AKG D790, which sounds like it, after you de-ess/roll off the top end. They run around $60 or less on ebay,
Guitar Center occasionally has them online.

EVERY time I used that microphone singing around town, any other singers would want to know "what mic" it was. (Neumann? Expensive AT? etc.)

The other dynamic microphone I love is the 441.

Any of these three minimize bad room tone well.

Been influenced by Bob Ohlsson's opinion on avoiding use of pop screens BTW, and never use them anymore!
Chris
Old 11th December 2018
  #22
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You might want to check out the Heil mics. The PR 40 is a good versatile mic. Works for vocals, drums even acoustic guitars and guitar cabs.
Old 11th December 2018
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
That PM9 does have some condenser-like qualities to the sound. I think when you hear the playback it is going to put a big smile on your face. And the 58 is not in the same league, sound-wise, far less "detail" and "extension". Although I wish I had a penny for every 58 they ever sold! Enjoy your new mic!
There’s a used Miktek PM9 on ebay fron Altomusicpro. $119.99 or best offer. Cheap enough to gamble on this one. I love mine on vocals.
Old 11th December 2018
  #24
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SM7, M88, RE20, 441... all classics for a reason. I have a feeling an M88 will be more instantly gratifying for you, given your description of what you're after, but you really couldn't go wrong with any of them. My only thing with M88's is that if the source has a strong upper midrange presence to begin with, it's usually not my first choice since it naturally accentuates that area to begin with and those two things combined can be a bit much. 441 and SM7 are on the darker side, but some additive EQ in the top end will get you where you want to go no problem.
Old 13th December 2018
  #25
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Update. The Miktek Pm9 I ordered ended up getting lost in the post. Since I’m in the UK very few retailers stock this mic and the one I bought it from said they won’t have any until next month.

I’m now back to square one, being as indecisive as one can get choosing the ‘right’ mic lol. I have the Beyerdynamic m88 as my first choice and Sennheiser 421 as second choice. I’m also considering the RE20, how would this compare to the m88 and 421?
Old 13th December 2018
  #26
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Get the M88TG. The MD421 (If it's vintage)
and the RE20 are classics too.

But... the M88 will reject bad room tone the best.
(like my D790)

Plus, like the other three I mentioned above,
the M88 takes EQing very well.
Chris
Old 13th December 2018
  #27
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmiller5 View Post
Update. The Miktek Pm9 I ordered ended up getting lost in the post. Since I’m in the UK very few retailers stock this mic and the one I bought it from said they won’t have any until next month.

I’m now back to square one, being as indecisive as one can get choosing the ‘right’ mic lol. I have the Beyerdynamic m88 as my first choice and Sennheiser 421 as second choice. I’m also considering the RE20, how would this compare to the m88 and 421?
How unfortunate. But the other three are also very good, so more of a side step than a back step. I own all four anyway ha ha.
Differences are the M88 has a much tighter pattern. The 421 possibly the widest pattern, but the RE-20 also wide but a more even off-axis sound. RE-20 less prone to proximity effect (bass boost at close distance), and a "flatter" or "more dry" sound than the 88 or the 421. The 421 a somewhat "livlier" sound than the RE-20 or he M88. The M88 is very nice, good bass and fairly "natural" sounding, I just think they went a little too far with the high end boost, but that's a matter of personal preference I guess. Can't stand it on snare for example, but then I don't like snares that are too bright sounding. I do like it on lower frequency sources, or on "dull" sounding sources, it "perks up" the sound nicely. (remember that Beyer strongly recommend a blast filter to protect the M88. I have seen too many ruined by people using them in kik drums without a filter. Vocals too for a loud singer). 421 is also a good all-'rounder, and eventually every studio should have them all. (be careful adjusting the position of a 421. I've seen too many that took a "nosedive" to the floor by people grabbing the mic and accidentally loosing the clip latch). Hope you get your hands on a PM9 one day too, that is truly an awesome sounding hand held dynamic vocal mic. Good luck!
Old 14th December 2018
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edva View Post
How unfortunate. But the other three are also very good, so more of a side step than a back step. I own all four anyway ha ha.
Differences are the M88 has a much tighter pattern. The 421 possibly the widest pattern, but the RE-20 also wide but a more even off-axis sound. RE-20 less prone to proximity effect (bass boost at close distance), and a "flatter" or "more dry" sound than the 88 or the 421. The 421 a somewhat "livlier" sound than the RE-20 or he M88. The M88 is very nice, good bass and fairly "natural" sounding, I just think they went a little too far with the high end boost, but that's a matter of personal preference I guess. Can't stand it on snare for example, but then I don't like snares that are too bright sounding. I do like it on lower frequency sources, or on "dull" sounding sources, it "perks up" the sound nicely. (remember that Beyer strongly recommend a blast filter to protect the M88. I have seen too many ruined by people using them in kik drums without a filter. Vocals too for a loud singer). 421 is also a good all-'rounder, and eventually every studio should have them all. (be careful adjusting the position of a 421. I've seen too many that took a "nosedive" to the floor by people grabbing the mic and accidentally loosing the clip latch). Hope you get your hands on a PM9 one day too, that is truly an awesome sounding hand held dynamic vocal mic. Good luck!
Considering what you (and a few others) have mentioned, I think the 421 might be actually what I'm looking for. As you say, its livelier and thats pretty much what I'll need since I'm making modern R&B. I would have honestly upgraded to a new condenser for this reason, but a dynamic will have to do for now due to the fact that I can't put up any acoustic treatment.

Im not sure whether the M88s improved 'room rejection' would be that much of a deciding factor to get it over the 421 now that I think of it. Im no expert but I feel like the 421 will be adequate enough to reduce room sounds, but hey, I might be wrong. As I mentioned before, I want a dynamic that is able to lower the room tone and interference, yet be detailed, open and sound 'closer' towards the condenser spectrum.
Old 14th December 2018
  #29
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The M88 is a "full frequency" microphone (as per Beyerdynamic). The 421 and RE20 have less upper frequency capture.

Also a potential use of a 421 is to record a trio of
singers, at the same time (I used to do that).
So the pattern is wider than the M88.

Also, on a budget pre, the M88 will sound the closest to a LDC, more than 421 or RE20.
(Jim Williams is a resident expert on pairing a RE20 to sound like a high quality LDC)
Chris
Old 14th December 2018
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessparov2.0 View Post
The M88 is a "full frequency" microphone (as per Beyerdynamic). The 421 and RE20 have less upper frequency capture.

Also a potential use of a 421 is to record a trio of
singers, at the same time (I used to do that).
So the pattern is wider than the M88.

Also, on a budget pre, the M88 will sound the closest to a LDC, more than 421 or RE20.
(Jim Williams is a resident expert on pairing a RE20 to sound like a high quality LDC)
Chris
Interesting. What are your thoughts on the Heil PR-40? Thought I’d throw that in there since it’s been mentioned.
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