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Which USB condenser microphone is the best for my voice? Condenser Microphones
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Thread Starter
Which USB condenser microphone is the best for my voice?

Hi. Here is the my some test acapella recording.

I find a good USB condenser microphone. Budget between 30-50$. I really like Audio Technica AT-2020 microphone audio quality and i need a cheap USB condenser microphone sounded like AT2020. I want bright and clear sound. So, which microphone do you prefer for me and my voice?

By the way my voice range is:

Chest voice: E2 - A4 and C5
Falsetto: F2 - G5

I born in 27 July, 1999. (So i'm 18 years old and my voice sounded like this.)

And umm i have some questions. My voice is Tenor or Baritone? What kind of Tenor or Baritone i am? Robust Tenor? High Tenor? or High Baritone?

Last edited by Erdem Alsirt; 1 week ago at 10:11 PM.. Reason: I put some more important informations.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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MarkF48's Avatar
A budget of $30-50 isn't going to get you a decent quality mic of any kind. If you like the sound of the AT2020 save up your money until you can get an Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ . Is one has a headphone jack so you can monitor your tracks while you perform.

While they aren't USB mics, I would suggest staying away from any mic the has a model name of BM700, BM800, or similar. They are cheaply made and many users report poor quality and failures.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkF48 View Post
A budget of $30-50 isn't going to get you a decent quality mic of any kind. If you like the sound of the AT2020 save up your money until you can get an Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ . Is one has a headphone jack so you can monitor your tracks while you perform.

While they aren't USB mics, I would suggest staying away from any mic the has a model name of BM700, BM800, or similar. They are cheaply made and many users report poor quality and failures.
Those are fine for the $15~ you pay, but nowhere near professional quality (I've heard better results from those than a lot of headsets and USB mics assuming you have phantom power and some sort of audio processing skill). If you want to make any money those are definitely not the way to go, but neither are most USB mics. I'd advise against actually buying one as well though because they're not capable of doing much besides YouTube videos and VOIP unless you're great at editing audio.

$50 could get you a Blue Snowball or Samson Go, but those are both pretty bad IMO. Honestly I find all of Blue's sub $300 stuff to be bad, especially the SL versions of the Spark and Bluebird.

Save up for an interface and get a decent used mic. You could probably find the Behringer UMC202HD for around $50-60, and some used mics can be found for $50 as well.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Its like buying shoes. Anything you buy at a budget shoe store is going to be cheap imported stuff that's going to lack comfort and finding what you want in the proper size purely pot luck.

Getting the best mic for your particular voice is a whole different ball game. It comes through experience using many different mics and finding the right one that fits. You can go for a crap shoot and buy something that has allot of flexibility and hopefully luck out. Voices are highly adaptable and many mic manufacturers target the greatest number of people. If you're someone like me, that kind of targeting was a big fail. I could only adapt so much to commonly used mics before I had to adapt the mic to me.

Its not something you can do on line either. You have to be in the room with the mic, preferably with someone who has a good mic stock who can try out different mics based on the results "they're" hearing, not you. What you hear is a boost in bass because allot of the sound from the vocal cords directly through the skull to the hears. (Stick your fingers in your ears and speak and you'll only hear the direct sound) What your voice sounds like to others is always much thinner sounding. This is why people have a hard time recognizing and getting used to their own recorded voices. They always hear it as much thinner sounding when the direct sound getting to their ears isn't there. With the right mic, those differences disappear.
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